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Veterinary Technology

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Associate Degree

A.S. in Veterinary Technology

CRC's Veterinary Technology Associate of Science Degree program provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to pursue a career as a Registered Veterinary Technician (RVT). The program offers a rigorous and rewarding academic curriculum along with ample hands-on experience.





Veterinary Technicians work under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian assisting in a variety of tasks including collection of laboratory specimens and performing laboratory procedures; providing specialized nursing care; preparing animals, instruments, and equipment for surgery; assisting in diagnostic, medical, and surgical procedures; exposing and developing radiographs (X-rays); advising and educating animal owners; supervising and training practice personnel; and performing dental prophylaxes. Most veterinary technicians work in private veterinary practices, but they may also work in biomedical research, military service, food safety inspection, teaching, zoo animal and wildlife care, diagnostic laboratory support, veterinary supply sales, animal control and humane society animal care, and drug and feed company technical service and sales. (source: AVMA.org) RVTs are trained professionals who have passed the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE) and who have subsequently obtained licensure. The CRC Veterinary Technology program is not intended to be a pre-veterinary program for students who want to pursue a doctorate degree to become a veterinarian. CRC counselors are available to help students navigate their choice of program.



CRC's Veterinary Technology program is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association and upon earning an A.S. degree in Veterinary Technology, graduates are eligible to take the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE).



Most states, including California, require official licensing or certification of veterinary technicians. To become a licensed RVT in California, graduates earning the A.S. degree must:



• Pass the Veterinary Technician National Examination

• Obtain fingerprint clearance (Live scan) and pass a background check

• Pay licensing fees to the California Veterinary Medical Board. (More information can be found at vmb.ca.gov)



Program highlights include:



• Accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association for over 50 years.

• Long-tenured, approachable, and knowledgeable faculty and staff

• Affordable community college program

• Well-equipped facilities

• Diversity of animal species available for instruction

• Collaboration with UC Davis for large animal instruction

• Outdoor exercise and enrichment area for dogs

• Enthusiastic and supportive student body

• Excellent pass rates on the VTNE





PROGRAM SCHEDULE (A.S. Degree):



Students must follow the program schedule in order and must pass all courses in each semester with a "C" or better to advance to the next semester. Each VT course is offered once per year in either the spring or fall semester. A student's progress will be delayed by one year if a course is missed or must be repeated.



* SEMESTER 1 (Fall): VT 100, VT 111

* SEMESTER 2 (Spring): VT 110, VT 113, VT 152

* SEMESTER 3 (Summer): VT 298**

* SEMESTER 4 (Fall): VT 120, VT 122, VT 126, VT 298**

* SEMESTER 5 (Spring): VT123, VT 130, VT 131, VT 134





**VT 298 Work Experience: All students must complete 300 hours of work experience at a program-approved veterinary facility. VT 298 is only offered in the summer and fall semesters and is open to students progressing into their second year of the program.





All students are required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts will be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

Catalog Date: August 1, 2024

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
First Year (Fall):
VT 100 Introduction to Veterinary Technology 31
VT 111 Anatomy-Physiology of Animals 42
First Year (Spring):
VT 152 Introduction to Laboratory Animals and Caged Birds 23
VT 110 Veterinary Office Practice 34
VT 113 Clinical Laboratory Techniques for Veterinary Technicians 45
Second Year (Fall):
VT 120 Pharmacology and Anesthesiology for the Veterinary Technician 46
VT 122 Animal Disease: Pathology 37
VT 126 Dentistry for the Veterinary Technician 1.58
Second Year (Spring):
VT 123 Large Animal Disease: Pathology 39
VT 130 Advanced Veterinary Technology 410
VT 131 Introduction to Diagnostic Imaging 311
VT 134 Large Animal Nursing 1.512
Summer Between First and Second Year; and Second Year (Fall):
VT 298 Work Experience in Veterinary Technology 0.5 -413
Total Units: 36.5 - 40

1Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

2Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

3Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

4Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

5Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

6Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

7Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

8Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

9Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

10Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

11Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

12Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

13All students must complete a minimum of 300 hours (4-5 total units) of work experience. Students in a paid work experience earn one unit per 75 hours worked. Students in an unpaid work experience earn one unit per 60 hours worked. VT 298 may be repeated when there is new or expanded learning on the job.

The Veterinary Technology Associate in Science (A.S.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See CRC graduation requirements.

Enrollment Eligibility

To be eligible for enrollment in the program, the student must meet the following criteria:

  • Completion of BIOL 400 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Completion of CHEM 400 or CHEM 305 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Completion of BIOL 440 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Completion of the online application.
  • Submission of a copy of high school diploma or equivalent.
  • Submission of official transcripts reflecting pre-requisite completion.
  • Submission of proof of pre-exposure rabies vaccination prior to the first day of the first semester.

Enrollment Process

Eligible students are selected for the program according to the following steps:

  • Up to 30 eligible students are randomly drawn and admitted to the program only once a year in the fall semester. Final selection is made after the application deadline, and applicants will be notified by email of acceptance or non-acceptance by mid-July.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • PSLO 1: Use the principles of pharmacology to assist the veterinarian in a clinical setting.
  • PSLO 2: Provide veterinary nursing care and surgical assistance in a clinical setting.
  • PSLO 3: Use the principles of radiology to assist the veterinarian in a clinical setting.
  • PSLO 4: Perform clinical laboratory duties within a veterinary hospital.
  • PSLO 5: Use the principles of veterinary dentistry to assist the veterinarian in a clinical setting.
  • PSLO 6: Perform clerical duties within a veterinary hospital.
  • PSLO 7: Provide safe, humane, and effective care for common laboratory animals used in animal research.
  • PSLO 8: Provide safe, humane, and effective care for birds, reptiles, amphibians, rabbits, and guinea pigs.

Career Information

Most veterinary technicians are employed in private practice, but the demand for technicians is rapidly expanding and includes new employment opportunities in human and animal health-related areas and specialties such as biomedical research, military service, food safety inspection, teaching, zoo animal and wildlife care, diagnostic laboratory support, veterinary supply sales, animal control and humane society animal care, and drug and feed company technical service and sales. (source: AVMA.org)

Certificate of Achievement

Veterinary Technology Certificate

CRC's Veterinary Technology Certificate program provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to pursue employment as an unlicensed veterinary assistant or to pursue the California Veterinary Medical Board's (VMB) alternate route to licensure as a Registered Veterinary Technician (RVT). The program offers a rigorous and rewarding academic curriculum along with ample hands-on experience.



Unlicensed veterinary assistants support veterinarians and RVTs in their daily tasks. Veterinary assistants' duties include performing kennel work, assisting in the restraint and handling of animals, and performing clerical duties. There is no required credentialing exam for unlicensed veterinary assistants. RVTs are trained professionals who have passed the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE) and who have subsequently obtained licensure. The CRC Veterinary Technology program is not intended to be a pre-veterinary program for students who want to pursue a doctorate degree to become a veterinarian. CRC counselors are available to help students navigate their choice of program.



Students who wish to pursue an RVT license through the California VMB's alternate route are encouraged to research the requirements on the VMB's applicant website: https://vmb.ca.gov/applicants/rvt_forms.shtml



In summary, the alternate route to California licensure includes:



• Extensive practical experience as an unlicensed veterinary assistant and submission of a comprehensive task list and proof of experience form.

•Proof of required educational coursework including official transcripts, certificates of completion, course descriptions or outlines, and hours completed.

•Verification of passing the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE).

Fingerprint clearance (Live scan) and background check.

Payment of licensing fees to the California Veterinary Medical Board.

•Most students who are seeking a career as a licensed RVT find it easiest to complete the CRC Veterinary Technology A.S. degree.





Veterinary Technology Program highlights include:



• Accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association for over 50 years.

• Long-tenured, approachable, and knowledgeable faculty and staff

• Affordable community college program

• Well-equipped facilities

• Diversity of animal species available for instruction

• Collaboration with UC Davis for large animal instruction

• Outdoor exercise and enrichment area for dogs

• Enthusiastic and supportive student body

• Excellent pass rates on the VTNE





PROGRAM SCHEDULE (Certificate):



Students must follow the program schedule in order and must pass all courses in each semester with a "C" or better to advance to the next semester. Each VT course is offered once per year in either the spring or fall semester. A student's progress will be delayed by one year if a course is missed or must be repeated.



* SEMESTER 1 (Fall): VT 100, VT 111

* SEMESTER 2 (Spring): VT 110, VT 113, VT 152

* SEMESTER 4 (Fall): VT 120, VT 122, VT 126

* SEMESTER 5 (Spring): VT123, VT 130, VT 131, VT 134





All students are required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts will be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

Catalog Date: August 1, 2024

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
VT 100 Introduction to Veterinary Technology 31
VT 111 Anatomy-Physiology of Animals 42
VT 110 Veterinary Office Practice 33
VT 113 Clinical Laboratory Techniques for Veterinary Technicians 44
VT 152 Introduction to Laboratory Animals and Caged Birds 25
VT 120 Pharmacology and Anesthesiology for the Veterinary Technician 46
VT 122 Animal Disease: Pathology 37
VT 126 Dentistry for the Veterinary Technician 1.58
VT 123 Large Animal Disease: Pathology 39
VT 130 Advanced Veterinary Technology 410
VT 131 Introduction to Diagnostic Imaging 311
VT 134 Large Animal Nursing 1.512
Total Units: 36

1Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

2Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

3Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

4Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

5Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

6Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

7Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

8Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

9Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

10Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

11Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

12Students will also be required to spend a minimum of 6 hours per week during assigned shifts to care for the colony animals on campus. Shifts are scheduled outside of regular class time. Animal care shifts may be scheduled on weekends and holidays as well as semester breaks.

Enrollment Eligibility

To be eligible for enrollment in the program, the student must meet the following criteria:

  • Completion of BIOL 400 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Completion of CHEM 400 or CHEM 305 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Completion of BIOL 440 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Completion of the online application.
  • Submission of a copy of high school diploma or equivalent.
  • Submission of official transcripts reflecting pre-requisite completion.
  • Submission of proof of pre-exposure rabies vaccination prior to the first day of the first semester.

Enrollment Process

Eligible students are selected for the program according to the following steps:

  • Up to 30 eligible students are randomly drawn and admitted to the program only once a year in the fall semester. Final selection is made after the application deadline, and applicants will be notified by email of acceptance or non-acceptance by mid-July.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • PSLO 1: Use the principles of pharmacology to assist the veterinarian in a clinical setting.
  • PSLO 2: Provide veterinary nursing care and surgical assistance in a clinical setting.
  • PSLO 3: Use the principles of radiology to assist the veterinarian in a clinical setting.
  • PSLO 4: Perform clinical laboratory duties within a veterinary hospital.
  • PSLO 5: Use the principles of veterinary dentistry to assist the veterinarian in a clinical setting.
  • PSLO 6: Perform clerical duties within a veterinary hospital.
  • PSLO 7: Provide safe, humane, and effective care for common laboratory animals used in animal research.
  • PSLO 8: Provide safe, humane, and effective care for birds, reptiles, amphibians, rabbits, and guinea pigs.

Career Information

Most veterinary assistants and technicians are employed in private practice, but the demand for technicians is rapidly expanding and includes new employment opportunities in human and animal health-related areas and specialties such as biomedical research, military service, food safety inspection, teaching, zoo animal and wildlife care, diagnostic laboratory support, veterinary supply sales, animal control and humane society animal care, and drug and feed company technical service and sales. (source: AVMA.org)

More About the Program

Learn about eligibility requirements, how to apply, and answers to frequently asked questions.

Veterinary Technology Dept.

Career Education

This major is part of CRC's Career Education (CE) Program. Request assistance from Career Education by dropping us a line!

Request Info

Scholarships

Apply for scholarships for Veterinary Technology students:

  • CRC Ann and Sadie J. Memorial Vet Tech Scholarship ($500)

Applications open spring semester.

Scholarships

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