Humanities

Humanities (HUM)

HUM 300 Classical Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course focuses upon Western culture in its attempt to interpret human experience and identity. The course examines basic human values as exemplified in the arts, philosophy and history. Emphasis is on the Greeks, the Romans, and the Judeo-Christian tradition up to the end of the Middle Ages.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Identify different artistic styles based on their historical periods, philosophical and or world view.
  • Objective 1a: Identify the specific form of art (i.e., sculpture, architecture, literature).
  • Objective 1b: Identify the subject matter of the art work and place it in a social and historical context.
  • SLO #2: Use methodological skills when interpreting art.
  • Objective 2a: Apply concepts of composition, subject, and execution when examining art from different disciplines.
  • Objective 2b: Relate the above information to historical change, whether it be technological (i.e., a new technique) or social (i.e., a new understanding of man in the universe).
  • SLO #3: Relate different art forms to each other using and understanding if the historical period in which they are created (i.e., a student might be asked to relate 5th century B.C. Greek ideas about perfection to the philosophy of Plato, the Parthenon and classic statuary.)
  • Objective 3a: Describe how three works of art in different media each describe the basic ideas of their time.
  • SLO #4: Use the methodology developed above and apply in to the contemporary culture.

HUM 301 Introduction to the Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Completion of ENGWR 101 or eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the Humanities and the Arts. Emphasis is placed on appreciation. Students develop the tools necessary to analyze and appreciate masterworks from diverse cultures and time periods.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: Identify art conceptually (What is art?)
  • Objective 1a: Identify the artistic form of a work of art.
  • Objective 1b: Evaluate and analyze the subject of a work of art.
  • Objective 1c: Interpret and criticize a work of art.
  • SLO 2: Apply methodologies to analyze a work of visual art (painting, sculpture, mixed media).
  • Objective 2a: Evaluate the principles of composition to different forms of the visual arts.
  • Objective 2b: Compare the elements of three examples from the visual arts (i.e., line, color, texture).
  • Objective 2c: Examine three examples of visual arts identifying their commonalities and differences.
  • SLO 3: Apply methodologies to analyze a work of Literary Art.
  • Objective 3a: Identify genres.
  • Objective 3b: Analyze three different literary pieces that share a common theme.
  • Objective 3c: Compare literature and the visual arts.
  • SLO 4: Apply methodologies to analyze a work of music or dance.
  • Objective 4a: Identify the elements of music or dance.
  • Objective 4b: Evaluate musical structures (for example what is Sonata Form?) or components of dance structures.
  • Objective 4c: Compare common musical forms or dance forms using themes from two different time periods or cultures.
  • SLO 5: Explore the interrelationships between the arts and historic, scientific and philosophic changes.
  • Objective 5a: Evaluate two works of art to historic events (for example the conquests of Alexander the Great and WWI).
  • Objective 5b: Evaluate two works of art to advances in science (for example the work of Sir Issac Newton and Albert Einstein).
  • Objective 5c: Compare two works of art in the context of philosophy (for example the Philosopher Plato of 5th century BC and the Philosopher Jean Paul Sartre of the 20th century AD).
  • SLO 6: Interpret contemporary forms of artistic expression.
  • Objective 6a: Apply critical and analytical skills to artistic forms of expression from the student's own culture and another that is contemporary (i.e., a culture not the student's own).
  • Objective 6b: Relate a contemporary work of art to recent historic events, scientific or philosophical changes.
  • Objective 6c: Evaluate the connection between current events and artistic expression.

HUM 310 Modern Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses upon Western culture in its attempt to interpret human experience and identity. The course examines basic human values as exemplified in the arts, philosophy, and history. Emphasis is on the Renaissance, the Baroque period, and the Modern World.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Identify and analyze different artistic styles based on their historical periods, philosophical and or scientific world view.
  • Objective 1a: Identify the specific form of art (i.e., music, painting).
  • Objective 1b: Analyze the subject of the art work and place it in a social and historical context.
  • SLO #2: Apply methodological skills when interpreting art.
  • Objective 2a: Apply concepts of composition, subject, and execution when examining art from different disciplines (i.e., a painting, a film, a photograph).
  • Objective 2b: Relate these concepts to historical change, whether it be technological (i.e., a new technique) or social (i.e., a new understanding of man and his place in the universe).
  • SLO #3: Compare and contrast different art forms to each other using an understanding of historical period, philosophical outlook (i.e., the ideas of Plato compared to the modern ideas of Karl Marx).
  • Objective 3a: Describe how three works of art in different media each describe the basic ideas of their time (i.e., relate a poem, a piece of music and a painting to ideas of Romanticism and the philosophy of Rousseau).
  • SLO #4: Identify and explain the methodology developed for earlier time periods to the works of art from contemporary culture.
  • Objective 4a: Identify the major artistic forces of contemporary culture (i.e., Mass Media and advertising).
  • Objective 4b: Relate artistic works to contemporary philosophical or political understanding (i.e., Existentialism in the 20th century or Postmodern culture in the 21st).

HUM 320 Asian Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The focus of the course is on ancient Indian, Chinese and Japanese cultures to interpret human experience and identity. The quest for truth is traced in a variety of forms of humanistic self-expression--literature, art, music, philosophy and history.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Analyze the intersection of art and the development of society in ancient India, China and Japan. (SLO 1)
  • 1a. Critique major aspects of arts analysis using specific works of visual art (art, sculpture, architecture).
  • 1b. Assess specific parameters of a social movement.
  • 1c. Diagnose the connection between a specific work of art and a specific social event or movement.
  • Criticize specific philosophical and political contributions to ancient Indian, Chinese and Japanese societies. (SLO 2)
  • 2a. Critique major aspects of literature (philosophical and political writings).
  • 2b. Research specific parameters of political movements.
  • 2c. Diagnose the relationship between specific political and philosophical writings and the social movements those writings foster.
  • Analyze the intersection between economics and the development of identity in India, China and Japan. (SLO 3)
  • 3a. Research basic economic principles.
  • 3b. Diagnose the relationship between economics and the development of racial identities, gender identities and caste identities.

HUM 324 Global Islam: Culture and Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course is an introduction to global Islamic cultures from the 7th century to contemporary times, with emphasis on religious/philosophic concepts, and their expression in literature and the arts. Focus is placed upon Arab, Persian, African, Asian and American contributions. Students may be required to attend a live performance or museum visit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EXPRESS INTELLECTUAL AWARENESS AND UNDERSTANDING OF FUNDAMENTAL ASPECTS OF ISLAMIC CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION, AND EXAMINE THEIR RELIGIOUS AND CULTURAL IMPACT UPON WORLD CIVILIZATIONS AND THE WEST AND THE EAST (SLO 1).
  • Recognize and discuss elements of concepts of beliefs, religious tradition and practice, political leadership and succession, within the faith of Islam.
  • Demonstrate understanding of diverse Muslim global cultures and their impact upon world civilizations and modernity.
  • ANALYZE CONCEPTS OF TOLERANCE, JIHAD, WAR AND PEACE WITHIN THE RELIGION OF ISLAM, IDEALLY AND IN HUMAN PRACTICE (SLO 2).
  • Contrast and compare the topics.
  • Apply the argument, weighing the religious ideal with the human practice within the Islamic/Muslim context in medieval and contemporary times.
  • DIFFERENTIATE ISLAMIC AND AMERICAN DEFINITIONS OF RACE, ETHNICITY, GENDER, CLASS, RELIGIOUS AND NON-RELIGIOUS DIFFERENCES (SLO 3).
  • Research, analyze and compare definitions.
  • Create and compose evaluative essays, papers, reports based upon English language and Quranic meanings.
  • IDENTIFY AND RECOGNIZE THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF ARTISTS, POETS, AND WRITERS OF BOTH GENDERS WITHIN THE MULTICULTURAL HERITAGE OF ISLAM (SLO 4).
  • Review, assess, and examine creative works of art and architecture, poetic examples and writings from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe and Muslims in America spanning the 7th century C.E. to contemporary times, a period of 1500 years.
  • DEVELOP CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS NECESSARY FOR FORMULATING AN ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK RELEVANT TO THE STUDY OF THE GLOBAL CULTURES AND HISTORY OF ISLAM (SLO 5).
  • Research topics to formulate and apply to an analytical framework relevant to the study of the global cultures and history of Islam.
  • Write evaluative essays and papers to apply to an analytical framework relevant to the study of the global cultures and history of Islam.
  • Design book and oral reports of works relevant to the study of the global cultures and history of Islam.
  • Compare and contrast current societal issues in the light of past history.
  • Analyze and contrast cultural components within two separate geographic regions of the Muslim world.
  • Critique and interpret cross-cultural comparative aspects of Islamic and Arab history in the Middle East, and the Muslim historical legacy in Africa, China, South Asia, and within the American experience.
  • IDENTIFY, EVALUATE, AND WEIGH ACHIEVEMENTS OF MUSLIM THEOLOGIANS AND PHILOSOPHERS WITHIN HISTORICAL PERIODS OF NARROW INTERPRETATION AND CREATIVE THOUGHT (SLO 6).
  • Define Islamic religious and philosophic systems and critique their effect upon representative art, literary and musical forms.
  • OUTLINE THE INTELLECTUAL LEGACY OF LEARNING AND RESEARCH IN MUSLIM URBAN CENTERS DURING THE ABBASID, ANDALUSIAN PERIODS AND CONTEMPORARY TIMES (SLO 7).
  • Locate and describe the centers of learning in Baghdad, Cordoba, Samarkand, Alexandria from the 8th Cent. C.E. into the 21st Century and their transmission of knowledge across cultures.

HUM 331 Latin American Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This interdisciplinary course focuses on understanding the cultures, societies, economics, politics and artistic expressions of Mexico, Central America and South America. The quest for understanding culture includes an exploration of literature, art, architecture, music, theatre, history, philosophy, politics, race, gender, and class. Emphasis is placed on Pre-Contact, Post-Conquest and Colonial, Post-Independence, Contemporary and Diasporic Latin American humanistic expressions of culture.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the intersection of art and the development of society in Latin America (Mexico, Central America and South America)- SLO 1
  • critique major aspects of arts analysis using specific works of visual art (art, sculpture, architecture)
  • assess specific parameters of a social movement
  • diagnose the connection between a specific work of art and a specific social event or movement
  • criticize specific philosophical and political contributions to Latin American societies - SLO 2
  • critique major aspects of literature (philosophical and political writings)
  • research specific parameters of political movements
  • diagnose the relationship between specific political and philosophical writings and the social movements those writings foster
  • evaluate the pattern of language origins and the effects of European colonialism on cultural development in Latin America - SLO 3
  • explain colonial movements from Europe to Mexico, Central America and South America
  • integrate understanding of the impact of European colonialism on language and indigenous sovereignty
  • evaluate race, class and gender through language and the legacies of colonialism
  • analyze the intersection between economics and the development of race, gender and class - SLO 4
  • research basic economic principles
  • diagnose the relationship between economics (indigenous and colonial) and the development of racial identities, gender identities and class inequalities

HUM 332 American Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines ideas and values about the American experience in the 20th century by analyzing the literature, art, music, philosophy and history of the past 100 years. The course draws upon the arts of African American, Native American, Asian American, Anglo and Latino cultures as avenues for understanding issues of race, ethnicity, class, and gender as they intersect with mainstream American values in the past 100 years. Students may be required to attend a live performance or museum exhibition.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: synthesize material from various sources and art forms and discuss them in the Historical context of 20th century America in the form of comparison and contrast essays.
  • Objective 1a: Apply concepts of composition, subject and execution when examining art from different historical periods
  • SLO #2: demonstrate an understanding of the history and artistic expression of at least three of the following groups; African American, Native American, Asian American, Anglo or Latino cultures.
  • SLO #3: identify major artistic works and important persons of the 20th century.
  • SLO #4: analyze the role of ethnicity, ethnocentrism and privilege its impact on American culture and students lives in a series of "hands on" exercises.
  • SLO #5: compare and contrast the role of the United States as a leader of civil rights, women's, and minority rights on the world scene after the 1960's with its role in the world today.
  • SLO #6: express their own first person experience of the Multi-cultural experience with the historical perspective of the last 100 years

HUM 339 African American Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines African American experience in the United States through the products of culture created by Black Americans. The course synthesizes the production of music, art, literature, politics and philosophy to understand historic and contemporary influences and experiences of African American identity and expression. Students may be required to attend and analyze at least one live performance of the arts (music, theater, dance) or museum.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Identify and analyze different artistic styles based on their historical periods, philosophical and or scientific world views.
  • Objective 1a: Identify the specific form of cultural production (i.e., arts, ideas, skills and institutions).
  • Objective 1b: Analyze the subject of the art work and place it in a social and historical context.
  • SLO #2: Apply methodological skills when interpreting art.
  • Objective 2a: Apply concepts of composition, subject, and execution when examining cultural production from different disciplines (i.e., a painting, a film, a photograph).
  • Objective 2b: Relate these concepts to historical change, whether it be technological (i.e., a new technique) or social (i.e., a new movement).
  • SLO #3: Compare and contrast different art forms to each other using an understanding of historical period, philosophical outlook (i.e., the ideas of Phillis Wheatley compared to the contemporary ideas of Nikki Giovanni).
  • Objective 3a: Describe how three works of art in different media each describe the basic ideas of their time (i.e., relate a poem, a piece of music and a painting to ideas of the Civil Rights era).
  • SLO #4: Identify and analyze the methodology developed for earlier time periods to the works of art from contemporary culture.
  • Objective 4a: Evaluate the major artistic forces of contemporary Black artists.
  • Objective 4b: Relate artistic works to contemporary philosophical or political understanding (i.e., Black Lives Matter or the rise of Black women in political discourse).

HUM 370 Women and the Creative Imagination

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the creative powers of women throughout the history of art from antiquity to the present. The course offers an interdisciplinary perspective on the contributions of women artists as evidenced in literature and the visual and performing arts. Using gender as the primary lens of analysis, this course seeks to uncover the broader contexts of female experience by probing the relationship women artists had to the historical periods in which they lived and worked. Students may be required to attend a live performance or museum visit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: Interpret through an historical lens the products of culture (arts, ideas, skills and institutions) associated with women.
  • Objective 1a: Evaluate the religious, historical, cultural, economic and technological factors that impact the lives of women artists.
  • Objective 1b: Analyze significant art forms produced by women.
  • Objective 1c: Compare and contrast the artworks created by women artists.
  • SLO 2: Apply methodological skills when interpreting art.
  • Objective 2a: Apply concepts of composition, subject, and execution when examining art from different disciplines (i.e., a painting, a film, a photograph).
  • Objective 2b: Relate these concepts to historical change, whether it be technological (i.e., a new technique) or social (i.e., a new understanding of man and his place in the universe).
  • Objective 2c: Utilize a feminist critique when interpreting products of culture.
  • SLO 3: Analyze cultural products by women across time and geography.
  • Objective 3a: Compare and contrast contemporary artists from different regions of the globe.
  • Objective 3b: Evaluate cultural production in relation to regional history and culture.

HUM 495 Independent Studies in Humanities

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.