Facts and Statistics

Get to Know Us

Get to know Cosumnes River College better by taking a look at some helpful resources:

Facts at a Glance (PDF) – one-sheet that includes current demographic and data points on Cosumnes River College.

Vision for Success Goals (PDF) – state-mandated goals measuring student performance and outcomes.

Institutional Student Learning Outcomes – the general knowledge and skills that all Cosumnes River College students should be able to demonstrate at the time of graduation.

California Community Colleges Student Success Scorecard for Cosumnes River College – a performance measurement system established by the Board of Governors that tracks student success at all 114 community colleges.

Student Equity Plan

Student Equity Goals

Approved by Academic Senate on April 5, 2019.

1) Access - Successful Enrollment

Overall Student Population:
Baseline Year (2017-18): 41.9%
End Year (2021-22): 46.3%

Disproportionately Impacted Groups: Black or African American (All), Black or African American (Female), Black or African American (Male), Disabled (All), Disabled (Female), Foster Youth (All), Foster Youth (Male), LGBT (All), LGBT (Female), LGBT (Male), Some other race (All), Some other race (Female), White (All), and White (Female)

Equity Goal: Reduce equity gaps for disproportionately impacted groups by 40%.

2) Retention - Fall to Spring

Overall Student Population:
Baseline Year (2017-18): 62.8%
End Year (2021-22): 67.8%

Disproportionately Impacted Groups: Black or African American (All), Black or African American (Female), Black or African American (Male), First Generation (All), First Generation (Female), First Generation (Male), LGBT (All), LGBT (Female), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (All), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (Male), Some other race (All), Veteran (All), Veteran (Female), Veteran (Male), White (All), and White (Female)

Equity Goal: Reduce equity gaps for disproportionately impacted groups by 40%.

3) Transfer to a four-year

Overall Student Population:
Baseline Year (2017-18): 1,339
End Year (2021-22): 1,477

Disproportionately Impacted Groups: American Indian or Alaska Native (Female), Black or African American (All), Black or African American (Female), Disabled (All), Disabled (Female), Disabled (Male), First Generation (Female), Foster Youth (All), Foster Youth (Female), Foster Youth (Male), LGBT (All), LGBT (Male), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (All), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (Female), and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (Male)

Equity Goal: Reduce equity gaps for disproportionately impacted groups by 40%.

4) Completion of Transfer-Level Math/English

Overall Student Population:
Baseline Year (2017-18): 5.6%
End Year (2021-22): 10.6%

Disproportionately Impacted Groups: Black or African American (All), Black or African American (Female), Black or African American (Male), Disabled (All), Disabled (Male), First Generation (All), First Generation (Female), First Generation (Male), Foster Youth (Male), Hispanic or Latino (All), Hispanic or Latino (Female), Hispanic or Latino (Male), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (All), and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (Female)

Equity Goal: Reduce equity gaps for disproportionately impacted groups by 40%.

5) Earned Certificate/Degree

Overall Student Population:
Baseline Year (2017-18): 827
End Year (2021-22): 1,036

Disproportionately Impacted Groups:American Indian or Alaska Native (All), American Indian or Alaska Native (Male), Black or African American (All), Black or African American (Female), Black or African American (Male), Foster Youth (All), Foster Youth (Female), Foster Youth (Male), LGBT (All), LGBT (Female), LGBT (Male), More than one race (All), More than one race (Female), More than one race (Male), and Some other race (Female)

Equity Goal: Reduce equity gaps for disproportionately impacted groups by 40%.

Please note, these goals are based on Student Equity and Achievement (SEA) dataset provided by the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office; retrieved March 28, 2019. These data are subject to change prior to the June 30, 2019 deadline for submission. Cosumnes River College's Strategic Plan Indicators of Achievement align well with the Student Equity Plan goals. Additionally, the College uses a goal-setting methodology that allows us to quickly update our goals to reflect the most accurate data available.

Student Equity Plan Activities

Approved by Academic Senate on April 5, 2019.

1) Access - Successful Enrollment
  • Continue to follow up with students going through admission steps to ensure that students successfully complete the process and enroll.
  • Ensure the fall semester course schedule is available in early March to facilitate the enrollment process for new students.
  • Encourage new students to register for 15 units, including math and English courses, in their first semester to improve their timely completion and maximize their financial aid benefits. Provide online access for students who are not able to come to campus to complete the enrollment process.
  • Incorporate Financial Aid into the enrollment process. Ensure that students can sign up for Financial Aid/Dream Act early in their transition process.
  • Maintain effective and consistent approach that integrates campus-wide outreach efforts with feeder schools and surrounding communities by incorporating various departments/divisions, such as Workforce Development/CTE, Dual Enrollment, Elk Grove Center, etc.
  • Develop and implement processes that intentionally connect students to academic and student support services, such as tutoring, career/exploration, transfer, and community services.
  • Plan and implement integrated transfer and career pathways to ensure that students have comprehensive educational plans that support their pathway and career goals.
  • Expand peer-mentor initiatives as part of the College’s new student experience.
  • Continue the curriculum alignment work with K-12 schools with the goal of creating seamless transition into transfer-level courses for high school students.
  • Improve communication with students throughout all parts of the onboarding process.
  • Improve advertising of programs and opportunities at the College for traditional and non- traditional students.
  • Identify and implement cost-saving measures (i.e., zero textbook costs and use of open educational resources (OER)) to support access to course materials.
  • Explore the viability of non-credit options, including partnerships with adult education for math, English, and ESL courses.

Access - Disproportionately Impacted Groups

  • Identify and provide additional support to disproportionately impacted students who are going through the matriculation steps. Additional support includes, but is not limited to: one-on-one support with the application and registration processes; financial aid, and other enrollment steps.
  • Identify and implement evidence-based best practices that will support disproportionately impacted students  overcome basic need barriers that hinder their enrollment and success at the College. This additional support includes connecting students to campus (i.e., the Hawk Spot) and off-campus resources and services.
  • Identify and implement evidence-based best practices that will improve the participation rate of disproportionately impacted students in campus-wide programs. (Programs will be expected to regularly evaluate their effectiveness in addressing/closing equity gaps.)
  • Continue and expand targeted outreach strategies aimed at improving the participation rate of disproportionately impacted students in campus-wide programs.
  • Continue and expand outreach activities designed to connect with community-based organizations that serve disproportionately impacted groups.
  • Increase and expand equity-focused professional development and training opportunities focused on closing equity gaps and student success; this includes addressing implicit bias as an institution.
2) Retention - Fall to Spring
  • Continue to expand academic and student support services regarding retention and persistence, such as supplemental instruction, use of online counseling, and discipline- specific workshops.
  • Increase students’ understanding and utilization of financial and career resources available to them.
  • Increase support for activities designed to improve students’ fall to spring retention and timely completion of their educational goals, such as career/major workshops, internships, and professional development opportunities.
  • Continue to integrate and enhance initiatives and other special programs designed to improve students’ fall to spring retention and timely completion of their educational goals; this includes programs such as Umoja, A2MEND, Puente, and Guardian Scholars.
  • Expand the current case management model, including support for students on academic probation/dismissal and those who may be at risk of being placed on probation, in order to increase their fall to spring retention and timely completion.
  • Plan and implement an early referral system for faculty, throughout the semester, to refer students, struggling personally and academically, to support services.
  • Increase the number of students who receive counseling guidance to develop comprehensive educational plan, with an emphasis on undecided students.
  • Complete development of integrated transfer and career pathways to ensure that students have career/transfer plan after their first semester.
  • Expand peer-mentor initiatives as part of the College’s student experience.
  • Offer professional development opportunities for classified professionals and faculty in support of campus-wide resources and initiatives. This includes Pathways, OEI, AB705 implementation and support, as well as addressing holistic needs of the students (i.e., mental health and wellness).
  • Identify and implement cost-saving measures (i.e., zero textbook costs and use of open educational resources (OER)) to support access to course materials.
  • Create more welcoming spaces for students to promote engagement and community, which includes more interaction with faculty, classified professionals, and administrators.

Retention - Disproportionately Impacted Groups

  • Identify specific gateway courses with high levels of failure rates for disproportionately impacted groups. Provide ongoing professional development for faculty who teach these courses.
  • Identify and provide additional support to disproportionately impacted students who are going through the matriculation steps.
  • Implement strategies to support disproportionately impacted students overcome basic need barriers that hinder their enrollment and success at the College.
  • Plan and implement targeted outreach strategy aimed at improving the participation rate of disproportionately impacted students in campus-wide programs.
  • Continue and expand outreach activities designed to connect with community-based organizations that serve disproportionately impacted groups.
  • Improve disproportionately impacted students’ utilization rates for tutoring and academic support services to increase their fall to spring retention and timely completion of their educational goals.
  • Plan and implement strategies to increase course completion for disproportionately impacted students.
  • Expand the current case management model to support disproportionately impacted students who are at risk of being placed on academic probation.
  • Increase and expand equity-focused professional development and training opportunities focused on closing equity gaps and student success; this includes culturally-relevant curriculum and instructional re-design, Teaching and Learning Academies focused on successful classroom strategies for disproportionately impacted groups in cohorts, and one-on-one faculty coaching.
  • Provide opportunities for disproportionately impacted students to participate in local and national events aimed at improving their success rate, self-confidence, and engagement.
  • Continue campus-based cultural events aimed at creating a welcoming environment as well as increase awareness of the campus community related to the experiences and cultures of historically underserved and underrepresented groups; these student groups include formerly incarcerated students.
  • Identify and implement evidence-based best practices that will support disproportionately impacted students overcome basic need barriers that hinder their academic success and retention at the College. This additional support includes connecting students to campus (i.e., the Hawk Spot) and off-campus resources and services.
3) Transfer to a four-year
  • Increase the number of transfer-seeking students who receive counseling guidance to develop comprehensive educational plan, with an emphasis on undecided students.
  • Work with primary transfer institutions for the College’s students (i.e. CSU Sacramento, UC Davis, etc.) to identify and work on issues that students struggle with when they transfer, including financial resources.
  • Collaborate with regional transfer institutions to support their summer transfer orientation workshops (i.e., summer prep academies).
  • Increase student field trips to transfer institutions, with an emphasis on visiting campuses with transfer guarantee programs.
  • Increase options for transfer, including to historically black colleges or universities (HBCUs).
  • Design/implement a “transfer-ready” campaign to support transfer-seeking students, and increase participation in, and number of, transfer workshops.
  • Continue to integrate and enhance initiatives and other special programs designed to improve students’ fall to spring retention and timely completion of their educational goals; this includes programs such as Umoja, A2MEND, Puente, and Guardian Scholars.
  • Expand the current case management model to support students beyond their first year, especially to students with 30 transferable units or more and/or students who are off track from their comprehensive educational plan for transfer.
  • Plan and implement an early referral system for faculty, throughout the semester, to refer students, struggling personally and academically, to support services.
  • Expand the current case management model, including support for students on academic probation/dismissal and those who may be at risk of being placed on probation, in order to increase their fall to spring retention and timely completion.
  • Expand peer-mentor initiatives as part of the student experience.
  • Identify and implement cost-saving measures (i.e., zero textbook costs and use of open educational resources (OER)) to support access to course materials.
  • Continue the curriculum alignment work with K-12 schools with the goal of creating seamless transition into transfer-level courses for high school students.
  • Offer professional development opportunities for classified professionals and faculty in support of campus-wide resources and initiatives. This includes Pathways, OEI, AB705 implementation and support, as well as addressing holistic needs of the students (i.e., mental health and wellness).

Transfer - Disproportionately Impacted Groups

  • Plan and implement strategies to increase course completion for disproportionately impacted students.
  • Implement strategies to support disproportionately impacted students overcome basic need barriers that hinder their enrollment and success at the College.
  • Expand the current case management model to support disproportionately impacted students who are at risk of being placed on academic probation.
  • Offer targeted transfer and career services to disproportionately impacted students with 30 or more transferable units.
  • Increase and expand equity-focused professional development and training opportunities focused on closing equity gaps and student success; this includes culturally-relevant curriculum and instructional design.
  • Provide opportunities for disproportionately impacted students to participate in local and national events aimed at improving their success rate, self-confidence, and engagement.
4) Completion of Transfer-Level Math/English
  • Offer professional development opportunities to support the completion of AB705 course curriculum development.
  • Expand and increase usage of the academic and student support services for students regarding onboarding, retention, and persistence, such as guided self-placement, supplemental instruction, online tutoring, and English/math skills refresher workshops.
  • Increase enrollment in English and math courses, especially for students in their first year.
  • Continue to integrate and enhance initiatives and other special programs designed to improve students’ fall to spring retention and timely completion of their educational goals; this includes programs such as Umoja, A2MEND, Puente, and Guardian Scholars.
  • Expand the current case management model, including support for students on academic probation/dismissal, and those who may be at risk of being placed on probation, in order to increase their fall to spring retention and timely completion.
  • Plan and implement an early referral system for faculty, throughout the semester, to refer students, struggling personally and academically, to support services.
  • Continue the curriculum alignment work with K-12 schools with the goal of creating seamless transition into transfer-level courses for high school students.
  • Offer professional development opportunities for classified professionals and faculty in support of campus-wide resources and initiatives. This includes Pathways, OEI, AB705 implementation and support, as well as addressing holistic needs of the students (i.e., mental health and wellness).
  • Identify and implement cost-saving measures (i.e., zero textbook costs and use of open educational resources (OER)) to support access to course materials.
  • Explore the viability of non-credit options, including partnerships with adult education for Math, English, and ESL courses.

Completion of Transfer-Level Math/English - Disproportionately Impacted Groups

  • Improve disproportionately impacted students’ utilization rates for tutoring and academic support services to increase their fall to spring retention and timely completion of their educational goals.
  • Plan and implement strategies to increase course completion for disproportionately impacted students.
  • Implement strategies to support disproportionately impacted students overcome basic need barriers that hinder their enrollment and success at the College.
  • Expand the current case management model to support disproportionately impacted students who are at risk of being placed on academic probation.
  • Increase and expand equity-focused professional development and training opportunities focused on closing equity gaps and student success; this includes culturally-relevant curriculum and instructional design.
  • Provide opportunities for disproportionately impacted students to participate in local and national events aimed at improving their success rate, self-confidence, and engagement.
5) Earned Certificate/Degree
  • Continue to integrate initiatives and other special programs/activities designed to improve students’ fall to spring retention and timely completion of their educational goals, such as the new “15 to Finish” campaign for first-time new students and career/workshop opportunities (e.g. career fairs/job shadowing).
  • Implement a proactive approach to evaluating students’ transcripts to determine if students have met graduation and/or transfer requirements.
  • Increase the number of students who receive counseling guidance to develop comprehensive educational plan, with an emphasis on undecided students.
  • Expand the current case management model, including support for students on academic probation/dismissal, and those who may be at risk of being placed on probation, in order to increase their fall to spring retention and timely completion.
  • Plan and implement an early referral system for faculty, throughout the semester, to refer students, struggling personally and academically, to support services.
  • Expand peer-mentor initiatives as part of the student experience.
  • Offer professional development opportunities for classified professionals and faculty in support of campus-wide resources and initiatives. This includes Pathways, OEI, AB705 implementation and support, as well as addressing holistic needs of the students (i.e., mental health and wellness).
  • Identify and implement cost-saving measures (i.e., zero textbook costs and use of open educational resources (OER)) to support access to course materials.

Earned Certificate/Degree - Disproportionately Impacted Groups

  • Plan and implement strategies to increase course completion for disproportionately impacted students.
  • Implement strategies to support disproportionately impacted students overcome basic need barriers that hinder their enrollment and success at the College.
  • Expand the current case management model to support disproportionately impacted students who are at risk of being placed on academic probation.
  • Increase and expand equity-focused professional development and training opportunities focused on closing equity gaps and student success; this includes culturally-relevant curriculum and instructional design.
  • Provide opportunities for disproportionately impacted students to participate in local and national events aimed at improving their success rate, self-confidence, and engagement.
  • Continue campus-based cultural events aimed at creating a welcoming environment as well as increasing awareness of the campus community related to the experiences and cultures of historically underserved and underrepresented groups; these student groups include formerly incarcerated students.

Prior Plans Accounting of Expenditures

2015-16

Object Code

Category

Expenditures

1000

Academic Salaries

$837,338

2000

Classified and other non-academic salaries

$1,522,848

3000

Employee Benefits

$697,279

4000

Supplies and Materials

$163,825

5000

Other Operating Expenses and Services

$232,842

6000

Capital Outlay

$14,618

7000

Other Outgo

$43,601

*This table displays the expenditure amounts for the SSSP-credit, Basic Skills Initiative, and Student Equity. LRCCD also funded SSSP-match for CRC in the amount of $2,210,143.

 


2016-17

Object Code

Category

Expenditures

1000

Academic Salaries

$725,183

2000

Classified and other non-academic salaries

$1,420,943

3000

Employee Benefits

$635,664

4000

Supplies and Materials

$249,445

5000

Other Operating Expenses and Services

$507,447

6000

Capital Outlay

$43,044

7000

Other Outgo

$151,795

*This table displays the expenditure amounts for the SSSP-credit, Basic Skills Initiative, and Student Equity. LRCCD also funded SSSP-match for CRC in the amount of $2,482,814.

 


2017-18

Object Code

Category

Expenditures

1000

Academic Salaries

$641,274

2000

Classified and other non-academic salaries

$1,801,770

3000

Employee Benefits

$754,165

4000

Supplies and Materials

$293,969

5000

Other Operating Expenses and Services

$285,736

6000

Capital Outlay

$31,300

7000

Other Outgo

$34,000

*This table displays the expenditure amounts for the SSSP-credit, Basic Skills Initiative, and Student Equity. LRCCD also funded SSSP-match for CRC in the amount of $2,357,438.

 

Assessment Progress of Prior Plans

Summary of progress towards achieving previous 2017 Integrated Student Success Plan's goals:

English Progression
The percentage of students who attempt a basic skills English course (ENGWR 42/58) who attempt a transfer-level English course in three years.

Assessment: English progression rates increased from 35.4% in 2016-2017 to 37.2% in 2017-2018. Equity gaps decreased for all groups identified as disproportionately impacted: male African American students, female students with a reported disability, female African American students, and female Hispanic/Latino students.

Math Progression
The percentage of students who attempt a basic skills math course (Math 20, 30, 100, 101, and 102) who attempt a transfer-level Math/Stat course in three years.

Assessment: Math progression rates increased from 11.6% in 2016-2017 to 16.5% in 2017-2018. Equity gaps were reduced for several groups identified as disproportionately impacted: male students with a reported disability, male African American students, female first generation students, male White students, female multi-race students, and male first generation students. However, equity gaps increased for female African American students, female foster youth students, female students with a reported disability, and male low-income students.

ESL Progression
The percentage of students who attempt a basic skills math course (ESLW, ESLR, ESLL, 20, 30, 40) who attempt a transfer-level ESL/English course in three years.

Assessment: ESL progression rates increased from 44.0% in 2016-2017 to 48.0% in 2017-2018. Equity gaps were reduced for all groups identified as disproportionately impacted: non-veteran male students, female first generation students, male Asian students, and male non-first generation students.

Completion Goals:


Overall Students' Completion Rate
The percentage of new degree/transfer seeking students who complete a degree, certificate, transfer, or reach transfer-prepared status in three years.

Assessment: Overall three-year completion rate for Cosumnes River College increased from 18.4% in 2015-2016 to 22.9% in 2017-2018. Equity gaps were reduced for several groups identified as disproportionately impacted: female foster youth students, male multi-race students, male first generation students, female Hispanic/Latino students, and female low-income students. However, equity gaps increased for several groups identified as disproportionately impacted: female students with a reported disability, male foster youth students, male Hispanic/Latino students, male low-income students, male students with a reported disability, and female African American students.

Unprepared Completion Rate
The percentage of new degree/transfer seeking students who begin their math and/or English course sequence below transfer-level and complete a degree, certificate, transfer, or reach transfer-prepared status in three years.

Assessment: Overall three-year completion rates for unprepared students increased from 9.7% in 2015-2016 to 13.3% in 2017-2018. However, equity gaps increased for many student groups identified as disproportionately impacted: female foster youth students, female students with a reported disability, male Hispanic/Latino students, female African American students, male first generation students, and male low-income students. Equity gaps were reduced for male Asian students and female Hispanic/Latino students.

Prepared Completion Rate
The percentage of new degree/transfer seeking students who place into transfer level math and/or English and complete a degree, certificate, transfer, or reach transfer-prepared status in three years.

Assessment: Overall three-year completion rates for prepared students increased from 29.7% in 2015-2016 to 36.1% in 2017-2018. Equity gaps were reduced for male multi-race students and male first generation students. However, equity gaps increased for many student groups identified as disproportionately impacted: male African American students, male Hispanic/Latino students, male low-income students, and female Hispanic/Latino students.