Engineering

Engineering (ENGR)

ENGR 300 Introduction to Engineering

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will provide students with information to evaluate the engineering profession as a personal career choice. Students will explore the branches of engineering and the different types of work that engineers do. Participants will investigate personal characteristics which contribute to being happy and successful engineers, and will examine their own traits. They will learn what preparation is needed and strategies for successful completion. Course participants will appreciate the role of engineers in society and understand the responsibilities of engineers in their service to society.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1 – DESCRIBE ASPECTS OF ENGINEERING AS A PROFESSION
  • describe different branches of engineering
  • describe different types of work functions performed by engineers
  • explain the responsibility of engineers to their clients
  • SLO#2 – ASSESS ENGINEERING AS A SUITABLE PERSONAL CAREER CHOICE
  • investigate personal characteristics which contribute to satisfaction and success in engineering and compare them to their own traits
  • SLO#3 – UNDERSTAND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR BECOMING AN ENGINEER
  • ascertain the requirements for different engineering majors at different universities
  • create a personal education plan to become an engineer
  • describe and perform behaviors that will support success in becoming an engineer

ENGR 304 How Things Work

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:MATH 100
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B1; CSU Area B3
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers how everyday things and technologies operate and is designed primarily for non-science students or anyone interested in learning about technology. The basic scientific principles behind the technology will be explored. Systems studied will include mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical and others. Students will gain hands-on experience with basic machines and technologies during lab.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • APPLY THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD TO DEMONSTRATE HOW MODERN TECHNOLOGY WORKS AND IS DEVELOPED. (SLO 1)
  • identify the scientific principles used in common engineering systems.
  • CONSTRUCT A SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS OF AN ENGINEERING SYSTEM THAT THE STUDENT ENCOUNTERS ROUTINELY. (SLO 2)
  • analyze a system and break it down into simpler components and explain how the components interface to create a desired result.
  • Build basic machines or technologies and investigate hands-on how things function
  • DEMONSTRATE AN INCREASED SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL LITERACY, INCLUDING AN INCREASED TECHNICAL VOCABULARY. (SLO 3)
  • critique common scientific misconceptions regarding technology.
  • SOLVE ENGINEERING PROBLEMS THAT REQUIRE CRITICAL THINKING TO COMPLETE. (SLO 4)

ENGR 312 Engineering Graphics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 72 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Completion of MATH 110 or high school geometry with a grade of C or better; and MATH 120 with a grade of C or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Students will learn the graphical tools needed to develop and communicate engineering ideas. They will learn to represent objects in technical drawings (orthographic projection). Students will create drawings using computer aided drafting software (two-dimensional). They will solve civil engineering problems using grade, bearing, scales, topographical maps, and plan and profile views. Students will use three-dimensional solid modeling software to create models of mechanical objects from which they will make drawings. Students will learn the steps in engineering design, and will complete a design project which will culminate in detail and assembly drawings. This course is primarily for Mechanical and Civil Engineering majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1 - CREATE AND USE TECHNICAL DRAWINGS USING TWO DIMENSIONAL COMPUTER SOFTWARE
  • represent objects completely in fully dimensioned orthographic projections
  • construct isometric drawings
  • determine the true length, grade, and bearing of scaled features
  • construct plan and profile drawings for civil engineering applications
  • construct a set of working drawings
  • SLO#2 - CREATE AND USE THREE DIMENSIONAL SOLID MODELS
  • model individual parts
  • make assembly models from parts
  • create detail and assembly drawings from models
  • SLO#3 - CREATE SIMPLE ENGINEERING DESIGNS
  • describe and perform the steps involved in engineering design
  • create a solution to a simple design problem, culminating in working drawings

ENGR 400 Introduction to Electrical Circuits and Devices

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PHYS 421 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will provide engineering students with circuit analysis concepts and applications that will be of value in any engineering field as well as a solid foundation for electrical engineering and related majors. The course includes the analysis of circuits with resistors, inductors, capacitors, and independent and dependent voltage and current sources. Many analysis techniques will be applied to DC and AC circuits. Differential equations will be used to find the transient response of circuits. Power calculations will be performed on both DC and AC circuits, including an introduction to three-phase AC power. This course is required for most engineering Bachelors of Science degrees.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1 - ANALYZE ELECTRIC CIRCUITS FOR DC, TRANSIENT, AND AC VOLTAGE AND CURRENT RESPONSES
  • understand and apply various analysis techniques such as nodal analysis, loop analysis, superposition, source transformations, and Thevenin and Norton equivalents
  • evaluate different analysis techniques and choose an appropriate technique for a particular circuit
  • in circuits with step functions applied, solve for transient, forced, and complete response
  • use phasors and impedances to analyze AC circuits
  • SLO#2 - APPLY A SIMPLE MODEL FOR OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS TO SOLVE SIMPLE CIRCUITS
  • SLO#3 - USE MULTIMETERS, SIGNAL GENERATORS, AND OSCILLOSCOPES
  • SLO#4 - CALCULATE POWER IN DC AND AC CIRCUITS
  • perform conservation of power checks
  • apply the concepts of complex power to analyze AC circuits
  • analyze Y-Y connected balanced three phase circuits

ENGR 412 Properties of Materials

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:CHEM 400 and PHYS 411 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory course on the relationship of the internal structure of materials to their properties. Topics include crystalline structure, imperfections, phases and phase diagrams, steels and non-ferrous alloys, polymers, ceramics, semiconductors, and corrosion. Students will apply the concepts in laboratory activities and will use typical materials testing equipment and analysis techniques. This course is required for CRC's A.S.-Engineering, Civil/Mechanical Engineering option degree, and many university engineering B.S. degrees.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO1: RELATE THE PROPERTIES OF A MATERIAL TO ITS STRUCTURE ON A SUB-MICROSCOPIC SCALE.
  • Construct models of crystalline structures and explain how the structure's characteristics affect a material's properties.
  • Distinguish between the types of imperfections that occur in crystalline structures and compare their effects on a material's properties.
  • Describe different strengthening mechanisms and compare their effects.
  • Relate typical properties of polymers and ceramics to their molecular and crystalline or amorphous structures.
  • Describe the mechanism for electrical conduction in metals and semiconductors.
  • SLO2: INTERPRET BINARY PHASE DIAGRAMS.
  • Perform analysis involving different compositions, temperature, and phases.
  • Analyze eutectic and eutectoid reactions and the microconstituents that result.
  • SLO3: CHARACTERIZE MATERIAL PROPERTIES.
  • Perform tension, compression, and hardness tests, and interpret the results.
  • SLO4: DESCRIBE, SPECIFY, AND COMPARE DIFFERENT PROCESSES FOR FORMING OR TRANSFORMING MATERIALS.
  • Calculate rates of steady-state diffusion.
  • Specify processes involving cold work and annealing that provide specified properties.
  • Describe solidification processes and the microstructures that result when casting metals.
  • Compare different thermal processes for strengthening steel and aluminum alloys, the microstructures that result, and their effect on strength.
  • Mix, pour, and test concrete.
  • Describe different forming processes for ceramics.
  • SLO5: IDENTIFY AND DESCRIBE DIFFERENT FAILURE MECHANISMS AND APPROACHES TO PREVENTION.
  • Identify and describe ductile and brittle fracture, fatigue, and creep.
  • Differentiate between different corrosion mechanisms and choose appropriate ways to prevent corrosion.
  • SLO6: CONDUCT LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS AND EXHIBET PROFESSIONALISM
  • Produce and analyze data, discuss results, draw conclusions.
  • Write well organized reports that demonstrate good technical writing skills and professional appearance.
  • Demonstrate good practice and professional behavior (showing appropriate respect for people and equipment), including safety precautions, in lab work.
  • Behave ethically in collaboration with others and in the use of assistance obtained outside the context of class.

ENGR 420 Statics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 401 and PHYS 411 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGR 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers analysis of two and three dimensional force systems for bodies in static equilibrium. Vector and scalar analysis methods address forces acting on rigid bodies, trusses, frames, and machines. Students will calculate internal forces in members and will create shear and bending moment diagrams for beams. Friction problems will include slipping vs tipping. Students will learn methods to calculate centroids and moments of inertia for bodies that are combinations of simple geometric shapes. This course is required for most engineering majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1 - REDUCE SYSTEMS OF FORCES TO ONE EQUIVALENT FORCE, OR ONE FORCE AND ONE COUPLE.
  • transform information describing forces in a variety of formats into Cartesian vectors
  • calculate moments of forces and couples using scalar and vector approaches
  • SLO#2 - ANALYZE OBJECTS IN STATIC EQUILIBRIUM FOR EXTERNAL FORCES
  • characterize reactions at supports for two and three dimensional objects
  • draw free body diagrams for particles, rigid bodies, and members of frames and machines
  • formulate and solve equilibrium equations for forces on particles, rigid bodies, and members of frames and machines in two and three dimensions
  • SLO#3 - DETERMINE INTERNAL FORCES
  • apply Method of Joints and Method of Sections to find forces in truss members
  • determine axial, shear, and bending moment at specified points in rigid bodies
  • produce explicit functions for shear and bending moment in beams
  • construct shear and bending moment diagrams for beams
  • SLO#4 - ANALYZE SYSTEMS THAT INCLUDE DRY FRICTION
  • solve for forces in problems that include impending motion, no impending motion, and slipping vs. tipping
  • SLO#5 - DETERMINE GEOMETRICAL PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE BODIES
  • calculate centroids for two and three dimensional composite bodies
  • calculate moments of inertia for two and three dimensional composite bodies

ENGR 495 Independent Studies in Engineering

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

ENGR 498 Work Experience in Engineering

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position or job related to career goals in Engineering.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment in their major field of study or advancement within their career. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. Appropriate level learning objectives are established by the student and the employer. During the semester, the student is required to participate in a weekly orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. Work Experience may be taken for a total of 16 units when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR IN A FIELD OF STUDY RELATED ONE’S CAREER.(SLO 1)
  • Understand the effects time, stress, and organizational management have on performance.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of consistently practicing ethics and confidentiality in a workplace.
  • Examine the career/life planning process and relate its relevancy to the student.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of basic communication tools and their appropriate use.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of workplace etiquette.
  • DESCRIBE THE CAREER/LIFE PLANNING PROCESS AND RELATE ITS RELEVANCY TO ONE'S CAREER.(SLO 2)
  • Link personal goals to long term achievement.
  • Display an understanding of creating a professional first impression.
  • Understand how networking is a powerful job search tool.
  • Understand necessary elements of a résumé.
  • Understand the importance of interview preparation.
  • Identify how continual learning increases career success.
  • DEMONSTRATE APPLICATION OF INDUSTRY KNOWLEDGE AND THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AS WRITTEN IN LEARNING OBJECTIVES IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE EMPLOYER WORK SITE SUPERVISOR.(SLO 3)