Social Justice Studies

Social Justice Studies (SJS) Courses

SJS 299 Experimental Offering in Social Justice Studies

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


SJS 300 Introduction to Social Justice Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b) (effective Summer 2020); AA/AS Area VI (effective Summer 2020)
  • C-ID:C-ID SJS 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the theoretical and practical foundations of social justice and the social processes that create and resist oppression. It covers the sociology, history, and psychology of oppressions based upon race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and other group identities in the United States and abroad and the corresponding social justice movements for liberation. It investigates how creating and undoing asymmetrical power relations are linked to social structures, institutional processes, and culture. Additionally, it provides a basis for a better understanding of socioeconomic, political, and cultural conditions of key social groups in the United States and globally. Topics include theoretical foundations of social justice and oppression, history and politics of group identity, culture and ideologies, forms of oppression, privilege, and forms of resistance. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEFINE THE FOUNDATIONAL THEORIES WITHIN SOCIAL JUSTICE STUDIES. (SLO 1)
  • Critically evaluate the methodologies and ethics of social justice research including the role of bias. (Objective 1a)
  • Identify and analyze the foundations of social justice studies in ethical theory.(Objective 1b)
  • ASSESS THE STATUS, GROWTH, AND DIVERSITY OF MINORITY GROUPS IN THE UNITED STATES. (SLO 2)
  • Explain the histories, experiences, and contributions of groups oppressed because of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality in the United States. (Objective 2a)
  • Identify and analyze the role of culture in oppression and in empowerment, including art, film, literature, or music reflecting different groups. (Objective 2b)
  • ANALYZE THE COMPLEX INTERSECTIONS AND RELATIONSHIPS WITHIN AND ACROSS RACE, ETHNICITY, SOCIOECONOMIC CLASS, GENDER, SEXUAL ORIENTATION, AND OTHER IDENTITIES. (SLO 3)
  • Identify systematic forms of oppression and analyze the role of privilege and intersectionality for minority groups. (Objective 3a)
  • Apply the operation of privilege, oppression, and power asymmetry to major institutions such as education, health care, the economy and the criminal justice system. (Objective 3b)
  • IDENTIFY AND UNDERSTAND STRUGGLES OF SOCIAL JUSTICE, LIBERATION, AND DECOLONIZATION FOR RESISTING GROUPS GLOBALLY. (SLO 4)
  • Compare social justice movements in the United States to those globally. (Objective 4a)
  • Assess the importance of human rights efforts in promoting social justice around the world through non-governmental and grass roots organizations.(4b)

SJS 310 Introduction to LGBTQ Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID SJS 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ+) studies. It explores how LGBTQ+ communities in the U.S. and abroad are impacted by various social, cultural, historical, and political factors that create and resist oppression. It investigates the politics of sexuality and sexual identities as they intersect with race, ethnicity, class, and gender. It evaluates how sexual and gender prejudices function alongside racism, sexism, and classicism. Additionally, it provides a historical understanding of how queer activism and resistance movements in the U.S. and globally have responded to oppression and violence against LGBTQ communities. This course also includes contemporary LGBTQ+ issues in family, education, religion, and the law.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • ANALYZE THE VARIOUS WAYS PEOPLE IDENTIFY THEIR SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND/OR THEIR GENDER IDENTITY AND EXPRESSION. (SLO 1)
  • Examine sexual orientation and gender identity within Native American, African American, Latinx, Asian American, Pacific Islander, and recent immigrant communities in the United States and abroad. (Objective 1a)
  • Assess theories about sexual orientation and gender identity and expression within the context of feminist theory, gender theory, and queer theory. (Objective 1b)
  • EXPLORE THE INTERSECTIONS AND INTERRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SYSTEMIC FORMS OF OPPRESSION AGAINST LGBTQ COMMUNITIES AND THEIR INTERSECTING IDENTITIES WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF LGBTQ POLITICAL STRUGGLES IN THE UNITED STATES AND GLOBALLY. (SLO 2)
  • Assess the impact of hate crimes on LGBTQ individuals, the LGBTQ individuals, the community at large, and public policy. (Objective 2a)
  • Identify key historical movements and describe its contribution to domestic and international LGBTQ struggles for full human rights. (Objective 2b)
  • ASSESS THE CONTINUOUS EVOLUTION OF LEGAL POLICIES AND SOCIETAL VIEWS OF LGBTQ PEOPLE ON A GLOBAL LEVEL. (SLO 3)
  • Research the history of public health policy in the United States as well as internationally to explore the ways that LGBTQ people have consistently suffered under policies structured by sexual and gendered prejudices. (Objective 3a)
  • Explore the impact of our education system on the ability of LGBTQ individuals and communities to achieve social justice and equity. (Objective 3b)
  • EXAMINE THE EVOLUTION OF LGBTQ CULTURE IN LITERATURE, THE MEDIA, AND THE ARTS. (SLO 4)
  • Identify strategies LGBTQ artists use to draw the relationship between art and political resistance (Objective 4a).

SJS 499 Experimental Offering in Social Justice Studies

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020