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African American college courses students can take.

Art/Art History

ARTH 328 Survey of African Art

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C1; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3A; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is an introduction to the art and architecture of Africa in terms of its cultural and philosophical background; its materials and techniques; its aesthetic considerations; and its impact on 20th Century Western art.

ARTH 330 Survey of African-American Art

Folsom Lake College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ARTH 300 and ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course covers the visual arts and architecture of black artists in America. Topics include the roots of African-American art, the Harlem Renaissance, and the political and social representations of the African-American culture.

Dance and Theatre

DANCE 302 African Dance

American River College

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Course Family: Cultural Dance
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(a); CSU Area E2
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course covers basic movement from African and West African styles of dance. Afro-Haitian and Afro-Caribbean styles may also be included, as well as an investigation of the Dunham technique and process of African dance. It includes beginning level warmup, across the floor movement, and center combinations to varied drum rhythms. No previous dance experience is necessary. Field trips may be required.

DANCE 351-354 Urban Hip Hop I, II, III, IV

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Hip Hop Technique and Competition
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (* Any PE Activity courses combined: maximum credit, 4 units)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(a); CSU Area E2
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course includes basic urban-style Hip Hop moves and rapid level changes for floor work. Choreography is provided on a bare bones theme and developed according to individual style, ability and personal interpretation. The history of this genre and the traditional competitive elements of Hip Hop dance are examined, as well as the role of dance in Hip Hop culture. An opportunity for Freestyle, Old Style, Poppin', Lockin', and Dance Poetry exploration is offered.

English

ENGLT 330 African American Literature

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

A survey of the most representative African American writers from the slave narrative to the present. The comprehensive literary study includes analysis of significant historical and cultural influences.

ENGLT 486 Honors African American Literature

American River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (effective Fall 2021)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B (effective Fall 2021)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is an advanced seminar on African American literature from the slave narratives to the present. This comprehensive literary study includes analysis of significant historical and cultural influences and relevant critical approaches and contexts in a variety of literary genres. In comparison to ENGLT 330, this honors course uses an intensive instructional methodology designed to challenge motivated students and cultivate advanced critical thinking skills. Instruction emphasizes critical thinking in a seminar style, where the focus is on analysis and evaluation of literature and literary theories. Honors students will also develop proficiency in library and internet-based research, make oral and written presentations, and participate in student-led group discussions. An MLA style research paper is also required. This course is not open to students who have completed ENGLT 330.

Ethnic Studies

ETHNS 320 The African American Experience

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Completion of ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or completion of ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This interdisciplinary course examines the social, political, economic, and cultural experience of racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States using concepts, theories, and terminology from distinct disciplines within the social sciences. As an ethnic studies course, it has a culturally relativistic approach. Specifically, this course redefines the lives of African Americans through their own experiences: from the inside looking out at the world. This course was formerly SOCSC 320.

History

HIST 320 History of the United States: African-American Emphasis

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (HIST 312 and 320 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D; CSU Area U1; CSU Area U2; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

U.S. History from the founding of Jamestown in 1607, through the Civil War. The course begins with a brief overview of the Black American's African heritage. It continues with the role played by African-American women as well as men in the growth and development of the nation. The U.S. Constitution and the establishment of American government institutions are also covered.

HIST 321 History of the United States: African-American Emphasis

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (HIST 313 and 321 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D; CSU Area U1; CSU Area U3; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

U.S. History from 1865 to the present, including coverage of the state and local government, with an increased emphasis on the role of black women as well as men, spelling out their specific contributions in the growth and development of the nation. It includes coverage of California state and local government.

HIST 360 History of African Civilizations

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course is an introductory survey of the history of Africa from earliest times to the present. Major topics will include origins of humanity and society, civilizations of the Nile Valley, the peopling of Sub-Saharan Africa, African societies to 1500 A.D. , precolonial Saharan and Sub-Saharan Africa, colonial Africa and the emergence of modern state in Africa.

HIST 486 History of the United States: African American Emphasis - Honors

Sacramento City College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D; CSU Area U1; CSU Area U2
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course covers the development of American Institutions and society through Reconstruction and partially fulfills American Institutions requirements for California State University and the University of California. The course emphasizes the role played by political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces in American society and the development of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative format. Beginning on the African Continent, this course will also examine the origins of the Atlantic Slave Trade and its implications for North American labor systems, including slavery. The course pays particular attention to the ways in which black people have influenced the formation and development of this nation; and examine the ways in which racial issues have shaped American society, culture, and politics. This class is conducted in a seminar format and uses intensive instructional methodology that is designed to challenge motivated students.

Honors courses are open to students who demonstrate an ability to write carefully reasoned, well-organized essays of varying lengths, are prepared to make clear oral presentations in class, and are able to actively contribute to seminar discussions. Credit may be earned for HIST 320 or HIST 486, but not both.

HIST 487 History of the United States: African American Emphasis - Honors

Sacramento City College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D; CSU Area U1; CSU Area U2 (effective Fall 2021)
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course covers the development of American Institutions and society from Reconstruction to the present and partially fulfills American Institutions requirements for California State University and the University of California. The course emphasizes the role played by political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces in American society and the development of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative format. Beginning with a review of the Civil War, HIST 487 closely examines the Reconstruction Era, the societal "place" of African Americans, the development of "Jim Crow" segregation, and the subsequent legal demise of segregation in American life. This course pays close attention to the ways in which African American people have subsequently shaped and contributed to American society, culture, and politics. This class is conducted in a seminar format and uses intensive instructional methodology that is designed to challenge motivated students.
Honors courses are open to students who demonstrate an ability to write carefully reasoned, well-organized essays of varying lengths, are prepared to make clear oral presentations in class, and are able to actively contribute to seminar discussions. Credit may be earned for HIST 487 or HIST 321, but not both.

Humanities

HUM 339 African American Humanities

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I (effective Summer 2021); AA/AS Area VI (effective Summer 2021); CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

This course examines African American experience in the United States through the products of culture created by Black Americans. The course synthesizes the production of music, art, literature, politics and philosophy to understand historic and contemporary influences and experiences of African American identity and expression. Students may be required to attend and analyze at least one live performance of the arts (music, theater, dance) or museum.

Political Science

POLS 303 Contemporary Politics of Africa

Sacramento City College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

Area Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to provide understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Area Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of past and contemporary African politics. The impact of language, culture, religion, colonialism, neo colonialism, free market, ideology, liberation and revolutionary movements, ethnic conflict and resolution, rise of populist leadership, indigenous politics, impact of global economic integration, and foreign and domestic policies will be examined in the region on a country-by-country basis. The course includes an examination of dominant political institutions, actors, processes, and belief systems within the context of political culture and an analysis of area political economy and foreign policy in the environment of global interdependence. Countries to be covered include but are not limited to Algeria, Angola, Egypt, Nigeria, Namibia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Ghana, Democratic Republic of Congo, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The course concludes with a summation of the region as it stands today and an assessment of where it is likely to go in the near future.

POLS 317 Global Studies: Africa

Cosumnes River College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2021

Global Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to gain understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Global Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of Africa. It covers the region's history, its independence movements and the modern day existence of nation states in the area to the twenty-first century. The impact of history, colonialism, the natural resource situation, socio-economics, ideology, conflict and resolution and foreign and domestic policies will be examined in the region on a country-by-country basis. The course includes an examination of dominant political institutions, actors, processes and belief systems within the context of political culture and history and an analysis of area political economy and foreign policy in the environment of global interdependence. The course concludes with a summation of the region as it stands today and an assessment of where it is likely to go in the near future.