History

History (HIST)

HIST 301 History of Western Civilization (to 1660)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 170
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

History 301 is a survey course on Western Civilization from c. 3000 BCE to 1600 CE. The course will trace the origins, development, and advancement of European Civilization from antiquity to early modernization. In addition to political analysis, emphasis will be placed upon the socio-economic structures of various peoples discussed during the four thousand six hundred year time period. Finally, the birth, growth, and later fragmentation of Christianity will be covered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of Western Civilization from c. 3000th BCE to the 17th century CE (SLO #1).
  • evaluate and assess the development of key civilizations and imperial powers through the use of critical thinking skills.
  • differentiate the diverse political and economical structures of each civilization and/or nation grouping covered in the course.
  • compare and contrast the common and diverse cultural and spiritual values of European peoples during the Middle Ages.
  • apply analytical skills in evaluating the effects of intellectual development on early Western Civilization.
  • survey and incorporate the geography discussed in the class.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the historian's methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #2).
  • analyze and describe selected topics from both lectures and required readings.
  • research and compose written work based on extensive research of secondary source materials.

HIST 302 History of Western Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey of Western Civilization from 1600 to the present. The course will trace the development and advancement of European nation-states from early modernization to the crises of the World Wars. In addition to political analysis, emphasis will be placed upon the ideological and socio-economic structures that developed during the last four hundred years of the 20th century. Finally, the effects of the Cold War and decolonization will also be addressed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of Western Civilization from the 17th century to the present (SLO #1).
  • evaluate and assess the development of nation-states in both Western and Eastern Europe through the use of critical thinking skills.
  • differentiate the diverse political and economical structures of each nation group covered in the course.
  • compare and contrast the common and diverse cultures of both Western and Eastern Europeans.
  • apply analytical skills in evaluating the effects of intellectual development on European History
  • survey and incorporate the geography discussed in the class.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the historian's methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #2).
  • analyze and describe selected topics from both lectures and required readings.
  • research and compose written work based on extensive research of secondary source materials.

HIST 307 History of World Civilizations to 1500

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

History 307 is a survey course on world civilization from c. 3000 BCE to 1500 CE. The course will trace the development of various peoples beginning with the first civilizations of Mesopotamia, India, and China to the establishment of great empires and infant nations of the world. In addition to political analysis, emphasis will be placed upon the advancement of various world cultures and social structures. Particular attention will be placed on the lives of the common people of various civilizations discussed during the four thousand, five hundred year time period. Finally, various world religions will be highlighted during the duration of the course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of World Civilization from c. 3000 BCE to the 16th century CE (SLO #1).
  • evaluate and assess the development of key civilizations and imperial powers through the use of critical thinking skills.
  • differentiate the diverse political and economical structures of each civilization and/or nation group covered in the course.
  • compare and contrast the development of religious values and the universal use of religion to manipulate the masses.
  • apply analytical skills in evaluating the effects of intellectual development on influential civilizations.
  • survey and incorporate the role of geography on developing civilizations discussed in the class.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the historian's methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #2).
  • analyze and describe selected topics from both lectures and required readings.
  • research and compose written work based on extensive research of secondary source materials.

HIST 308 History of World Civilizations, 1500 to Present

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

History 308 is a survey course on world civilization from 1500 to the present age. The course will cover the political, economic, and intellectual developments of various world social and cultural structures. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the increased integration of peoples and cultures as a result of globalization. Additional focus will center upon the influencing effects of modern warfare, military technology, and international politics in shaping world society. Analysis of these revolutionary changes of the past five hundred years will offer a better understanding of world society today.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of World Civilization from the 16th century to the present by comparing the diverse political and economic structures of each civilization /or nation covered in the course (SLO #1).
  • evaluate and interpret primary and secondary sources to better understand the historian's methods in reconstructing the past (SLO #2).
  • recognize the complexities of world civilization by assessing race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
  • apply analytical skills in evaluating how advancements in philosophy and religion, as well as cultural developments in art, music, and literature affected and shaped world societies.
  • survey the role of geography in influencing world societies by addressing the effects of both physical and natural environments.
  • research and compose written work based on extensive research of secondary source materials.

HIST 310 History of the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Previously HIST 312); UC (History 310 & 320 combined: Maximum transfer credit is one course. )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a) (effective Fall 2019); CSU Area D (effective Fall 2019); CSU Area F1 (effective Fall 2019); CSU Area F2 (effective Fall 2019); IGETC Area 4 (effective Fall 2019)
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 130 (effective Fall 2019)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey course on the establishment and development of the United States from its colonial beginnings to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the United States during the designated time period. The course will cover the ideological influences that were instrumental in shaping the Constitution and other related government structures. Additionally, the course will address the institution of slavery and how the divisive issue dismembered the nation and further complicated the process of Reconstruction.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the key events, individuals, and themes that have shaped United States history, to 1877.
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the chronology involved in this period of United States history.
  • Analyze the roles, contributions, sacrifices, and both the unique and common experiences of the wide variety of people who have been significant in the development of the United States in this period.
  • Assess the major aspects of the institution of slavery and the Atlantic Slave Trade as they relate to the development of the United States. These phenomena will be examined in terms of economics, culture, politics, religion and society.
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the geography of the area under study and offer a hypothesis concerning the role of geography in the development of the United States.
  • Investigate the philosophical reasoning behind and the nature of democratic ideology with a particular emphasis on the philosophical thinking of the framers of the Constitution and their antecedents.
  • Illustrate the relationship between national, state, and local governments and evaluate the effectiveness of the federal system.
  • SLO #2 Demonstrate an understanding of and an appreciation for historiography.
  • Examine methods of organizing and recording information; testing methods; distinguishing fact from opinion; the importance of historical distance, reflection and revision; the use of numerous and sometimes conflicting sources; the use of the past in an attempt to understand the present and speculate about (and prepare) for the future.
  • Research and prepare written work based on extensive use of primary and secondary sources.
  • SLO #3 Demonstrate the mastery of higher level analytical skills.
  • Illustrate the realities of history's inter-connectedness through the ability to compare and contrast events, times, individuals.
  • Develop historical themes using events and individuals from vastly different time periods.
  • Evaluate and analyze the connection between events in other parts of the world and developments in the United States.
  • Offer an appraisal of the cyclical nature of history.

HIST 311 History of the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU (Previously HIST 313.); UC (HIST 311 & 321 combined: Max transfer credit is one course.)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a) (effective Fall 2019); CSU Area D (effective Fall 2019); CSU Area F1 (effective Fall 2019); CSU Area F3 (effective Fall 2019); IGETC Area 4 (effective Fall 2019)
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140 (effective Fall 2019)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey course on the development and growth of the United States from Reconstruction to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the political, economic, social and cultural developments during the designated time period. The course will cover the establishment and evolutionary status of the U.S. as a leading world power. Additionally, the course will address the changes to American society resulting from various revolutionary movements on race, gender, orientation, and labor. Includes coverage of California state and local government.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the key events, individuals, and themes that have shaped United States History from 1865-Present (SLO #1).
  • Illustrate the nature of cause and effect relationships, concepts of continuity and change, the impact of ideas and individuals, and how it is that members of society both shape and are shaped by History.
  • Apply analytical skills in evaluating changes in both domestic and foreign affairs during the course time period (SLO #2).
  • Investigate and critically assess the roles, contributions, sacrifices and both the unique and common experiences of the wide variety of social and ethnic groups who have been significant in the development of the United States in this period.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the historian's methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #3).
  • Analyze different methods in reviewing information and distinguishing fact from bias in an attempt to understand the present and speculate about (and prepare for) the future.
  • Survey and incorporate the chronology and the geography discussed in this course.
  • Compare and contrast both Democrat and Republican Party platforms that evolved during the late 19th to early 21st centuries.
  • Research and compose written work based on primary and secondary source materials.
  • Critique the special role California has played in the growth and development of the United States in this period. Specifically, they will focus on the origins and revision of the California constitution; the nature and processes of state government and their impact on the nation as a whole (i.e. Progressive Era reforms); California’s ethnic and social diversity; California today.

HIST 312 History of the United States (to 1865)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (HIST 312 and 320 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey course on the establishment and development of the United States from its colonial beginnings to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the United States during the designated time period. The course will cover the ideological influences that were instrumental in shaping the Constitution and other related government structures. Additionally, the course will address the institution of slavery and how the divisive issue dismembered the nation and further complicated the process of Reconstruction.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the key events, individuals, and themes that have shaped United States history, to 1877.
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the chronology involved in this period of United States history.
  • Analyze the roles, contributions, sacrifices, and both the unique and common experiences of the wide variety of people who have been significant in the development of the United States in this period.
  • Assess the major aspects of the institution of slavery and the Atlantic Slave Trade as they relate to the development of the United States. These phenomena will be examined in terms of economics, culture, politics, religion and society.
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the geography of the area under study and offer a hypothesis concerning the role of geography in the development of the United States.
  • Investigate the philosophical reasoning behind and the nature of democratic ideology with a particular emphasis on the philosophical thinking of the framers of the Constitution and their antecedents.
  • Illustrate the relationship between national, state, and local governments and evaluate the effectiveness of the federal system.
  • SLO #2 Demonstrate an understanding of and an appreciation for historiography.
  • Examine methods of organizing and recording information; testing methods; distinguishing fact from opinion; the importance of historical distance, reflection and revision; the use of numerous and sometimes conflicting sources; the use of the past in an attempt to understand the present and speculate about (and prepare) for the future.
  • Research and prepare written work based on extensive use of primary and secondary sources.
  • SLO #3 Demonstrate the mastery of higher level analytical skills.
  • Illustrate the realities of history's interconnectedness through the ability to compare and contrast events, times, individuals.
  • Develop historical themes using events and individuals from vastly different time periods.
  • Evaluate and analyze the connection between events in other parts of the world and developments in the United States.
  • Offer an appraisal of the cyclical nature of history.

HIST 313 History of the United States (1865-1945)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (HIST 313 and 321 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey course on the development and growth of the United States from the end of Reconstruction in 1877 to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the political, economic, social and cultural developments during the designated time period. The course will cover the establishment and evolutionary status of the U.S. as a leading world power. Additionally, the course will address the changes to American society resulting from various revolutionary movements on race, gender, orientation, and labor. Includes coverage of California state and local government.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the key events, individuals, and themes that have shaped United States History from 1877-Present (SLO #1).
  • Illustrate the nature of cause and effect relationships, concepts of continuity and change, the impact of ideas and individuals, and how it is that members of society both shape and are shaped by History.
  • Apply analytical skills in evaluating changes in both domestic and foreign affairs during the course time period (SLO #2).
  • Investigate and critically assess the roles, contributions, sacrifices and both the unique and common experiences of the wide variety of social and ethnic groups who have been significant in the development of the United States in this period.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the historian's methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #3).
  • Analyze different methods in reviewing information and distinguishing fact from bias in an attempt to understand the present and speculate about (and prepare for) the future.
  • Survey and incorporate the chronology and the geography discussed in this course.
  • Compare and contrast both Democrat and Republican Party platforms that evolved during the late 19th to early 21st centuries.
  • Research and compose written work based on primary and secondary source materials.
  • Critique the special role California has played in the growth and development of the United States in this period. Specifically, they will focus on the origins and revision of the California constitution; the nature and processes of state government and their impact on the nation as a whole (i.e. Progressive Era reforms); California’s ethnic and social diversity; California today.

HIST 314 Recent United States History

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey of the development and growth of the United States from the conclusion of World War II in 1945 to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the political, economical, social, and cultural developments of the United States during the designated time period. The course will also address the establishment of the United States as a world power following the Second World War. Finally, particular emphasis will center upon the social and economical conditions of various minority groups, especially African Americans.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of United States History from 1945 to the present (SLO #1).
  • apply analytical skills in evaluating the development of United States foreign policy during the Cold War and the current crusade against terrorism.
  • evaluate and assess the evolution of socio-economical conditions in the United States during course's time period.
  • compare and contrast the development of both Democrat and Republican party platforms of the late 20th and early 21st centuries
  • demonstrate an understanding of the historian's methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #2).
  • survey and incorporate the geography discussed in the class.
  • analyze and describe selected topics from both lectures and required readings.
  • research and compose written work based on extensive research of secondary source materials.

HIST 320 History of the United States: African-American Emphasis

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (HIST 312 and 320 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

U.S. History from the founding of Jamestown in 1607, through the Civil War. The course begins with a brief overview of the Black American's African heritage. It continues with the role played by African-American women as well as men in the growth and development of the nation. The U.S. Constitution and the establishment of American government institutions are also covered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Students will demonstrate a basic knowledge of the key events, individuals, and themes that have shaped United States history, with an African-American to 1865.
  • evaluate the complex interplay between World history and United States history with special emphasis put on the African American experience.
  • identify and critique the crucial role major events and diverse social and ethnic groups have played in the shaping of American history.
  • SLO #2 Students will demonstrate the mastery of higher level analytical skills:
  • develop critical thinking skills particularly in the area of cause and effect and analyze and differentiate between trends in history.
  • investigate the reasoning behind and the nature of democratic ideology with a particular emphasis on the philosophical thinking of the framers of the Constitution and their antecedents.
  • illustrate the relationship between national, state, and local governments and evaluate the effectiveness of the federal system.
  • critique the complex interplay between the historical experience of black people and the large society.
  • develop analytical tools and objective attitudes in dealing with questions of race, ethnicity, class, sex and other controversial issues in U.S. history.

HIST 321 History of the United States: African-American Emphasis

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (HIST 313 and 321 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

U.S. History from 1865 to the present, including coverage of the state and local government, with an increased emphasis on the role of black women as well as men, spelling out their specific contributions in the growth and development of the nation. It includes coverage of California state and local government.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Students will demonstrate a basic knowledge of the key events, individuals, and themes that have shaped United States history,with an African-American Emphasis from 1865 to the present.
  • Evaluate the complex interplay between World history and United States history with special emphasis put on the African American experience.
  • identify and investigate the crucial role major events and certain individuals have played in the shaping of American history.
  • SLO #2 Students will demonstrate the mastery of higher level analytical skills:
  • develop critical thinking skills particularly in the area of cause and effect and the analysis of trends in history.
  • examine and Analyze California history and its crucial role in the growth of the United States; its state constitutional processes and its social diversity with special emphasis put on the African American Experience.
  • Evaluate interplay between the historical experience of black people and the larger society.
  • Integrate analytical tools and objective attitudes in dealing with questions of race, ethnicity, class, sex and other controversial issues in U.S. history.

HIST 331 Women in American History

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D4; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Survey history of the United States from 1607 to the present, emphasizing the economic and social conditions that gave women more actual respect and some public power. Course includes the roles of women in Native American tribes, the English heritage of the colonists, the contributions of women in creating new homes and farms, and the role of women in times of war. Emphasis on the role of women in the three major social issues of the 19th century: labor, abolition, and women's rights. Includes present-day issues and the legacy of how women in the past dealt with similar issues.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Demonstrate an understanding of the basic facts, themes and chronology involved in the account of Women in American History.
  • Critically analyze and compare the experiences of different groups of American women’s lives across time, paying particular attention to the ways that race, class, and ethnicity shaped their experiences.
  • Assess the social, economic, and political arrangements that structured women's status, and how they accepted or challenged these arrangements
  • Investigate and offer an appraisal of gender norms of different eras throughout American history and relate the experiences of women to broader themes in American history.
  • critique the social conditions that granted options to women.
  • SLO #2 Demonstrate an understanding of and appreciation for historiography.
  • Differentiate between methods of organizing and recording information; testing methods; distinguishing fact from opinion; the importance of historical distance, reflection, and revision; the use of numerous and sometimes conflicting sources; the use of the past in an attempt to understand the present and speculate about (and prepare for) the future
  • SLO #3 Demonstrate the mastery of higher level analytical skills.
  • Offer an appraisal of the various historical explanations for women's past experiences, using both primary and secondary sources

HIST 344 Survey of California History: A Multicultural Perspective

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey course on the development and growth of California from its origins to the present time. Particular emphasis will be placed upon California's multicultural heritage and the state's significant local history. The course will examine, compare, and evaluate the historical experiences of Native Californians, Spanish, Mexican, Asian, African, and European Americans. Field trips to local sites of historical significance may be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of California history from its origin to the present day (SLO #1).
  • Apply analytical skills in evaluating the development of California's multicultural history and appraise the contributions of different cultural groups to the state's historical evolution.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the historian's methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #2).
  • Compare and contrast the experiences of various groups as influenced by race, class, gender, nationality, and ethnicity.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the influence of synergistic global forces in California history and evaluate their connections to local and international developments (e.g., European settlement, the US conquest, industrialization, commercialization of agriculture, technological change, civil and human rights struggles, environmental movements, ideological clashes over capitalism and state power, the rise of multinational corporations, etc.).
  • Examine the origins of the California constitution, the constitutional revision in 1878, and Progressive Era reforms, especially the nonpartisan ballot, as well as the initiative, referendum, and recall.
  • Assess the role of California's geography on its historical development.

HIST 360 History of African Civilizations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introductory survey of the history of Africa from earliest times to the present. Major topics will include origins of humanity and society, civilizations of the Nile Valley, the peopling of Sub-Saharan Africa, African societies to 1500 A.D. , precolonial Saharan and Sub-Saharan Africa, colonial Africa and the emergence of modern state in Africa.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Students will demonstrate a basic knowledge of the key events, individuals, and themes that have shaped African Civilizations.
  • Form a hypothesis concerning the profound influence the past has had on the present.
  • Critique civilizations that have been developed by non-literate societies and be able to differentiate between their contributions and those of literate societies.
  • Evaluate the meaning and the definitions of history, civilization, culture, and the impact of cultural evolution and cultural diffusion as well as the environment influence on cultural development.
  • demonstrate the integration of the outside contacts on the African Continent and the complex interplay of African history and World history.
  • SLO #2 Students will demonstrate the mastery of higher level analytical skills:
  • Investigate the reality of the contributions of African Societies to global history and world civilizations
  • demonstrate critical thinking, particularly in the area of cause and effect and the analysis of trends in history.

HIST 364 Asian Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey of Asian History from the birth of civilization to 1600 C.E. With particular emphasis on East Asia, the course will evaluate the political, economical, social, and cultural developments of China, Japan, and Korea. Additional topics will include the effects of foreign interactions with peoples from India, the Middle East, and Europe.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of East Asian civilizations from the birth of such civilizations to the 17th century C.E. (SLO #1).
  • evaluate and assess Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and other East Asian civilizations through the use of critical thinking skills.
  • differentiate the diverse political and economical structures of each group covered in the course.
  • compare and contrast the common and diverse cultures of East Asian peoples.
  • utilize analytical skills in evaluating the effects of foreign ideas and religions on East Asian peoples.
  • survey and incorporate the geography discussed in the class.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the historians' methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #2).
  • analyze and describe selected topics from both lectures and required readings.
  • research and prepare written work based on extensive research of secondary source materials.

HIST 365 Asian Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a survey of Asian History from 1600 C.E. to the present. With particular emphasis on China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, the course will evaluate the political, economical, social, and cultural effects of Western involvement in East Asia. Additional topics will include the rise of nationalism in East Asia during the Cold War, as well as China's rising participation in world events.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of East Asian civilizations from the 17th century C.E. to the present (SLO #1).
  • evaluate and assess Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and other East Asian civilizations through the use of critical thinking skills.
  • differentiate the diverse political and economical structures of each group covered in the course.
  • compare and contrast the common and diverse cultures of East Asian peoples.
  • utilize analytical skills in evaluating the effects of Western imperialism and ideologies on East Asian peoples.
  • survey and incorporate the geography discussed in the class.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the historian,s methods in reconstructing the past using primary and secondary sources (SLO #2).
  • analyze and describe selected topics from both lectures and required readings.
  • research and compose written work based on extensive research of secondary source materials.

HIST 370 History of the Americas through the 19th Century Wars of Independence

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a general historical survey of North, Central, and South America from the earliest civilizations through to the 19th century wars of independence. The focus is on the roles played by political, economic, cultural, and religious forces in shaping the western hemisphere.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the history of the Americas to the 19th century wars of independence by comparing the diverse political and economical structures of each civilization and/or nation covered in the course (SLO #1).
  • evaluate and interpret primary and secondary sources to better understand the historian's methods in reconstructing the past (SLO #2).
  • demonstrate mastery of higher level analytical skills to recognize the historical process of cause and effect. (SLO #3)
  • evaluate key events, social groups, and various colonial institutions.
  • analyze the differences between and the effects of the Anglo-American and Ibero-American process of colonization on indigenous peoples.

HIST 371 History of the Americas from the 19th Century Wars of Independence to the Present

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a general historical survey of North, Central, and South America from the wars of independence to the present day. Special emphasis is placed on a review of the North American colonies, the road to revolution, independence from England, and the constitutional period as well as subsequent Latin American - United States relations. This course satisfies the state requirements in United States history.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the history of the Americas from the 19th century wars of independence to the present day by comparing the diverse political and economical structures of each civilization and/or nation covered in the course (SLO #1).
  • evaluate and interpret primary and secondary sources to better understand the historian's methods in reconstructing the past (SLO #2).
  • demonstrate mastery of higher level analytical skills to recognize the historical process of cause and effect. (SLO #3)
  • analyze the marginalization and disenfranchisement of disadvantaged groups in various North, Central, and South American countries.
  • examine how Central and South American nations have and continue to be affected by the United States' heightened involvement in the western hemisphere.

HIST 373 History of Mexico

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

History 373 is a survey course on the origins and development of Mexico from c. 2500 BCE to the present. In addition to discussing the early civilizations of Mesoamerica, the course will evaluate the political, economical, social, and cultural evolution of Mexico from the colonial era to the present day. Finally, Mexico's relationship with the United States and other western powers will be addressed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the history of Mexico from the earliest Mesoamerican civilizations to the present day by comparing the key events, individuals, and themes that helped shape Mexican history from Mesoamerican heritage to the present (SLO #1).
  • discover and appreciate the cultural heritage of Mexico and its impact on the United States southwest.
  • summarize the impact on Mexico regarding the strong presence of the U.S. in the western hemisphere.
  • explain the role of geography in the development of Mexico as nation.
  • evaluate and interpret primary and secondary sources to better understand the historian's methods in reconstructing the past (SLO #2).
  • exhibit mastery of higher level analytical skills to recognize the historical process of cause and effect. (SLO #3)

HIST 380 History of the Middle East

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course surveys the history of the Middle East and North Africa with emphasis on the period from the 6th century C.E. (A.D.) to the present. The course focuses on the major social, economic, political and cultural transformations of the region, while taking into account both regional and global contexts of interaction and change in a comparative format. This course will provide students with a historical understanding of the impact of European colonialism, the discovery of petroleum and its consequences, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and the role played by the United States in the region.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DESCRIBE AND ANALYZE THE ANCIENT HISTORICAL CONTEXT OF THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA. - SLO 1
  • In particular examine those aspects of the cultures of late antiquity which impacted the subsequent development of the region in pre-Islamic times, then in the earliest days of Islam, followed by the Arab/Islamic conquests of the 7th century C.E.
  • ANALYZE THE DEVELOPMENT OF CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA FROM THE 6TH CENTURY C.E. TO CONTEMPORARY TIMES. - SLO 2.
  • Study and examine urban cultures during Rashidun times, the Classical Age of Islam in the Middle East, Andalusian and Maghrebi Muslim periods, Safavid, Seljuk and Ottoman Empires.
  • IDENTIFY AND RECOGNIZE THE CONTRIBUTIONS AND INTERACTIONS OF DIFFERENT CULTURAL GROUPS TO MIDDLE EASTERN AND NORTH AFRICAN HISTORY. - SLO 3.
  • Compare, contrast, and integrate the rich multicultural composition of Middle Eastern and North African societies and peoples, for example, Arabs, Iranians, Berbers, Turks, Kurds, Mauritanians, Spaniards, as well as religious groups, Muslims, and minority groups such as Christians and Jews.
  • CRITIQUE, EXAMINE, UNDERSTAND AND APPRECIATE THE HISTORICAL INTERACTIONS OF PEOPLE IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA WITH PEOPLES AND CULTURES IN OTHER PARTS OF AFRICA, EUROPE AND ASIA BETWEEN THE 7TH CENTURY C.E. THROUGH THE POST-COLONIAL PERIOD. - SLO 4.
  • Analyze and assess travel and trade, communication networks, cultural explorations and writers of the culture.
  • DEVELOP CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS NECESSARY FOR FORMULATING AN ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK RELEVANT TO THE STUDY OF THE HISTORY OF THE REGION. - SLO 5.
  • Research topics and write evaluative essays, papers, and reports.
  • Compare, contrast, synthesize and analyze current regional historical issues in light of past history.
  • Explore cross-cultural comparative aspects of Middle Eastern and North African history.
  • EXAMINE, ANALYZE, AND WRITE ON THE ROLE OF THE GLOBAL ECONOMY, NATURAL RESOURCES, AND GEOPOLITICAL CONSIDERATIONS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MODERN NATIONS OF THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA. - SLO 6.
  • Compose evaluative essays, papers and reports.

HIST 485 Recent United States History - Honors

  • Same As:HONOR 366
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to students that are eligible for the Cosumnes River College Honors Program.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the study of American history from 1945 to the present day. It is an honors course that uses an intensive instructional methodology designed to challenge motivated students and cultivate advanced critical thinking skills. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role played by complex interrelationships of political, economic, social, and cultural forces in United States history after World War II, and the role played by multiple ethnic groups as well. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 314. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as HONOR 366 and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • ANALYZE REASONING PROCESSES TO EVALUATE ISSUES, VALUE JUDGMENTS, OR CONCLUSIONS THAT DETERMINE THE QUALITY, VALIDITY, AND /OR RELIABILITY OF INFORMATION (SLO #1).
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts through written assignments.
  • Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of a major discipline of study through oral presentations and class discussions.
  • Explain the importance of historical consciousness of the major discipline of study in understanding the broader picture of society through a final project.
  • APPLY COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AS SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS (SLO #2).
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information in the form of primary documents.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY THROUGH READING PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES (SLO #3).
  • Generate significant open-ended questions about United States history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments and perspectives that inform one’s own life.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between United States history and global history to foster active citizenship as well as applying historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues.
  • Identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history since 1945.
  • Evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances.

HIST 495 Independent Studies in History

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.