Geography

Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Concurrent enrollment in GEOG 301 (Physical Geography Lab) is suggested. GEOG 301 meets the UC and CSU transfer requirement for a 1-unit science lab.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course investigates the interrelationships between Earth and humans, with an emphasis on natural systems (solar energy balance, weather and climate, water resources, landforms, natural hazards, vegetation, and soil). Relevant application of these elements to today's world is stressed to help students better understand Earth's physical environment as well as human-environment interaction. A field trip may be required to relate class discussions to the real world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <b>SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE MAJOR MODES OF GEOGRAPHIC INQUIRY AND TOOLS USED FOR GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS.</b> <li>1. Describe how the scientific method and spatial analysis are used to research topics in physical geography.</li> <li>2. Demonstrate how to locate places on Earth using the geographic grid (latitude and longitude).</li> <li>3. Discuss several methods used to collect geographic data as well as several tools used to visualize and analyze this data.</li> <li>4. Demonstrate the ability to interpret maps and mapped data.</li>
  • <b>SLO 2: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF HOW EARTH'S FOUR MAJOR OPEN SYSTEMS WORK AND INTERACT WITH ONE ANOTHER.</b> <li>1. Explain latitudinal variation in energy receipt and how this relates to global patterns of temperature, precipitation, weather & climate, vegetation, wildlife habitat, etc.</li> <li>2. Diagram important physical processes (e.g., anticyclonic and cyclonic circulation, the global atmospheric circulation model, local & regional winds, the hydrologic cycle, the rock cycle, types of plate boundaries, etc.).</li> <li>3. Outline how processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere interact to create Earth's biosphere.</li>
  • <b>SLO 3: RECOGNIZE AND EXPLAIN THE LOCATION OF MAJOR PHYSICAL FEATURES ON EARTH.</b> <li>1. Locate and identify the major significant physical features in California and elsewhere in the world.</li> <li>2. Apply knowledge of the hydrologic cycle, the rock cycle, Plate Tectonics, and other geomorphic processes to explain the location and formation of Earth's major landforms and natural hazards.</li>
  • <b>SLO 4: PRODUCE A RESEARCH PROJECT (E.G., ACADEMIC POSTER, TERM PAPER, OR SIMILAR PRODUCT) ON A COURSE-RELATED THEME.</b> <li>1. Research information from multiple sources (maps, books, periodicals, Internet, interviews, etc.)</li> <li>2. Synthesize findings in written format and document sources using an approved in-text citation method with references listed in standard bibliographic format.</li>
  • <b>SLO 5: RECOGNIZE THE IMPORTANCE OF, AND THINK CRITICALLY ABOUT, GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION RELEVANT TO LIFE ON EARTH.</b> <li>1. Analyze the role of humans in modifying Earth's physical environment as well as the environment's role in shaping human activities.</li> <li>2. Evaluate the personal and societal implications of current geographic issues (e.g. climate change, ozone depletion, sea-level rise, pollution, natural hazards, etc.)</li>

GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:GEOG 300; GEOG 300 may be taken during a previous semester. Grade of "C" or better required if taken previously.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 111
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides "hands-on" study of the basic principles and concepts involved in understanding Earth's environment systems. Labs feature observation, collection, analysis and display of data related to the study of Earth's energy balance, weather and climate, vegetation, tectonic processes, landforms, and natural hazards. Additionally, labs involve geographic methods and technology, including interpretation of maps and other geographic imagery, weather instrumentation, navigation equipment such as a compass and the Global Positioning System (GPS), and other relevant computer and Internet applications. A field trip may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1: Collect, measure, and/or analyze geographic data using common instruments.
  • Measure angular distance north/south of the Equator and east/west of the Prime Meridian in order to specify precise geographic coordinates on a map and/or globe.
  • Collect and analyze data using common meteorological instruments (e.g. thermometer, anemometer, barometer, sling psychrometer, etc.), geomorphic instruments (e.g. stereoscopic imagery), and navigational instruments (e.g. compass, Global Positioning System (GPS) unit).
  • Calculate unit conversions for various types of data (e.g. angular and linear distance, temperature, air pressure, etc.).
  • SLO #2: Interpret and analyze geographic information using maps (thematic, regional, and topographic).
  • Define the concepts of map scale and projection and explain how these concepts affect the way that geographic information is represented on maps and/or globes.
  • Analyze global, regional, and/or local temperature, atmospheric pressure maps, and synoptic-scale weather maps and explain reasons for observed patterns.
  • Interpret elevation data shown on a topographic map and use this information to construct a topographic profile for an area.
  • Analyze and describe geomorphic processes and landforms using topographic maps.
  • SLO#3: Explain geographic processes which act upon and shape Earth's physical environment.
  • Explain how and why the amount of solar insolation received on Earth varies by latitude and relate how this affects life processes.
  • Apply concepts related to atmospheric and geomorphic processes to predict impacts on Earth's physical and human environments.
  • Identify types of landforms created by endogenic processes (e.g. volcanic and tectonic activity) and exogenic processes (e.g. weathering, erosion, and deposition).
  • SLO#4: Compare and contrast local geographic data with other locations at regional, national and global scales.
  • Construct climographs for Sacramento, various other locations in CA, the U.S. and the world and identify factors responsible for observed climatic differences.
  • Analyze meteorologic and geomorphic patterns in Sacramento, CA, the U.S., and the world and explain why these phenomena are observed where they are found.

GEOG 302 Environmental Studies & Sustainability

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D5; CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4E; IGETC Area 4G
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This introductory course offers an interdisciplinary perspective on the major environmental problems confronting society and explores solutions directed toward producing a more sustainable future. Course topics include an introduction to environmental issues, and related values, ethics and politics; a primer on Earth system science — the interconnected nature of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere; a global survey of natural resources and exploitation; changing global climates; the world water crisis; the demography of human population, and contrasts between less- and more-developed countries; agricultural and food supply challenges; renewable and nonrenewable energy resources; and land use patterns and related issues. Throughout the course, human impacts on the environment, environmental impacts on human societies, and the sustainability of economies and practices at local, regional, and global scales are investigated. A field trip may be required to relate class discussions to the real world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <b><i>SLO-1: Articulate an understanding of the natural environment and human societies’ relationship to it. This includes the ability to:</i></b>
  • 1. Communicate effectively about environmental issues and sustainability, correctly utilizing vocabulary while demonstrating understanding of topics studied.
  • 2. Explain the relevance of environmental issues to the student’s life and wider community at local, regional, and global scales.<P ...>
  • <b><i>SLO-2: Evaluate and analyze human impacts on the natural environment. This includes the ability to:</i></b>
  • 1. Analyze critical environmental problems facing the world today, recognizing the interconnections between humans, their activities, and resulting effects on the environment.
  • 2. Evaluate data and draw reasonable conclusions.
  • 3. Employ information-gathering tools to investigate environmental issues.
  • 4. Investigate and formulate sustainable solutions to environmental problems.<P ...>
  • <b><i>SLO-3: Recognize the ethical dimensions of decisions and actions and engage in the ethical reasoning necessary to be a responsible local and global citizen. This includes the ability to:</i></b>
  • 1. Recognize the ethical implications of environmental problems.
  • 2. Articulate the value of understanding environmental systems and problems.<P ...>

GEOG 305 Global Climate Change

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This interdisciplinary course explores the natural and human factors causing the Earth’s climate to change. Students will be provided with the scientific tools to analyze evidence that climate change is a looming threat. Through lectures, readings, discussions and projects, students will examine the Earth’s present and past climates as well as the influence of climate on the geographical distribution of plants, animals and human societies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <b>SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PHYSICAL FACTORS AFFECTING CLIMATE AND THE RESULTING GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION OF ENERGY RECEIPT, TEMPERATURE, PRECIPITATION, AND BIOMES.</b> <li>1. Explain the factors responsible for the latitudinal variation in energy receipt and its effects on global temperature and precipitation patterns.</li> <li>2. Diagram the global energy balance, accounting for major sources of input and outputs, heat exchange and absorption.</li> <li>3. Describe the various layers of the atmosphere and explain their role in producing the Greenhouse Effect and anthropogenic global warming.</li> <li>4. Apply knowledge of meteorology as well as global oceanic circulation to hypothesize how terrestrial and marine biotic communities may be impacted by climate change.</li>
  • <b>SLO 2: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF HOW CLIMATE INFLUENCES THE DISTRIBUTION OF LIVING ORGANISMS.</b> <li>1. Explain the factors that determine the geographic distribution of the principal biomes.</li> <li>2. Discuss the importance of physiological tolerance and species interactions in the structure, diversity, and stability of communities.</li> <li>3. Use data from paleoclimatology to demonstrate how the geographic ranges of organisms may be affected by climate shifts.</li> <li>4. Apply knowledge of the carbon cycle to explain the physical and biology factors that influence carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.</li> <li>5. Outline how increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may affect the acidity of oceans and the structure of marine communities.</li>
  • <b>SLO 3: APPLY SCIENTIFIC REASONING TO ASSESS THE EVIDENCE FOR HUMAN-INDUCED CLIMATE CHANGE.</b> <li>1. Describe how scientists collect data to determine the history of the earth’s climate and biogeography.</li> <li>2. Outline how the study of paleoclimatology helps scientists predict future changes.</li> <li>3. Present data that support and data that contradict the argument that current climate change is primarily due to human activities in contrast to natural forces.</li>
  • <b>SLO 4: ANALYZE THE COMPLEXITIES AND DIFFICULTIES IN CONSTRUCTING CLIMATE CHANGE MODELS.</b> <li>1. Diagram feedback loops involving atmospheric carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, albedo, photosynthesis, temperature, cloud cover, pollution, and other related variables.</li> <li>2. Discuss the reasons why it is difficult to predict future climate change.</li>
  • <b>SLO 5: UNDERSTAND HOW CLIMATE CHANGE MAY AFFECT THEIR LIVES AND THE FUTURE OF LIFE ON EARTH.</b> <li>1. Describe the major principles of recent climate policies and discuss their limitations.</li> <li>2. Identify how global warming may affect weather extremes, incidence of wildfires, availability of water, agriculture, human disease patterns, settlement patterns, economic, political stability, and other aspects of human society.</li> <li>3. Outline effective short term and long term strategies for mitigating the effects of climate change.</li>

GEOG 306 Weather and Climate

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:MATH 30, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; IGETC Area 5A
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to atmospheric processes including energy and moisture exchanges, atmospheric pressure, winds, and global circulation. Severe weather conditions such as hurricanes and tornadoes are also studied. World, regional, and local climates are investigated. Student work will include weather observations and analysis of atmospheric data using charts, weather maps and radar and satellite imagery from the Internet and other sources.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <p><b>SLO#1: INTERPRET, ANALYZE, AND DISPLAY ATMOSPHERIC DATA.</b><br/>1. Demonstrate the ability to graph and/or map atmospheric data and explain its significance.</p>
  • <p><b>SLO#2: DETAIL THE PROCESSES OF ENERGY EXCHANGE WITHIN THE EARTH-ATMOSPHERE SYSTEM.</b><br/>1. Draw a simplified diagram explaining Earth's energy balance and explain the energy flows portrayed.<p/>
  • <p><b>SLO#3: DESCRIBE ATMOSPHERIC HUMIDITY PROCESSES, SPECIFICALLY THOSE INVOLVING PHASE CHANGES OF WATER.</b><br/>1. Explain atmospheric energy exchange associated with the phase changes of water (latent heat exchange).<p/>
  • <p><b>SLO#4: EXPLAIN WHY AND WHERE PRECIPITATION OCCURS, INCLUDING SOURCES OF MOISTURE, LIFTING MECHANISMS, ADIABATIC PROCESSES, AND CLOUD/PRECIPITATION FORMATION.</b><br/>1. Describe moisture sources and the steps necessary for condensation.<br/>2. Diagram and explain atmospheric lifting mechanisms (frontal, orographic, convergent, and convectional).<br/>3. Identify the global and regional geographic regions where precipitation is more/less likely to occur and explain why.<br/>4. Predict where cloud formation is likely to occur using knowledge of atmospheric instability and adiabatic processes.<p/>
  • <p><b>SLO#5: COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE DYNAMICS OF SEVERE WEATHER SYSTEMS, INCLUDING THUNDERSTORMS, HURRICANES, AND TORNADOES.</b><br/>1. Explain the commonalities and differences among severe weather systems.<br/>2. Identify the geographic locations most susceptible to these types of storms and explain why.<p/>
  • <p><b>SLO#6: CLASSIFY AND INTERPRET ATMOSPHERIC DATA IN ORDER TO DESCRIBE CLIMATIC VARIATION OVER EARTH'S SURFACE.</b><br/>1. Use the Köppen-Geiger Climate Classification System to classify and describe global climate patterns.<br/>2. Describe California's climate and locate the four other places in the world with a similar climate.<p/>
  • <p><b>SLO#7: DISCUSS THE MECHANISMS OF CLIMATE CHANGE (BOTH NATURAL AND ANTHROPOGENIC), ITS IMPACTS AND POTENTIAL SOLUTIONS.</b><br/>1. Define the greenhouse effect, greenhouse gases, and climate change.<br/>2. Provide examples of natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change.<br/>3. Discuss current evidence for anthropogenic global warming, list examples of its impacts, and provide suggestions for mitigation and adaptation.<p/>

GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D5; IGETC Area 4E
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course investigates the diverse patterns of human settlement, development, and movement on earth, which evolved as a result of cultural and environmental factors. Emphasis is placed on understanding global population and migration patterns, language, religion, ethnicity, political and economic systems, development issues, agriculture and urbanization.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <p><b> SLO1: Analyze human's role in transforming Earth's surface into a series of distinctive cultural landscapes.</b><br/>1. Explain the significance of the major stages of human cultural evolution over time (i.e. agricultural, industrial, medical, and technological revolutions).<p/>
  • <p><b> SLO2: Propose explanations for the geographic origin and global diffusion of key aspects of culture (e.g. technology, language, religion, ethnocentrism, racism, agriculture, urbanization).</b><br/>1. Differentiate between relocation and expansion diffusion as mechanisms for spreading cultural traits.<br/>2. Explain the role of globalization as an accelerator of cultural diffusion.<p/>
  • <p><b> SLO3: Describe broad historical and modern global socioeconomic processes such as migration, colonization, and globalization.</b><br/> 1. Explain how these processes relate to spatial patterns today, such as ethnicity, unequal development, poverty, conflict, and environmental degradation.<p/>
  • <p><b> SLO4: Recognize and appreciate patterns of cultural diversity in California, the U.S., and the world.</b><br/>1. Describe patterns of diversity and explain how these enrich local, regional, and global culture.<p/>
  • <p><b> SLO5: Demonstrate understanding of key geographic concepts such as diffusion and globalization by analyzing and explaining spatial patterns represented on maps.</b><br/>1. Interpret maps of various types of socioeconomic data (e.g. demographic, linguistic, religious, ethnic, AIDS incidence, GNP per capita, etc.) and explain their significance.<p/>
  • <p><b> SLO6: Communicate geographic information effectively in oral, written, and/or graphic form.</b><br/>1. Produce a significant research project (e.g. academic poster, term paper, or similar product) on a course-related theme.<p/>

GEOG 320 World Regional Geography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D5; IGETC Area 4E
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 125
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a global survey of the world's major geographic realms: their physical environments, cultures and economies; their origins, interactions and global roles. Geographic concepts and ideas are used to study and compare cultures, landscapes, resources, livelihood and land use across Earth. Explanation for the globalization of culture and economy, the widening gap between rich and poor countries, and ethnic diversity in the United States and abroad is stressed throughout the course. A major goal of this course is to improve each student's "mental map of the world."

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <p><b> SLO1: Recognize the diversity of peoples, places, and events globally as well as within specific geographic regions.</b><br/>1. Generalize the special combination of cultural, physical, historical, economical, and organizational qualities that characterize each of the major geographic regions of the world (such as East Asia, North America, SubSaharan Africa, etc.).<p>
  • <p><b>SLO2: Evaluate and analyze critical geographic issues facing regions of the world today.</b><br/>1. Identify major socioeconomic, political, and/or environmental issues currently affecting Earth's major geographic regions.</p>
  • <p><b> SLO3: Use and interpret maps effectively to build geographic understanding of the world.</b><br/> 1. Recognize and identify the world's major geographic regions, as well as all countries located within them, on a blank outline map.</p>
  • <p><b> SLO4: Communicate geographic information effectively in oral, written, and/or graphic form.</b><br/>1. Produce a significant research project (e.g. academic poster, term paper, or similar product) on a course-related theme.</p>

GEOG 322 Geography of California

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D5; IGETC Area 4E
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course investigates California's physical, cultural, and economic environments, analyzing cardinal changes resulting from both natural and human interaction. The emphasis is on cultural diversity, human alteration of the landscape, and contemporary problems resulting from accelerated competition for natural, financial, and human resources.
Some field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <b>SLO #1: demonstrate understanding of California's physical and human environments, their interconnections, and the geographic processes that form and change them. </b>
  • Objective 1.1: expound of several examples of the influence of the environment on the human population and the human influence on the environment.
  • Objective 1.2: describe the change of the environment and human population over time.
  • <b>SLO #2: analyze and interpret geographic information at local, regional, and/or global scales.</b>
  • Objective 2.1: identify and explain the influence of cultures and ideas from around the world on the State and regions within California.
  • Objective 2.2: apply basic principles of the physical environment to interpret California's environmental phenomena.
  • <b>SLO #3: analyze and evaluate critical geographic issues, their ethical dimensions, and their influence on decision-making. </b>
  • Objective 3.1: describe both perspectives on several ethical issues facing California and propose some solutions.
  • <b>SLO #4: recognize, appreciate, and understand the geographic diversity of people, places, and events specific to California.</b>
  • <b>SLO #5: communicate geographic information effectively in oral, written, and graphic form.</b>
  • Objective 5.1: develop one or several projects illustrating an understanding of California geography.

GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:48 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Maps are the most effective way to communicate spatial information. This course introduces students to the quickly changing world of maps (both hardcopy and digital) and geographic techniques and technologies such as map and aerial photograph interpretation, spreadsheet operations, basic statistics, cartography, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), Internet mapping, remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) that aid in data collection, analysis and presentation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE MAJOR MODES OF GEOGRAPHIC INQUIRY.
  • discuss how the scientific method and spatial analysis are used to research topics in geography.
  • recognize the potential for misuse of data, whether accidental or intentional, and its consequences.
  • SLO #2: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF MAPPING CONCEPTS AND THE ABILITY TO INTERPRET MAPS AND MAPPED DATA.
  • determine basic geographic information (e.g. location, distance and direction) using various map scales, coordinate systems, and projections.
  • create, analyze, critique, and interpret data using maps, aerial photographs and satellite imagery.
  • demonstrate basic proficiency in traditional and technology-based cartographic skills.
  • SLO #3: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF COMMON GEOGRAPHIC TECHNOLOGIES AND THE ABILITY TO USE THEM TO COLLECT, ANALYZE, AND DISPLAY GEOSPATIAL DATA.
  • critically analyze mapping applications and technologies commonly used in today's society.
  • collect, import and display geospatial data within a GIS.
  • use a GPS unit for basic navigation purposes.
  • SLO #4: ORGANIZE, MANIPULATE, ANALYZE AND DISPLAY TABULAR DATA INTO SPATIAL VISUALIZATIONS.
  • create and manipulate tabular data using common spreadsheet software (e.g. Excel).
  • conduct basic statistical analysis of numeric data, assess validity, and display results.

GEOG 335 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications

  • Units:3
  • Hours:45 hours LEC; 27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:CISC 302
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 155
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are computer-based mapping programs that analyze spatial data. This course provides the foundation for using desktop GIS software. A conceptual overview along with hands-on experience will be used to explore basic GIS software functionality. Emphasis will be placed on display characteristics, attribute querying, database exploration and management, spatial analysis, data creation, and cartographic presentation.

This course is not open to students who have received credit for GEOG 335.1, 335.2, and 335.3.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: demonstrate an understanding of GIS technologies, theories and practices
  • Describe and assess fundamental aspects of geographic information and scale, with specific reference to raster and vector digital spatial data models used to represent such information.
  • Compile, compare, and evaluate various types of spatial data, with specific attention to geospatial metadata, data quality, and identification of the most appropriate data type for use in a specific GIS application.
  • Compare and contrast the variety of available coordinate systems, map projections, and datums, and choose the appropriate variety for a specific GIS application.
  • Compare and contrast the effectiveness of various GIS output products, including maps, tables, charts, and other digital output for specific applications.
  • Describe, assess, and compare common map elements and the cartographic design process.
  • SLO #2: apply GIS technical skills in a professional setting
  • Originate, classify, edit, and manage digital spatial data using various techniques (e.g., manual, scan, and on-screen digitizing, computer-assisted drafting, GPS).
  • Design, synthesize, validate, optimize, and manage spatial attribute tables and databases.
  • Apply appropriate data normalization and classification schemes to attribute data.
  • Formulate geoprocessing and analysis functions that are appropriate for specific applications, and be able to perform and evaluate the results of such processes (such as buffering, overlay, reclassification, address matching, and statistical analysis).
  • SLO #3: exhibit skills learned via GIS project development.
  • Synthesize, design, apply, and manage a GIS project, including estimates of time and labor requirements.
  • Design, create, and disseminate high-quality maps in both hard-copy (paper) and digital (on-screen) form.
  • List and describe several career options for GIS professionals.
  • SLO #4: cultivate spatial analysis and critical thinking skills for decision-making purposes.
  • SLO #5: understand how GIS skills are applicable in specific career fields.

GEOG 353 Introduction to the Global Positioning System (GPS)

  • Units:1
  • Hours:16 hours LEC; 6 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the Global Positioning System (GPS). Topics include basic concepts of GPS including hands-on operation of the technology, real-world applications, computer interfaces, GIS and other mapping software. A field trip may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <b>SLO 1: Demonstrate competent use of GPS technology and function</b>
  • Evaluate GPS receiver operation for positioning and navigation
  • Design and implement field data collection for mapping
  • <b>SLO 2: Integrate GPS data into computer mapping applications</b>
  • Describe GPS in relation to basic geographic information system (GIS) concepts
  • Describe the procedure for downloading and uploading GPS data to and from a computer
  • Create maps of GPS data using computer software

GEOG 390 Field Studies in Geography

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in the field. Course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and/or introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field trip(s) are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <b>SLO 1: APPLY BASIC PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY TO OBSERVATIONS IN THE FIELD</b>
  • Develop observational skills in the field.
  • Explain any evidence of human-environmental interactions observed in the field and discuss its implications.
  • Understand the roles of biotic and abiotic elements within specific ecosystems.
  • <b>SLO 2: UTILIZE INVESTIGATIONS, OBSERVATIONS AND READINGS TO DEVELOP A GREATER DEPTH OF UNDERSTANDING OF GEOGRAPHIC PRINCIPLES. </b>
  • Compare knowledge gained from readings and lectures to field observations.
  • Utilize appropriate information sources to increase knowledge of one aspect of the course topic.
  • <b>SLO 3:COMMUNICATE KNOWLEDGE GAINED IN THIS COURSE EFFECTIVELY IN ORAL, WRITTEN, AND/OR GRAPHIC FORM </b>

GEOG 391 Field Studies in Geography: Mountain Landscapes

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in mountain environments. The course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field excursions are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: demonstrate skill of gaining and applying learned material in a field experience.
  • apply concepts and processes discussed in lecture to experiences in the field.
  • compose field notes and collect and analyze field data.
  • SLO 2: explain physical and/or cultural phenomena of a specific region.
  • describe and explain physical and/or cultural phenomena of a specific region.
  • integrate geographic information from various disciplines (geology, biology, ecology, urban studies, anthropology, history, economics, cultural studies, and others) in order to explain landscape patterns and processes.

GEOG 392 Field Studies in Geography: Coastal Landscapes

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID GEOG 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a field studies course of the geography of coastal landscapes. Physical and cultural processes, characteristics and landscapes will be observed and analyzed. Specific content will vary by geographic region. A field trip is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <b>SLO 1: demonstrate skills of gaining and applying learned material in a field experience. </b>
  • apply concepts and processes discussed in lecture to experiences in the field.
  • compose field notes and collect and analyze field data.
  • <b>SLO 2: explain physical and/or cultural phenomena of a specific region. </b>
  • describe and explain geographic phenomena related to the particular physical and/or human environments under study.
  • integrate geographic information from various disciplines (geology, biology, ecology, urban studies, anthropology, history, economics, cultural studies, and others) in order to explain landscape patterns and processes.

GEOG 393 Field Studies in Geography: Arid Landscapes

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in arid environments. The course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field excursions are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: demonstrate skill of gaining and applying learned material in a field experience.
  • apply concepts and processes discussed in lecture to experiences in the field.
  • compose field notes and collect and analyze field data.
  • SLO 2: explain physical and/or cultural phenomena of a specific region.
  • describe and explain physical and/or cultural phenomena of a specific region.
  • integrate geographic information from various disciplines (geology, biology, ecology, urban studies, anthropology, history, economics, cultural studies, and others) in order to explain landscape patterns and processes.

GEOG 394 Field Studies in Geography: Volcanic Landscapes

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:6 - 24 hours LEC; 36 - 144 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves the study of geographic principles and processes in volcanic environments. The course content will vary by destination but may include topics in physical geography (e.g., plant and animal communities, climate and weather, geology and geomorphology, natural hazards, environmental impacts, etc.), human geography (e.g., cultural landscapes, economic activities, transportation issues, land use patterns, etc.), and introduction to tools and techniques used for geographic field research (e.g., map and compass use, the Global Positioning System (GPS), Geographic Information Systems (GIS), etc.). Field excursions are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: demonstrate skills of gaining and applying learned material in a field experience.
  • apply concepts and processes discussed in lecture to experiences in the field.
  • compose field notes and collect and analyze field data.
  • SLO 2: explain physical and/or cultural phenomena of a specific region.
  • describe and explain geographic phenomena related to the particular physical and/or human environments under study.
  • integrate geographic information from various disciplines (geology, biology, ecology, urban studies, anthropology, history, economics, cultural studies, and others) in order to explain landscape patterns and processes.

GEOG 495 Independent Studies in Geography

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • <b>SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study.</b>
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study with a supervising instructor in Geography or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or Environmental Studies.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Gather data or information needed for analysis in Geography or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or Environmental Studies.
  • <b>SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in Geography or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or Environmental Studies to significant problems and/or educational activities.</b>
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in Geography or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or Environmental Studies.
  • <b>SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of Geography or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or Environmental Studies</b>.
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • Present the results of your research or inquiry.

Geography, A.S. Degree

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Geography, A.A.-T Degree

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Geography, A.A.-T Degree, IGETC

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Geography, Environmental Studies and Sustainability, A.S. Degree

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Geography, Field Data Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Certificate of Achievement

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Geography, Professional Applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Certificate of Achievement

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Geography, Sustainability, Certificate of Achievement

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