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Ethnic Studies

Ethnic Studies (ETHNS) Courses

ETHNS 300 Introduction to Ethnic Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:August 1, 2022

This course introduces students to Ethnic Studies and the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances and intersectional identities of the four core Ethnic populations of Asian Americans, Chicana/o and Latina/o Americans, African Americans, and Native/Indigenous Americans within the United States.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Analyze and articulate concepts such as race and racism, racialization, ethnicity, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization, sovereignty, imperialism, settler colonialism, and anti-racism as analyzed in any one or more of the following: Native American Studies, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, and Latina and Latino American Studies.
  • Apply theory and knowledge produced by Native American, African American, Asian American, and/or Latina and Latino American communities to describe the critical events, histories, cultures, intellectual traditions, contributions, lived-experiences and social struggles of those groups with a particular emphasis on agency and group-affirmation.
  • Critically analyze the intersection of race and racism as they relate to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, language, and/or age in Native American, African American, Asian American, and/or Latina and Latino American communities.
  • Critically review how struggle, resistance, racial and social justice, solidarity, and liberation, as experienced and enacted by Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans and/or Latina and Latino Americans are relevant to current and structural issues such as communal, national, international, and transnational politics as, for example, in immigration, reparations, settler-colonialism, multiculturalism, language policies.
  • Describe and actively engage with anti-racist and anti-colonial issues and the practices and movements in Native American, African American, Asian American and/or Latina and Latino communities to build a just and equitable society.

ETHNS 320 Introduction to African American Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:August 1, 2022

This course introduces students to Ethnic Studies and the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances of African Americans within the United States. This course is interdisciplinary in nature and presents an overview of the cultural, economic, historic, social, and political issues in the life of African Americans in the United States. It will expose students of all ethnic backgrounds to the issues germane to the experience of African Americans in the United States. This course was formerly known as ETHNS 320 The African American Experience.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: Explain the concepts of Ethnic Studies-including but not limited to, race and ethnicity, racialization, equity, ethnocentrism, euro-centrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization and anti-racism.
  • SLO 2: Apply Ethnic Identity Theory, Conflict Theory, Critical Race Theory, Liberation and Cultural Capital theories
  • Objective 2A: Analyze critical events in the histories, cultures and intellectual traditions, with special focus on the lived-experiences and social struggles of African Americans, emphasizing agency and group-affirmation.
  • SLO 3: Critically discuss the intersection of race and ethnicity with other forms of difference affected by hierarchy and oppression, such as class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability and/or age.
  • SLO 4: Assess how struggle, resistance, social justice, solidarity and liberation as experienced by African American communities are relevant to current social and political issues.
  • SLO 5: Demonstrate active engagement with anti-racist issues, practices and movements to build a diverse, just and equitable society beyond the classroom.

ETHNS 330 Introduction to Asian American Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:August 1, 2022

This course introduces students to Ethnic Studies and the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances and intersectional identities of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. This course was formerly known as ETHNS 330 The Asian American Experience in America.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: Analyze and articulate concepts of Ethnic Studies, including but not limited to race and ethnicity, racialization, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization and anti-racism as they pertain to the lives of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs)
  • Introduce and define fundamental terms, concepts and theories in Ethnic Studies, including race and ethnicity, racialization, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization and anti-racism.
  • Apply Ethnic Studies vocabulary to understand the developing historical, political, cultural, psychological conditions under which Asian Americans have lived in the U.S.
  • Interpret and summarize various aspects of the Asian American experience in the U.S.
  • Explain the ideology of white supremacy as a means to understanding it (White Supremacy) as the organizing system of race relations in the U.S.
  • SLO 2: Apply Identity, Conflict, Critical Race, Liberation and Cultural Capital theories to describe critical events in the histories, cultures and intellectual traditions, with special focus on AAPIs' lived experiences, social struggles, and relationships with other historically defined racialized core groups (Native Americans, African Americans, and Chicanx/Latinx Americans), emphasizing agency and group-affirmation.
  • Construct and reconstruct AAPI lived experiences through Ethnic Studies theoretical frameworks.
  • Compare and contrast different theoretical perspectives within Ethnic Studies and with other academic disciplines
  • SLO 3: Critically discuss the intersection of race and ethnicity with other forms of difference affected by hierarchy and oppression, such as class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability and/or age, in the lives of AAPIs
  • Define intersectionality and describe how it is important for examining the complex lives of APPIs.
  • Describe the role of the institution of slavery in the development of the dominant group's social perception of Asian and Asian American subgroups in the U.S.
  • SLO 4: Describe how struggle, resistance, social justice, solidarity and liberation as experienced by AAPIs and other communities of color are relevant to current issues by using the vocabulary developed throughout the course
  • Discuss the social, cultural and structural conditions that compelled the Asian American social movements (collective action) and organizations in the U.S.
  • Use a historical comparative approach to explain the dimensions of progress for Asian Americans in the U.S.
  • SLO 5: Demonstrate active engagement with anti-racist issues, practices and movements to build a diverse, just and equitable society beyond the classroom
  • List and describe contemporary social issues facing Asian Americans in the U.S.
  • Discuss the likelihood of developing concrete solutions to address the contemporary issues uniquely facing Asian Americans in the U.S.

ETHNS 340 Introduction to Chicana/o/x Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:August 1, 2022

This course introduces students to the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances and intersectional identities of Chicana/o/x Americans within the United States. Specifically, this course examines and redefines the lives of Chicana/o/x Americans through their own experiences from the inside looking out at the world. This course was formerly known as ETHNS 340 Chicanos/Mexican Americans in the U.S.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: Explain the concepts of Ethnic Studies-including but not limited to, race and ethnicity, racialization, equity, ethnocentrism, euro-centrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization and anti-racism.
  • SLO 2: Apply Ethnic Identity Theory, Conflict Theory, Critical Race Theory, Liberation and Cultural Capital theories
  • Objective 2A: Analyze critical events in the histories, cultures and intellectual traditions, with special focus on the lived-experiences and social struggles of Chicanos/as/Mexican Americans, emphasizing agency and group-affirmation.
  • SLO 3: Critically discuss the intersection of race and ethnicity with other forms of difference affected by hierarchy and oppression, such as class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability and/or age.
  • SLO 4: Assess how struggle, resistance, social justice, solidarity and liberation as experienced by Chicanos/as/Mexican American communities are relevant to current social and political issues.
  • SLO 5: Demonstrate active engagement with anti-racist issues, practices and movements to build a diverse, just and equitable society beyond the classroom.

ETHNS 344 The Latino Experience in America

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Completion of ENGWR 101 or ESLW340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:August 1, 2022

This interdisciplinary course examines the social, political, economic, and cultural experience of racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States using concepts, theories, and terminology from distinct disciplines within the social sciences. As an ethnic studies course, it has a culturally relativistic approach. Specifically, this course redefines the lives of Latino American subgroups through their own experiences: from the inside looking out at the world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEVELOP A VOCABULARY THAT DESCRIBES THE UNIQUE EXPERIENCES OF LATINO AMERICAN SUBGROUPS IN THE U.S. (SLO 1).
  • Apply interdisciplinary vocabulary to understand the developing historical, political, cultural, psychological conditions under which Latino American subgroups have lived in the U.S.
  • Describe the push and pull factors that lead to both immigration and emigration for Latino subgroups.
  • Describe the various forms of nativism experienced by Latino subgroups as they settled in the U.S.
  • EXAMINE THE CULTURAL AND RACIAL STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN SOCIETY. (SLO 2).
  • Explain the ideological development of white supremacy as a means to understanding it (white supremacy) as the organizing social system of race relations in the U.S.
  • Understand the relationship between institutional power and social power within a social system.
  • Explain the relationship between the ideological development of white supremacy and its effect on Latino subgroups' agency in the U.S.
  • UNDERSTAND THE CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH LATINO SUBGROUPS BOTH ASSIMILATE AND ACCULTURATE AND FORM A LATINO AMERICAN IDENTITY. (SLO 3).
  • Explore and apply Social Identity Theory to describe identity formation for Latino American subgroups.
  • Explore and apply Ethnic Identity Theory to describe identity formation for Latino American subgroups.
  • Explore and apply stereotype threat to describe its impact in the unique experiences of Latino American subgroups brought on by dominant group perception in the U.S.
  • Describe the role of the institution of slavery in the development of the dominant group's social perception of Latino subgroups in the U.S.
  • Describe the role of Native American land encroachment in the development of the dominant group's social perception of Latino subgroups.
  • Describe the era of scientific racism and its role in the development of the dominant group's perception of Latino subgroups in the U.S.
  • Describe the role and process of ethnogenesis undertaken by Latino subgroups as they develop a Latino American identity in the U.S.
  • CRITICALLY EXAMINE THE ECONOMIC, PSYCHOLOGICAL, POLITICAL, AND CULTURAL PROGRESS OF LATINO AMERICAN SUBGROUPS IN THE U.S. (SLO 4).
  • Use a historical comparative approach to explain the dimensions of progress for Latino American subgroups in the U.S.
  • List and describe contemporary social issues facing Latino American subgroups in the U.S.
  • Use the vocabulary developed throughout the course to discuss the likelihood of developing concrete solutions to address the contemporary issues uniquely facing Latino American subgroups in the U.S.

ETHNS 350 Introduction to Native American Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 (College Composition) with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; CSU Area F
  • Catalog Date:August 1, 2022

This course introduces students to Ethnic Studies and the diverse institutional, cultural, and historical issues relating to the past and present life circumstances and intersectional identities of Native Americans/American Indians within the United States. This course is a survey of traditional cultures of Native Americans/American Indians focusing on the social, religious, economic, and artistic practices. The antiquity, distribution, and linguistic histories of Native American/American Indian cultures are integrated with the contemporary status of Native peoples regarding social change and adaptation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Analyze and articulate concepts such as race and racism, racialization, ethnicity, equity, ethno-centrism, eurocentrism, white supremacy, self-determination, liberation, decolonization, sovereignty, imperialism, settler colonialism, and anti-racism as analyzed in Native American Studies.
  • Apply theory and knowledge produced by Native American communities to describe the critical events, histories, cultures, intellectual traditions, contributions, lived-experiences and social struggles of those groups with a particular emphasis on agency and group-affirmation.
  • Critically analyze the intersection of race and racism as they relate to class, gender, sexuality, religion, spirituality, national origin, immigration status, ability, tribal citizenship, sovereignty, language, and/or age in Native American communities.
  • Critically review how struggle, resistance, racial and social justice, solidarity, and liberation, as experienced and enacted by Native Americans are relevant to current and structural issues such as communal, national, international, and transnational politics as, for example, in immigration, reparations, settler-colonialism, multiculturalism, language policies.
  • Describe and actively engage with anti-racist and anti-colonial issues and the practices and movements in Native American communities to build a just and equitable society.