Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education (ECE)

ECE 295 Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

ECE 300 Introduction to Principles and Practices in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to early childhood education, including an overview of the history of the field, evolution of professional practices and ethics, educational principles that support child development from birth through the school-age years, and teaching practices based on observation, documentation, and interpretation of children’s behavior.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Differentiate between philosophies of early childhood education in regards to assumptions about how young children learn and how early childhood teachers should teach.
  • Identify and compare effective policies, practices and environments in early care and education
  • List different program types, delivery systems, and licensing and regulation structures in early childhood settings.
  • Demonstrate awareness of developmental ages and stages and how they impact their teaching.
  • Define developmentally, culturally and linguistically appropriate practice.
  • Describe the characteristics of effective relationships and interactions between early childhood professionals, children, families, and colleagues and examine the importance of collaboration.
  • SLO #2: Relate current perspectives on childhood, the care of children, and early childhood education to historical and cultural contexts.
  • Compare and contrast theoretical and historical perspectives
  • Identify the historical roots of early childhood education.
  • SLO #3: Define and identify the role of observation, documentation, and interpretation of children’s play as a tool for planning curriculum for young children and assessing their learning.
  • Describe the relationship of observation, planning, implementation, and assessment in effective programming.
  • Validate the importance of documentation of children's work in progress as an important tool in the learning process for children, teachers, and parents.
  • Utilize observation and documentation to design play-based environments.
  • SLO #4: Identify career paths, certification options, professional associations, and dispositions for working in the early childhood profession.
  • Explain early care and education as a profession, including ethics and professional organizations.
  • Recognize the importance of advocacy and legislative issues impacting the early care and education field.
  • List different licensing and professional requirements as required by Title 22, Title 5 and the Child Development Permit.
  • SLO # 5: Describe principles and practices that guide teaching when working with young children, to include the development of play-based learning environments, routines that involve children in applying emerging skills, and strategies that support young children’s social competence.
  • Examine the value of play as a vehicle for developing skills, knowledge, dispositions and strengthening relationships amongst young children.
  • Identify ways of using play-based curriculum as a vehicle for developing skills, dispositions and knowledge.
  • Compare and contrast principles of positive guidance strategies.
  • Identify practices promoting positive guidance, communication and problem solving skills.
  • Describe adaptations needed to support children with diverse abilities.
  • Define the importance of establishing an anti-bias environment to support all children.

ECE 304 Family to Family: Introduction to Family Child Care

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an orientation to Family Child Care including local regulations, health and safety, curriculum, behavior management, and business requirements of in-home child care services.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the components of a successful and developmentally appropriate, licensed Family Child Care Facility.
  • develop criteria for implementing components of a quality family child care.
  • assess (through observation) that criteria are being met.

ECE 312 Child Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or 103; or ESLL 320, ESLR 320, and ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID CDEV 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the major physical, psychosocial, and cognitive/language developmental milestones for children, both typical and atypical, from conception to adolescence. There will be an emphasis on interactions between maturation processes and environmental factors. While studying developmental theory and investigative research methodologies, students will observe children, evaluate individual differences and analyze characteristics of development at various stages.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Analyze major developmental milestones for children from conception through adolescence in the areas of physical, psychosocial, cognitive and language development using research based methodologies.
  • Differentiate the developmental tasks in each of the ages and stages of development.
  • Distinguish the characteristics of typical and atypical behavior of children.
  • Examine major educational theories to each stage of development.
  • SLO #2: Analyze various factors that influence the growth and development of children.
  • Compare and contrast family, cultural and environmental influences and the roles they play in child development.
  • Evaluate the needs of children of all ages under varying conditions and how to provide for these needs.
  • Identify the responsibilities of parenthood.
  • SLO #3: Compare and contrast various theoretical frameworks that relate to the study of human development.
  • Examine ways in which developmental domains are continuous, sequential and interrelated.
  • Investigate and explain sources of developmental change and reasons for disturbances in the developmental process.
  • SLO #4: Apply developmental theory to the analysis of child observation, surveys, and/or interviews using investigative research methodologies.
  • Demonstrate objective techniques and skills when observing, interviewing, describing and evaluating behavior in children of all ages, cultures and backgrounds and her/his environment.
  • Examine and explain how bias influences the research process.
  • SLO #5: Differentiate characteristics of typical and atypical development at various stages.
  • Identify and describe risk factors that impact families and child at each major developmental stage
  • Examine and evaluate the importance of the early years and the effects of interaction between the individual and her/his environment.
  • Review the importance of inclusive programs to support children with atypical development.
  • Investigate and explain the process of bilingual development in children at various stages.
  • Evaluate the role of the family in facilitating children's development.
  • Validate the role of play and its relationship to development at various stages.
  • SLO #6: Analyze the importance of the early years and the interaction between maturational processes and social/environmental factors and the effects on various areas of development.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of current research findings as they apply to child development.
  • Examine and evaluate the importance of the early years and the effects of interaction between the individual and her/his environment.

ECE 314 The Child, the Family and the Community

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or 103; or ESLL 320, ESLR 320, ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D7; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID CDEV 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a historical and current examination of the developing child in a societal context focusing on the interrelationship of family, school and community. The process of socialization and identity development will be highlighted, showing the importance of respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1 Analyze theories of socialization that address the interrelationship of child, family and community.
  • Demonstrate the principles of child development within the context of a system influenced by numerous factors of socialization.
  • Discuss theories about the role of the family, school and community in the process of socialization.
  • Compare and contrast diverse family structures, parenting styles, culture, traditions and values and their impact upon children and youth.
  • SLO# 2 Evaluate how educational, political and socioeconomic factors directly impact the lives of children and families.
  • Examine the impact of change and transitions upon children and family dynamics.
  • Investigate the political system and child advocacy and its effects on children and families.
  • Examine the role of child care and schooling in the socialization of children.
  • SLO# 3 Synthesize and analyze research regarding social issues, changes and transitions that affect families, schools and communities.
  • Describe the patterns and configurations of socialization factors that are needed to explain the variance in developmental paths and outcomes of children.
  • Apply socialization theory in early care and education environments.
  • SLO# 4 Critique strategies that support families through respectful, reciprocal relationships to involve families in their children's development and learning.
  • Define and examine a variety of contemporary issues that influence family functioning and develop appropriate strategies to support families dealing with stress.
  • Interpret the impact of socioeconomic factors on children and families, including but not limited to the following areas; work, childcare and education, single parenting, health, poverty and children with special needs.
  • Investigate and explain the effects of age, gender, diverse abilities, language and culture, racial identity and ethnicity, socio-economic status, institutions, the media, and public policy on children and families.
  • SLO# 5 Assess community support services and agencies that are available to community and families.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify and analyze risk factor/or problems and support families in finding appropriate community resources.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of legal requirements and ethical responsibilities of professionals working with all children and families.
  • Investigate advocacy strategies to influence public policy on behalf of children and families.
  • Identify stereotypes and assumptions that affect attitudes and actions within the family, the culture and the professional community.
  • SLO# 6 Analyze one's own values, goals and sense of identity as it relates to family history and life experiences, assess how this impacts relationships with children and families.
  • Explore one's own family history and examine how it affects our relationships with children and families.
  • Investigate personals biases that can affect their work with children and families.

ECE 320 Curriculum and Interactions in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:4
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 and 312 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:ECE 326
  • Enrollment Limitation:Under California law (Title 22) any persons working directly with children must provide proof of current Tuberculosis clearance and provide any required proof of immunizations (currently: measles, pertussis, and influenza/influenza waiver).
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides supervised experience working with children in an early childhood setting. Topics include principles of curriculum development, classroom design, and child guidance, with the opportunity to apply these key teaching principles in practical situations. This course is approved as the required programs and curriculum core course specified in Title 22 of the Health and Safety
Code of the Department of Social Services, Community Care Licensing Division and Title 5 Department of Education regulations. Before beginning lab assignments, students must show proof of TB clearance and documentation of all required vaccinations.
(C-ID ECE 130)

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Apply developmentally appropriate principles and practices to support young children’s optimal development and learning within healthy, safe, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments.
  • Explain verbally and in writing the sequence of play as central to development and learning for young children.
  • Define, explain and apply constructivist theory in curriculum planning for young children
  • Identify key ways in which the environment functions as an essential component of curriculum and as the "third teacher" in an early childhood classroom.
  • SLO #2: Evaluate one’s own teaching experiences to guide and inform practice.
  • Identify the key roles of the teacher in the cycle of observation, documentation, child guidance, designing play-based learning environments and activities
  • Evaluate teacher behaviors for best practices reflecting current research and the impact it has on children's learning and development.
  • SLO #3: Design, develop, and evaluate play-based learning environments for young children, routines that involve young children in applying emerging ideas and skills, and developmentally-appropriate and inclusive learning activities for young children.
  • Organize environments rich in possibilities and provocations that invite the children to undertake extended exploration and problem solving.
  • Design environments which support and enrich children's learning through in-depth, short-term and long-term project work.
  • SLO #4: Plan, implement, and evaluate experiences that support young children in building a foundation for language and literacy, math and science, social sciences, and the arts.
  • Apply understanding of children's learning and development to design and evaluate age appropriate foundational curriculum in areas such as: language and literacy, physical/motor mastery, creativity and the arts, mathematics, and science.
  • Develop curriculum and environments that support children who are English language learners
  • Demonstrate in curriculum plans the progression from "simple to complex" and "concrete to abstract" and explain how these concepts are essential for all children's learning.
  • SLO #5: Demonstrate communication and guidance strategies that support the development of young children’s social competence.
  • Recognize individual differences and diversity in child development and the implications for child behaviors and guidance.
  • Validate how the social environment affects the development of children, and reflect about ways to strengthen children and families.
  • Infer and redirect children's intentions and provide positive ways to express their feelings and ideas.
  • Understand respectful and reciprocal relationships with families, including how to support families whose home language is other than English and/or whose children have special needs.

ECE 321 Advanced Practicum in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:4
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300, 312, 320, and 326 with grades of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Under California law (Title 22) any persons working directly with children must provide proof of current Tuberculosis clearance and provide any required proof of immunizations (currently: measles, pertussis, and influenza/influenza waiver).
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 210
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The advanced practicum course provides supervised experience for students as teachers in an early childhood education program and is aimed at building leadership in the areas of developing environments for learning, child observation and assessment, documentation of children's work, guiding behavior, group management, collaborative teaching, supporting relationships with families, and effective preparation and implementation of curriculum. In an early childhood setting and under the guidance of a mentor teacher, students will build on introductory experiences offered in Introduction to Curriculum. Students will be assigned to the campus child development centers or centers with approved mentor teachers for the supervised laboratory experience. Lecture and laboratory components provide opportunities to plan, provision, and supervise the overall learning setting. Course work is aimed at mastering classroom leadership in the areas of child observation, documentation of children's work, child assessment, guidance of behavior, group management, collaborative teaching and effective oversight of long-term study projects. Before beginning lab assignments, students must show proof of TB clearance and documentation of all required vaccinations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO# 1: Appraise philosophies, principles, and practices of early childhood education that are formulated from research-based theories of how young children learn within a social and cultural context.
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and stimulating learning environments for all children; apply understanding of the multiple influences on developmental learning.
  • Apply the NAEYC code of ethical conduct into practices.
  • SLO# 2: Design, arrange, observe, and evaluate classroom environments wherein children construct knowledge within a context of play.
  • Analyze classroom space in terms of its effect on the behavior and interactions of children and teachers.
  • Design aesthetic environments that respect the child and their learning.
  • Integrate the vision of a child as a competent learner in the designing the classroom environment and interactions.
  • SLO# 3: Evaluate communication systems within a classroom to involve families in the process of curriculum and program design.
  • Assess personal experiences to inform and guide future teaching and collaborative practices.
  • Apply principles of observation and documentation to communicate regularly with colleagues and children's families in order to plan curriculum that meets developmental needs, builds on current knowledge and research about culturally-respectful and inclusive environments.
  • Analyze and utilize the documentation of children's work in progress as an important tool in the learning process for children, teachers, and parents.
  • SLO# 4: Plan, implement, observe, and evaluate the overall and ongoing curriculum and learning encounters, verifying opportunities to apply emerging skills in the areas of language and literacy; math and science; the arts; physical development; and social sciences.
  • Plan, present and evaluate a variety of developmentally, culturally and linguistically appropriate, play-based curricula and environments that integrate children's developing learning competencies and skills.
  • Present concepts and hypotheses in multiple forms such as print, art, construction, drama, music, puppetry, and shadow play.
  • Respond to the emerging interests and developmental inclinations of children.
  • SLO# 5: Demonstrate the use of observation, documentation, and interpretation for curriculum planning, assessment of children’s learning, and advocacy in regards to making visible children’s learning.
  • Integrate and display documentations of the children's work.
  • Design activities offered over time that give children opportunities to construct cognitive connections and thereby build knowledge.
  • Evaluate the importance of risk-taking to cognitive, physical and social development.
  • Reflect on teaching experiences in order to guide and inform practice.

ECE 322 Promoting Children's Social Competence

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on early childhood guidance and discipline through examination of theories, research and practical application for teachers in early childhood classrooms and families. The course includes strategies for understanding and responding to children's behavior in ways that are congruent with the core values of early childhood education. Concepts of guidance relating to typical and atypical development, culture, and environment will be presented. Developmental stages of children's behavior, positive guidance strategies and teaching social-emotional skills are included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: Integrate research based knowledge of child development theories and practices to support social-emotional development of young children.
  • Research factors in at-risk environments that affect the healthy social development of young children
  • Identify elements of children’s and adult’s development, culture, dispositions or experiences Evaluate issues that influence social and emotional interactions and behavior.
  • SLO 2: Analyze children’s social-emotional development as the foundation for all later learning.
  • Review practices that emphasize positive emotional growth and support the early identification of emotional and behavioral difficulties.
  • Explore practices that identify the underlying need behind each individual behavior
  • Analyze the connection between responsive relationships with adults and children as the basis for healthy emotional development and learning.
  • Incorporate reflective practices as the organizational and responsive model to support the healthy social-emotional development of children.
  • SLO 3: Acquire knowledge of the importance of verbal and non-verbal communication and the impact on social-emotional development
  • Describe the channels of verbal and non-verbal communication
  • Investigate the different ways in which children use both verbal and non-verbal communication
  • Evaluate the ways in which non-verbal and verbal behaviors communicate messages about relationships between adults and children.
  • SLO 4: Recognize and model the ethical principles and educational values that are the foundation for early childhood education.
  • Assess the difference between simple decision- making and ethical judgments
  • Compare and contrast how program goals, strategies and standards relate to ethical judgment
  • Outline the skills, knowledge and dispositions related to the ethical code of conduct, day-to-day decision making and children’s behavior
  • Choose and practice elements of personal development that support early childhood educational professionals' ability to implement and model respectful relationships with co-workers, families, and children
  • SLO 5: Analyze the role of the teacher in the healthy emotional development of young children.
  • Investigate a constructivist approach to foster moral classrooms that support the moral development of young children.
  • Implementing strategies that foster social-moral atmosphere in the classroom that promote intellectual, moral, emotional and personality development
  • Propose how to use time, space, ritual and routines, and the physical play-based environment that foster positive social interactions and preserves the identity of children
  • Identify teaching and parenting practices that foster social-emotional skills and positive self-esteem
  • SLO 6: Develop a plan to support children when they face stressful situations
  • Construct an understanding of educational practices that support children's and adult’s socio-emotional development, emotional regulation, social knowledge, moral development and social understanding.
  • Apply knowledge of brain research theory when designing practices that support children social-emotional development
  • Incorporate strategies for helping children cope more effectively when they are under stress
  • Propose communication strategies with families who are facing stressful situations.
  • Develop clear rationale for choosing guidance strategies based on best practices that support individual children
  • SLO 7: Confirm the importance and nature of play in the social-emotional development of young children
  • Analyze the relationship of play to other aspects of development
  • Review the developmental trends in various types of play
  • Evaluate how play contributes to each of the elements of social-emotional and moral development
  • Appraise the role of the adult in facilitating play- based environments that promote moral development.

ECE 326 Making Learning Visible Through Observation and Documentation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 312 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course applies critical and reflective thinking to observation and assessment of young children’s development. It also prepares teachers of young children to use observation, documentation, and interpretation strategies to improve program quality in early childhood settings. Multiple forms of child assessment and early childhood program assessment are explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Appraise the purpose, value, and use of formal and informal assessments, including ethical and legal concerns.
  • Generate and analyze portfolios of observations of young children's growth and development, and use the information with children and families.
  • Analyze documentation to design and assemble environments that support children's learning.
  • Demonstrate and preserve children's ideas, thoughts, feelings, and reports to stimulate their memories of significant experiences, thereby further enhancing their learning related to the topics investigated.
  • Incorporate knowledge of the legal and ethical responsibilities, including confidentiality related to assessment in early childhood education.
  • Evaluate and identify logistical challenges, biases and preconceptions about assessing children.
  • SLO #2: Assess the strengths and limitations of common assessment tools with respect to children’s diverse cultures, home languages, and developmental capabilities.
  • Utilize observation and documentation to assess children's interest, strengths and skills. Consider the effect of social context, child's state of health and well-being, primary language, ability and environment on assessment tools.
  • Implement planning and evaluation that can be done by the team of adults who work with the children.
  • Examine children's collaborative work on a daily basis and discuss with them their ideas and the possibilities of new options for the following days.
  • Analyze and implement decisions made on the basis of what individual or groups of children have found interesting, stimulating, puzzling, or challenging.
  • Develop the ability to support and optimize the children's thinking by providing them with tools and materials that encourages them to express their ideas.
  • Implement, plan and evaluate what can be done by the team of adults who work with the children.
  • SLO #3: Recommend changes to play environments, guidance strategies, curriculum activities, and care routines based on systematically recorded observational data that documents children's actions, ideas, and feelings.
  • Utilize documentation and assessment tools (DRDP) to inform parents and policy makers of "best practices" in early childhood education.
  • Design opportunities to support parents to reexamine their assumptions about their parenting roles and their views about the experience their children are living, and take a new and more inquisitive approach toward the whole school experience.
  • Discover different opportunities for parental involvement: listening to children's intentions, helping them find the materials they need, making suggestions, helping children write their ideas, offering assistance in finding and reading books, and measuring or counting things in the context of the project.
  • Research and apply observation tools (e.g., ECERs-R and ELLCO) and documentation to support play-based learning environments.
  • Generate provocations in the environment to support children's inquiry strategies.
  • SLO #4: Implement assessment within play-based environments, curriculum, and care routines designed to support all children, regardless of developmental capabilities.
  • Demonstrate how children learn when involved with materials that are concrete and relevant to them.
  • SLO #5: Integrate observed documentation of children’s ideas, feelings, and actions to engage children’s families and others as active partners in developing early childhood curriculum and programs.
  • Appraise teacher's role in the development of plans generated by children's ideas.
  • Evaluate the documented steps taken by children during their investigations and representational work.
  • Uncover the uniqueness of each child's construction of his or her experience, and the ways group efforts contribute to their learning.
  • Analyze and adjust teaching strategies, and ideas for new strategies, while deepening teachers' awareness of each child's progress.
  • Formulate informed decisions about appropriate ways to support each child's development and learning.
  • SLO #6: Develop photo documents that help others see and value how young children learn within quality early childhood settings.
  • Categorize and design documentation displays highlighting the children's work and learning process.
  • Integrate the Reggio Emilia's philosophy, theory and practices when documenting children's learning.
  • Arrange careful and attractive documentary displays, which convey to children that their efforts, intentions, and ideas are taken seriously.
  • Analyze first-hand observations of children's work in a wide variety of media to provide evidence of their learning.

ECE 330 Infant and Toddler Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers infant development from conception through three years of age. Students will apply current research to the preparation for conception, birth, and raising children in the first three years of life. Students will learn strategies for caring for infants at each developmental stage. This course is for parents or professionals working with infants in health fields, education, or social services.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Analyze early growth and development from conception to thirty-six months.
  • Assess current research regarding all developmental domains: physical, cognitive, social/emotional, and language.
  • Differentiate the developmental tasks in each of the developmental domains.
  • Examine the research regarding positive attention, approval, and attunement as the foundation of secure attachment.
  • SLO #2: Differentiate the characteristics of typical and atypical development.
  • Identify and describe the risk factors that can potentially impact families and affect infant growth.
  • Examine access to early intervention and the types of observation tools that can assess potential developmental delays.
  • SLO #3: Assess respectful care-giving strategies that respond to cultural diversity and support justice, equality and inclusion.
  • Formulate guidance strategies to support the healthy self-identity of infants.
  • Distinguish variations in temperament and their significance to parents and caregivers.

ECE 331 Care and Education of Infants and Toddlers

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 312 or 330 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course applies current research in infant development to the teaching and care of infants in group settings. Early childhood education principles and practices are emphasized in the application of care and education of infants from birth to three years of age. Students will learn strategies for designing, implementing, and evaluating group care programs for infants and toddlers.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Demonstrate an understanding of essential policies and practices of quality infant and toddler programs.
  • Support context for learning including environments, care, experiences, conversations, and interactions.
  • SLO #2: Analyze strategies to promote healthy and respectful relationships in the care and education of infants and toddlers.
  • Caregiving routines and guidance strategies.
  • SLO #3: Evaluate infant and toddler curriculum and environments based on observation, documentation, and reflection.
  • Understand how curriculum is used for planning, family engagement, and advocacy for children with atypical development.

ECE 342 Constructive Math and Science in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course is an introduction to the constructivist approach to teaching pre-math and science in early childhood education. The content and teaching techniques support the perspective that children construct knowledge through a dynamic, interactive process that facilitates their development of working theories relating to math and science.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1: Examine how young children learn mathematics and science concepts based on the knowledge of relevant research and child development.
  • describe the constructivist and inquiry-based approaches to teaching in early childhood education.
  • analyze key math and science concepts children are building in early childhood
  • critique the important concepts in children's construction of knowledge in math and science while comparing inquiry based learning to product-driven repetition and drill practice.
  • SLO#2: Evaluate curriculum in math and science for young children using an constructivist/inquiry-based approach.
  • integrate knowledge of the constructivist/inquiry-based approach to design curriculum that is culturally respectful and inclusive as well as considerate of children's prior experiences gaining knowledge about the world.
  • design and implement curriculum in math and science using the constructivist/inquiry-based approach.
  • SLO#3: Assess effective approaches to teaching and math and science in early childhood education.
  • demonstrate teaching techniques that encourage and support children in actively developing understandings of the processes involved in mathematical and scientific knowledge.
  • compare effective, appropriate, and intentional teaching techniques for supporting, scaffolding, documenting, and assessing young children's mathematical and scientific learning.
  • SLO#4: Analyze important elements of the learning environment for young children to learn math and science concepts.
  • design math-rich and science-rich learning explorations to provide meaningful opportunities for children to apply and master inquiry-based skills and concepts.

ECE 343 Language and Literacy Development in Early Childhood

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will prepare current or future early childhood educators and caregivers to understand and enhance the emergent literacy experiences of young children. The knowledge of developmentally appropriate literacy practices will improve the early childhood educators' abilities to prepare children from birth to age 5 for reading and writing in the primary grades.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO # 1: Describe developmental patterns in early literacy learning and research-based teaching practices that help children build a foundation for rich vocabularies and language fluency for reading and writing.
  • Compare and contrast literacy, emergent literacy and early literacy.
  • Evaluate ways of assessing children’s language development and literacy learning.
  • Review current research pertaining to the acquisition of language and pre-literacy skills in young children.
  • Describe ways of involving families in their young children's emerging literacy skills.
  • SLO # 2: Analyze the developmental continuum of reading and writing and use it in determining developmentally appropriate practices for literacy in early childhood.
  • Design and define developmentally appropriate goals and expectations for young children’s achievement in reading and in writing.
  • Incorporate developmentally appropriate teaching practices that support children’s language and literacy knowledge from birth through age five.
  • Examine and assess the teacher’s role in promoting language and literacy development in young children.
  • Evaluate and demonstrate strategies of collaboration with children’s families to implement projects that support children’s literacy experiences both at school and at home.
  • Distinguish quality print-rich environments in which children can work and play.
  • Apply principles of development in designing and implementing activities and curricula that promote language and literacy development.
  • Compare and contrast opportunities for children to use language and literacy for authentic purposes in school, home and the community.
  • SLO # 3: Analyze strategies for adapting emergent literacy practices for individual and cultural differences, including second language learners.
  • Assess and propose literature and other learning materials for diverse learners, as well as cultural and linguistic variations among children.
  • Articulate the components of developmentally appropriate literacy events inclusive of children with special needs and diverse backgrounds.
  • Design adaptations to the environment and experiences to support diverse learners.
  • SLO# 4: Use authentic forms of assessment to identify progress in language and literacy skill.
  • Examine different assessment methodologies to evaluate the development of pre-literacy and language skills.
  • Critically reflect on best practices and current research in promoting language and literacy development in children.
  • Evaluate and define program policies (program funding, staffing ratios, curricular resources and assessment) that support early childhood language and literacy teaching and learning.

ECE 350 Introduction to Elementary Teaching with Field Experience

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Under California laws (Title 22 and Title 5) any persons working directly with children have to give proof of current Tuberculosis clearance.
  • Advisory:ECE 312
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID EDUC 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the concepts and issues related to teaching diverse learners in today's contemporary schools, Kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12). Course content includes teaching as a profession and career, historical and philosophical foundations of the American education system, contemporary educational issues, California's content standards and frameworks, and teacher performance standards, as well as observation skills, communication skills, diversity and social issues. In addition to class time, the course requires a minimum of 45 scheduled hours of structured fieldwork in public elementary school classrooms that represent California's diverse student population, and includes cooperation with campus-approved certificated classroom teachers. Students' fieldwork experiences will integrate and apply the course content. Before beginning field placement, students must show proof of TB clearance.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1: Examine the process of becoming an elementary school teacher.
  • define the role and function of the teacher in the public school setting.
  • identify academic requirements and experiences needed to obtain a teaching credential.
  • evaluate the attitudes, actions and behaviors of the effective professional educator.
  • SLO#2: Compare and contrast the various educational philosophies and theoretical frameworks related to human learning.
  • apply theories related to child development and learning in a field placement setting.
  • investigate a personal view of teaching as a career in terms of educational philosophy and pedagogy.
  • SLO#3: Examine and assess issues concerning student diversity, societal change and the challenges they present.
  • apply principles that underlie effective relationships with other teachers, students, and families.
  • examine communication strategies for inclusive teaching practices and classroom management skills.
  • SLO#4: Formulate objective, descriptive and interpretive observation skills.
  • demonstrate basic observation methods to assess learning.
  • assess one's own teaching experience through observation and reflection.
  • SLO#5: Apply knowledge of observation and learning theory through planning, teaching and interaction with elementary school students.
  • design and implement basic lesson plans in content areas.
  • prepare a service learning project.

ECE 356 Programs for the School-Age Child

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ECE 312 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This program will present the fundamentals of planning, implementing and evaluating programs for before- and after-school care of school-age children (K-6). Course emphasis is on developmental levels, age-appropriate activities and day-to-day program operation. A field trip may be utilized to enhance classroom instruction.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Appraise the quality of school-age programs
  • define the elements of a quality school-age program
  • choose and use reliable assessment tools to assess and evaluate a variety of environments for school-age child care
  • evaluate the implications of state regulations for program functioning
  • analyze budgets and staffing patterns for use in before and after school child care
  • SLO #2: Design activities for school-age programs
  • plan, implement and evaluate age-appropriate activities for school-age programs
  • develop schedules, routines, and activities for school-age child care, and employ non-bias attitudes to meet the needs of different ages, gender, and abilities
  • SLO #3: Characterize school-age children as active learners
  • apply an understanding of the characteristics of school-age children to conducting programs and activities
  • analyze active learning techniques appropriate for school-age children
  • identify the differences in programs for children of preschool-age from those of school-age

ECE 365 Creative Projects and Experiences for Young Children

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course prepares teachers in early childhood education with strategies for promoting children's creativity through experiential projects and experiences. The focus will be on observing children's natural ways of exploring their environment and on the learning strategies needed to facilitate and document children's learning and emerging skills. Students will evaluate and design creative early childhood environments which promote a project approach and a Reggio Emilia perspective.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO # 1 Define and apply the Reggio Emilia approach to education.
  • Create the conditions for learning that are necessary to enhance and facilitate children's construction of "his or her own powers of thinking through the synthesis of all the expressive, communicative and cognitive languages
  • Evaluate early childhood classroom environments for their capacity to promote young children's comfort and competence in using expressive media to represent impressions, feelings, and experiences.
  • Define creativity and identify educational practices and procedures which encourage creativity in children
  • Plan, demonstrate, and evaluate creative learning environment and experiences appropriate to children with diverse cultural, physical, social, emotional and cognitive needs.
  • SLO # 2 Utilize documentation as an important tool in the Reggio Emilia approach
  • Collect anecdotal observations of children's encounters with projects and make visible children's learning through developmental portfolios and displays.
  • Design documentation that supports reflective examination among teachers, families, and children of the aesthetic and cognitive dimensions creativity in children's work.
  • SLO # 3 Validate representational work as a way of promoting children's growth and development.
  • Understand Howard Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligence
  • Integrate the graphic arts as tools for cognitive, linguistic, and social development.
  • Promote presentation of concepts and hypotheses in multiple forms of representation -- print, art, construction, drama, music, puppetry, and shadow play -- as they are viewed as essential to children's understanding of an experience
  • SLO # 4 Research the Project Approach, as, in-depth studies of concepts, ideas, and interests which arise within the group and which enhance children's learning.
  • Record and analyze children's conversations and and emergent interest an support further exploration of the topics
  • Understand that team planning is an essential component of the emergent curriculum.
  • Value Collaborative group work, both large and small, as a way to advance cognitive development.
  • Formulate Hypothesis about the possible directions of a project, the materials needed, and possible parent and/or community support and involvement.
  • SLO # 5 Create aesthetic environments to promote learning
  • Design spaces to incorporate the documentation of children's work, plants, collections and on-going projects.
  • Organize space for small and large group projects and small intimate spaces for one, two or three children.
  • Organize the classroom and materials to be aesthetically pleasing
  • SLO # 6 Explore the role of the teacher as researcher and learner.
  • Co-explore the learning experience with the children
  • Define the teacher's role as they help children make decisions about the direction of study, the ways in which the group will research the topic, the representational medium that will demonstrate and showcase the topic and the selection of materials needed to represent the work.
  • Provoke ideas, problem solving, and conflict management
  • Support children to see the connections in learning and experiences
  • Support children express their knowledge through representational work
  • Foster the connection between home, school and community
  • Organize materials to help children make thoughtful decisions about the media Support children to see the connections in learning and experiences

ECE 402 Infants with Atypical Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 312 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will examine the developmental characteristics, assessment techniques, methods of intervention, natural environments, community and family resources, and current issues of the atypical infant from birth through age three. Students will understand and practice the early intervention techniques the very young children with special needs and disabilities require in the developmental areas of sensory stimulation and integration, gross and fine motor control, cognitive, language, social and self-help skills. The course will explore the community services and agencies that offer family support as well as the laws related to the atypical infant/toddler. Career and vocational opportunities in the fields related to special needs infant/toddlers and the various roles of the multi-disciplinary teams that develop the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) will be examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Access and apply current research knowledge related to how infants develop.
  • Identify conditions which cause birth defects and other developmental disabilities.
  • Compare and contrast the unique strengths and needs of infants/toddlers with both atypical and typical development in all of the developmental domains: physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and communication skills.
  • SLO #2: Evaluate the various techniques and instruments used to assess the physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and communication abilities of infant/toddlers with atypical development.
  • Assess and practice the multi-disciplinary team process utilized in the development of an IFSP (Individualized Family Service Plan), (birth - 3 years).
  • SLO #3: Articulate the legislation and due process rights that applies to children from birth to three years old with special needs and to their families.
  • Differentiate and recommend effective public and private program options and community resources available to support infant/toddlers with special needs and their families.
  • Formulate an understanding, respect and sensitivity of the diversity in human characteristics that a child with special needs brings to different families.
  • Support the development of families' self-advocacy and empowerment
  • SLO#4: Analyze learning environments that allow infants with atypical development to discover and create through active exploration.
  • Plan and implement activities that are supportive of natural environments, behavior management techniques and instructional strategies to meet the goals and objectives of the IFSP in an inclusive early childhood setting.
  • SLO #5: Identify career and vocational opportunities in early intervention programs.
  • Review the education and competency skills required of those who work with infants and toddlers with atypical development.

ECE 404 Children with Special Needs

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 312 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the characteristics, assessment techniques, methods of intervention, natural environments , community and family resources, and current issues of children from birth to adolescence with diverse abilities and disabilities. The focus is to increase the awareness and understanding of individual needs and strengths in an early childhood and after-school setting. Focus on full inclusion as a support to development will be emphasized. Observations in public and private children's centers, schools and agencies are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1: Appraise the self-identity of children with diverse abilities.
  • Identify and develop respect for and sensitivity to the diversity in human characteristics and impact of a child with special needs on different families
  • Generate ideas to create a full inclusion play based environment where the self-identity and learning of children is supported.
  • Explore strategies to increase the interaction between children with diverse abilities and children who are typically developing.
  • SLO# 2: Appraise the development of children who are differently-able on all the domains; physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and communication development.
  • List and categorize areas of special needs such as speech, hearing, reflexes, reactions, cognition, socio-emotional abilities and physical handicapping conditions.
  • Compare and contrast the developmental milestones of children with atypical and typical development.
  • Apply the accommodations, adaptations, and modifications made to assist the development of children with diverse abilities.
  • Research, discuss, and debate the practice of inclusion.
  • SLO# 3: Evaluate the various techniques and instruments used to assess the physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and communication abilities of young children with special needs
  • Evaluate an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) and an Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) and the legal and operational requirements.
  • Apply techniques of observation and documentation to assess developmental progress.
  • Analyze the multi-disciplinary team process utilized in the development of an Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP), birth - 3 years and Individualized Education Plan (IEP), 3 - 21 years.
  • SLO# 4: Evaluate the impact of a child with diverse abilities has on the family.
  • Describe the grief process families frequently experience with the birth of a child with special needs.
  • Identify community resources available to support families and caregivers of children who are differently-abled.
  • Develop support strategies for siblings of children with diverse abilities.
  • SLO# 5: Evaluate the importance of designing inclusive play based learning environments.
  • Apply techniques of observation and documentation to assist with the planning for children's activities
  • Analyze the role of the teacher in full inclusion environments.
  • Investigate adaptive strategies, curriculum, tools and equipment.
  • Explain the code of ethics and rules for confidentiality when working with children with special needs and their families.
  • Explain the importance of working collaboratively as part of a multi-disciplinary team.
  • SLO# 6: Synthesize and discuss the history and current trends within the professional literature relevant to the identification and treatment of "special needs" in children with implications in educational practices.
  • Describe and discuss various definitions of "special needs" in children relative to educational laws, policies, and programs.
  • Describe and discuss the practical implications of various factors that place children "at risk" for dysfunction as well as those factors connected with "resilience."
  • Describe and discuss some of the legal, moral, ethical and value-based dimensions of various assessment and intervention strategies involving labeling and treating "special needs" in children.
  • Describe and discuss various points of view about defining children's special needs within the context of traumatized, vulnerable and oppressed populations, including children with limited legal recourse; persons of various disabilities and health conditions; racial, cultural, socio-economic, language dominance, and sexual preference differences.

ECE 415 Children's Health, Safety and Nutrition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 220
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The key components that ensure the health, safety, and nutrition of both children and staff will be identified along with the importance of collaboration with families and health professionals. Students will be introduced to early childhood curriculum, regulations, standards, policies and procedures related to child health, safety and nutrition. Course emphasis is placed on integrating and maintaining the optimal health, safety, and nutritional concepts in everyday planning and program development for all children, including injury prevention, accident reporting, infectious diseases control, sanitation and emergency procedures and evacuation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO# 1: Assess strategies to maximize the mental and physical health of children and adults in programs for all young children in accordance with culturally, linguistically and developmentally sound practices.
  • Demonstrate effective strategies for evaluating health and safety policies and procedures.
  • Compare and contrast various health assessment tools and policies
  • Assess strategies to maximize the mental, physical and emotional health in programs for all children in accordance with culturally, linguistically and developmentally sound practice.
  • Design and develop developmentally appropriate, culturally and linguistically sound health and safety curriculum to be introduced to children and their families.
  • SLO# 2: Identify health, safety and environmental risks in children's programs.
  • Differentiate symptoms of common communicable diseases and other health conditions that affect children.
  • Apply sanitation universal practices in order to prevent the spread of communicable diseases.
  • Assess strategies to maximize the mental, physical and emotional health in programs for all children in accordance with culturally, linguistically and developmentally sound practice.
  • SLO #3: Analyze the nutritional needs of children at various ages and evaluate the relationship between healthy development and nutrition.
  • Differentiate the nutritional needs of various ages of children and plan economical and nutritional meals and snacks which meet current state and federal guidelines.
  • Examine nutrition and health practices and different perspectives in culturally-diverse environments.
  • Evaluate current health hazards in the food supply and explain the control of foodborne illness.
  • SLO# 4: Recommend regulations, standards policies and procedures related to health, safety and nutrition in support of young children, families and teachers in the program.
  • Investigate laws, regulations, standards, policies and procedures supporting health, safety and nutrition in children's programs and families. (e.g. Title 22, Title 5, Fire Code)
  • Create emergency response procedures utilizing the provisions required by federal and state laws.
  • Demonstrate skill in maintaining standards of health and safety which protect the child from injury.
  • Describe the inter-relationships of health, safety and nutrition as conditions affecting children’s health
  • SLO # 5: Infer aspects of quality in programs for young children as related to health, safety and nutrition.
  • Research current issues related to children and their families.
  • Evaluate the teacher's role and responsibilities to model, health safety and nutrition appropriate for children and families.
  • Formulate various methods of collaboration with teachers and families to promote health, safety and nutrition in settings for children.
  • Identify characteristics of abuse and neglect and demonstrate knowledge of mandated child abuse reporting procedures.

ECE 420 Administration I: Programs in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 and 312 with grades of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ECE 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory course in the elements of program planning, budgeting, supervision and personnel administration for public and private centers and schools serving young children.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Recognize, identify, and appraise the components and measures of quality early care and education programs.
  • reference and assess the legal requirements of child care centers according to the California Regulations for Title 22 and Title 5 Programs.
  • examine and plan schedules, routines, and enrollment procedures to meet the needs of children and families.
  • Review federal and state quality improvement mandates.
  • SLO #2: Distinguish basic operational principles of administration in developing and planning a center facility.
  • apply basic operational principles of administration in program planning, budgeting, equipping and staffing to meet the nutritional, health, and safety standards for children and families.
  • identify required components of record keeping for enrollment and personnel documentation.
  • describe the legal requirements and responsibilities of administering an early care and education program.
  • summarize essential practices for collaboration with staff, families, and community.
  • SLO #3 demonstrate effective practices for managing and leading staff and administering early care and education programs.
  • implement ongoing professional development plans based on evaluation of staff and administrator needs.
  • formulate strategies for compensation and professional growth opportunities in programs.
  • SLO #4 Evaluate strategies to create a diverse and inclusive environment.
  • articulate the importance of professional integrity and confidentiality.
  • Implement the NAEYC code of ethical conduct to create culturally responsive early care and education environments.

ECE 422 Administration II: Personnel and Leadership in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 and 312 with grades of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ECE 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an advanced course in administration and coordination of multi-faceted Child Development Programs. The emphasis of the course will be on publicly funded programs and personnel management. This course meets the requirements of the Education Code under Title 5, and the Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Recognize, identify, and appraise the components and measures of quality child care programs.
  • examine and apply the legal regulations and requirements of publicly funded child care programs under Title 5 of the Education Code.
  • analyze and synthesize management issues in relation to budgets, working with boards and supervising agencies, grant proposal writing and developing business plans.
  • SLO #2: Develop and demonstrate communication and collaboration skills with colleagues, children, families, and communities of diverse backgrounds.
  • describe and analyze current leadership issues in child development program administration.
  • SLO #3: Create policies and practices that recognize the importance of the family in the education of young children.
  • appraise and evaluate the role of administrator and the interaction with staff, families, volunteers and community.
  • identify potential issues and establish procedures involving the interrelationships of families, staff, agencies, and administration.

ECE 424 Adult Supervision: Mentoring in a Collaborative Learning Setting

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the methods and principles of collaborative learning, with emphasis on supervising adults working in early care and education centers. Special attention is placed on the role of a mentor as a reflective practitioner who is open to professional development and who has a keen understanding of classroom practice that is effective and supports individual strengths for children, families and colleagues. This course satisfies the adult supervision requirement for receiving a supervising teacher permit from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO# 1: Analyze the role and responsibilities of a mentor in an early childhood setting.
  • Differentiate between the roles of adult supervision and mentoring.
  • Investigate the importance of utilizing multiple learning styles when mentoring others.
  • Analyze the developmental stages and learning strategies of teachers and supervisors.
  • Develop reflective strategies to enhance their own practices and communication with mentees.
  • SLO# 2: Recommend respectful interactions among all learners: children, staff and parents.
  • Provide appropriate models, guidance and evaluation for a teaching team, children and families.
  • Articulate and apply ethical principles to resolve complex issues.
  • Demonstrate for the members of a teaching team how to develop and maintain a safe and developmentally appropriate learning environment for young children.
  • Use evidence-based practice to plan and implement collaborative relationships amongst children, families and staff.
  • Utilize effective communication strategies to motivate staff, families and children.
  • SLO# 3 Analyze the role of a mentor in leadership and advocacy in the field of early childhood education.
  • Develop and apply advocacy strategies that facilitate positive outcomes.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the legislative process and laws impacting the early care and education field.
  • Exhibit a commitment to professional development and leadership skills.

ECE 430 Culture and Diversity in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); AA/AS Area VI
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 230
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers culturally responsive care and education in early childhood settings. It includes the study of socio-cultural, and political issues as they vary across the diverse cultures represented in the classroom and how they impact a child's development. Included are strategies for helping children negotiate and resolve conflicts caused by cultural differences, with a focus on using an anti-bias approach in the classroom. The contribution of historically underrepresented groups to society will be addressed with the intention of promoting the concepts of equality, justice and inclusion for all aspects of human diversity (culture, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, ability, and age). Teaching strategies which prevent and eliminate the development of prejudice and racism in growing children will be covered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO # 1: Compare and contrast theories and identify ways in which cultural and family patterns affect children’s behavior and identity.
  • Distinguish stereotypic and biased classroom materials and environments.
  • Describe various techniques teachers can use when responding to children developing discriminatory behaviors.
  • Define and assess the impacts of factors such as language, ethnicity, religion, immigration, and economic class in the personal history of the student and the subsequent impact on teaching young children and families.
  • SLO # 2: Analyze various aspects of children’s experience as members of families targeted by social bias considering the significant role of education in reinforcing or contradicting such experiences.
  • Assess his/her own cultural background and upbringing and identify how this experience impacts personal perceptions of others.
  • Defend the anti-bias perspective in their everyday interactions with children and families.
  • Analyze their own biases and how to avoid transmitting them to children.
  • SLO # 3: Compose rationale and goals for a multicultural, anti-bias early childhood program.
  • Distinguish stereotypical and biased classroom materials and environments.
  • Apply a variety of strategies for creating partnerships with parents through building mutual, collaborative relationships, and to challenge bias and injustice in the lives of their children.
  • Create environments that promote justice, equality and inclusion.
  • Create opportunities for children to become advocates and active participants in their communities.
  • SLO# 4: Evaluate the Anti-Bias theoretical framework and how it affects children's growth and development.
  • Assess how children develop an awareness of differences and how prejudice is formed in the early years.
  • Identify ways in which cultural and family patterns affect children's behavior and learning.
  • Evaluate inclusive classroom environments, materials and approaches that are developmentally, culturally and linguistically appropriate to specific groups of children.
  • SLO# 5: Distinguish stereotypical and biased classroom materials and environments.
  • Build environments that illustrate an Anti-Bias perspective through celebrating diversity; age, culture, gender, ability, sexual orientation, religion, race and ethnicity.
  • SLO# 6: Examine how children develop an awareness of differences and how prejudice may be formed during the early years.
  • Assess how children develop an awareness of differences and how prejudice is formed in the early years.
  • Integrate the nature and processes of systemic and internalized privilege and oppression and their impacts on children’s identity development and learning.
  • Identify and assess the overt and covert ways in which stereotypes and prejudice are learned.
  • Explore the unique and overlapping issues in racism, sexism, classism, heterosexism, ableism, and ethnocentrism as they relate to children and to early childhood settings.
  • Explore and define issues of cultural identity including factors such as language, ethnicity, religion, immigration, and economic class - in relationship to children, families, and early childhood settings.
  • Demonstrate strategies for helping children negotiate and resolve conflicts caused by cultural, class and gender differences, with a focus on using anti-bias approaches in the classroom.
  • Construct multicultural curriculum which promotes understanding of diversity and elimination of stereotypical themes.

ECE 494 Topics in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must verify paid registration to the conference.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Designed to give students an opportunity to study topics in Early Childhood Education which are not included in current course offerings. Topics may include, but are not limited to: Management of Family Day Care Homes; Guidance of the Special Child in Everyday Living; Behavior and Discipline; Children in Crisis; The Single Parent Family; and Cross-Cultural Experiences with Children and Families.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Assess childhood as a unique and valuable stage of the human life cycle
  • compile information to base work with children on knowledge of child development
  • evaluate the support for the close ties between the child and the family
  • recognize that children are best understood in the context of family, culture and society
  • defend the dignity, worth and uniqueness of each individual (child, family member and colleague)
  • apply information to help children and adults achieve their full potential in the context of relationships that are based on trust, respect and positive regard
  • implement new creative strategies and resources into their teaching in early childhood programs

ECE 495 Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

ECE 498 Work Experience in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position or job related to career goals in Early Childhood Education.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment in their major field of study or advancement within their career. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. Appropriate level learning objectives are established by the student and the employer. During the semester, the student is required to participate in a weekly orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. Work Experience may be taken for a total of 16 units when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR IN A FIELD OF STUDY RELATED TO ONE’S CAREER.(SLO 1)
  • Understand the effects time, stress, and organizational management have on performance.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of consistently practicing ethics and confidentiality in a workplace.
  • Examine the career/life planning process and relate its relevancy to the student.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of basic communication tools and their appropriate use.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of workplace etiquette.
  • DESCRIBE THE CAREER/LIFE PLANNING PROCESS AND RELATE ITS RELEVANCY TO ONE'S CAREER.(SLO 2)
  • Link personal goals to long term achievement.
  • Display an understanding of creating a professional first impression.
  • Understand how networking is a powerful job search tool.
  • Understand necessary elements of a résumé.
  • Understand the importance of interview preparation.
  • Identify how continual learning increases career success.
  • DEMONSTRATE APPLICATION OF INDUSTRY KNOWLEDGE AND THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AS WRITTEN IN LEARNING OBJECTIVES IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE EMPLOYER WORK SITE SUPERVISOR.(SLO 3)

Early Childhood Education, A.A. Degree

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Early Childhood Education, A.S.-T Degree

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Early Childhood Education, A.S.-T Degree, IGETC

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Early Childhood Education, Associate Teacher, Certificate of Proficiency

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Early Childhood Education, Infant Specialist, Certificate of Achievement

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Early Childhood Education, Master Teacher, Certificate of Achievement

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Early Childhood Education, School Age Child Care and Education, Certificate of Achievement

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Early Childhood Education, Site Supervisor, A.A. Degree

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Early Childhood Education, Teacher, Certificate of Achievement

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Elementary Teacher Education, A.A.-T Degree

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Elementary Teacher Education, A.A.-T Degree, IGETC

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