Radio, Television and Film Production

Radio, Television, and Film (RTVF)

RTVF 295 Independent Studies in Radio, Television, and Film

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

RTVF 300 Mass Media and Society

  • Same As:JOUR 310
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID JOUR 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Survey of the mass media: history, philosophy, structure and trends, as well as theories which help to explain effects and the importance as a social institution. Exploration of economics, technology, law, ethics, and
social issues, including cultural and ethnic diversity. This course is the same as JOUR 310, and only one may be taken for credit. (C-ID JOUR 100)

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the basic vocabulary and concepts of mass communication verbally and in clear, concise English (SLO #1 GE Vb a).
  • define the various roles of mass media professionals.
  • compare and contrast the origins, development, functions and effects of various mass media.
  • research critically, filter the results and present them in a cogent manner (SLO #2).
  • evaluate the possible causes and suggest solutions to introductory problems of a conceptual nature using the methods appropriate to the study of Mass communication (SLO #3/ GE Vb b).
  • analyze the economics of the mass media.
  • assess the impact of media messages on various audiences.
  • recognize the use and misuse of social and behavioral science concepts in society including politics and the media (SLO #4/ GE Vb c).
  • identify basic media theories and their application to contemporary media use and behavior.
  • predict future roles and developments in mass media.
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions (SLO #5).
  • create a simple content analysis of a media product.
  • demonstrate that with the power of a communicator, comes moral and ethical responsibility (SLO #6).
  • explain and analyze the legal and ethical rights, regulations and responsibilities of the media in America.

RTVF 302 Introduction to Digital Design & Storytelling

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course explores computer-based images, text, graphics, narration, video and music in today's visual and social media. Students will analyze media literacy, audience, narrative elements, themes and the review of visual media through the lens of story structure.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Analyze media literacy.
  • Determine applicable uses for graphic, audio and video files in storytelling.
  • SLO# 2: Communicate through technology with an ever-expanding community, gather information, and produce content and create a narrative.
  • The ability to understand the process of creating a narrative through the use of production of visual images and sound
  • SLO #3: Express an analyses and interpretation of media applications and concepts.
  • SLO #4: Use vocabulary appropriate to the field.
  • SLO #5: Analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media forms from different cultures.

RTVF 304 Introduction to Multimedia

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:CISC 302 or JOUR 330
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to familiarize students with designing and producing multimedia presentations. Emphasis will be given to developing skills in producing photographic, graphic, video and audio materials used for the World Wide Web and multimedia presentations. The course presents a description and history of computer-interactive multimedia. Students explore current uses of these technologies and receive instruction in practical application. Each student conceives, writes, and designs a high-level multimedia program, using a user-friendly system. Some applications for multimedia include: professional presentations, specialized instruction research, Internet web pages, job training, interactive newsletters, computer games and point-of-purchase marketing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO# 1: Identify and explain fundamental theory, strategies and practices for communications and graphic design, including the need for research, target marketing, message design and script writing.
  • Recall terms and procedures typical in multimedia production.
  • Recognize and apply picture aesthetics, positioning and transitional elements.
  • Manipulate equipment building graphics, text and incorporating video, audio and special effects.
  • SLO #2: Recognize, recall and apply basic electronic communications issues including methods of title generation, palette manipulations, RGB/NTSC transfers, keying and phase errors.
  • Integrate at least one digitized image, animation and video clip into their presentation.

RTVF 305 Film History

  • Same As:FMS 305
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An introduction to the art of motion pictures, using both lectures and films. Students will briefly study the history of motion pictures and will view, evaluate, and critique films which are landmarks in the art of movie making. This course is the same as FMS 305, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of film and media forms and cultures (SLO-1).
  • analyze film critically through stylistic, narrative, and thematic analyzes.
  • critique and understand films as art, literature, and communication.
  • recognize, articulate, and judge the visual, verbal, and audio conventions through which images, words, and sounds make meaning in film and media texts (SLO-2).
  • critique the stylistic, narrative, and thematic concerns in major works of film art.
  • identify, understand, and evaluate the language of film narration, editing, and cinematography.
  • develop and apply the technical language of film art and industry in evaluating film production and direction.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the professional, technical, and formal choices that realize, develop, or challenge existing practices and traditions in film (SLO-3).
  • employ basic critical approaches (formalistic, psychological, socio-political, and generic) in analyzing films and their cultural implications.
  • evaluate the role of technologies in the development of film art.
  • assess what type of information is needed for a research question, problem, or issue and identify, evaluate and effectively apply this information in scholarly or visual projects (SLO-4).
  • describe the history, development, genre, and movements of the film medium and recognize the contributions of national, minority, diasporic, and subaltern filmmakers (SLO-5).
  • classify and critique the periods, movements, major figures, landmark films, genres, and codes of film.
  • compare and contrast the work of different directors and the concerns of different national cinema.
  • recognize and evaluate the contributions of women and minorities to film.

RTVF 306 Introduction to Media Aesthetics and Cinematic Arts

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the close analysis of film and television texts to students. It examines the broad questions of form and content, aesthetics and meaning, and history and culture. Students explore the diverse possibilities presented by the cinematic art form through an examination of a wide variety of productions, national cinemas, and film movements. Topics include modes of production, narrative and non-narrative forms, visual design, editing, sound, genre, ideology and critical analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Critically analyze film and television as a technology, business, cultural production/cultural artifact, entertainment medium and art form. (SLO #1).
  • Demonstrate the ability to critically analyze, interpret, and write about film and electronic media using film-specific language.
  • Demonstrate visual literacy through the application of the analytical tools of categories, theories and ideologies to understand the cinematic arts’ complex role and function in society.
  • Recognize, describe and analyze formal aesthetic elements of the cinematic arts. (i.e.: Cinematography, Editing, Mise-en-scene, Sound) (SLO #2)
  • Prepare analytical essays regarding the technical, aesthetic, and cultural aspects of the cinematic arts. (SLO #3)

RTVF 310 History of American Radio 1920-1950

  • Units:3
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An introductory study of radio as a cultural medium in American society from the 1920's to the 1950's. Examples from popular programs in comedy, news, sports, mystery and adventure, serials, music and drama are included. Formerly known as CMED 310.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • understand the unique qualities and contribution of radio from the 1920's to the 1950's (70% accuracy).
  • identify the characteristics of radio's most popular programs and personalities (70% accuracy).
  • analyze the sound-silence-music-dialogue combination used on certain radio programs to stimulate imaginative listener response.

RTVF 312 Beginning Radio Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory course in theory and application of audio production techniques for radio. Students will gain a basic understanding of audio equipment in both live and pre-recorded broadcasting. This includes recording equipment, mixers, digital audio production, radio program formats, broadcast writing and announcing skills. This course should be taken prior to Radio Workshop, RTVF 316.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Demonstrate knowledge of digital audio equipment.
  • Perform basic studio and non-studio audio recording tasks.
  • SLO #2 Combine voice, music and sound effects in the creation of a radio production suitable for airplay.
  • SLO #3 Identify modern radio formats, organization, terminology, and workplace responsibilities.
  • SLO #4 Articulate an understanding of radio and broadcast history.
  • Identify and explain the development of key concepts and events of radio and broadcast history that impact the media industry and operations.
  • Exercise basic critical approaches in analyzing radio and digital media and their mass audience implications.
  • SLO #5 Apply for internship experience at a local radio station.
  • Understand and identify local radio markets and the application processes for internship.

RTVF 315 Voice and Diction for Broadcasting

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is intended for all majors relating to broadcasting including radio production, communications media and television production. This course focuses on individual speech improvement through the study and practice of voice control and manipulation, proper breathing, and diction. Emphasis is placed on achieving correct pronunciation, enunciation, and voice production. Students will build on basic theories and practice of the interpretation of various oral selections chosen by the instructor and by the student.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate improvement in personal speech production within broadcasting(SLO #1).
  • Achieve effective, vivid, and expressive vocal variation.
  • Develop a pleasant vocal quality by eliminating such defects as breathiness, harshness, vocal fry, nasality, throatiness and/or hoarseness.
  • Develop control over the elements of pitch, rate, volume, accent, and inflection/intonation (SLO #2).
  • Identify, evaluate and apply appropriate articulation techniques.
  • Demonstrate proper microphone placement for public address or recoding (SLO #3).
  • Demonstrate critical listening skills of message content as well as the technical quality in recording.
  • Prepare scripts and written materials for oral presentations.

RTVF 316 Introduction to Radio Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:RTVF 312 or 319
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Through lectures and supervised labs, this intermediate radio production course explores current radio industry trends and practices. Students in the course will take part in the planning and producing of original radio programs for pod-casting and internet streaming.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Demonstrate an advanced understanding of the fundamentals of radio production.
  • Articulate, comprehend, recognize and demonstrate commercial radio station operations.
  • Demonstrate analog and digital techniques used in audio production.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills and conceptual problem-solving skills to create a portfolio of work in audio production.
  • Discuss, analyze and write about audio productions.

RTVF 319 Beginning Audio Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice of audio production for radio, television, film and digital recording applications. Students will learn the fundamentals of sound design and aesthetics, microphone use, and digital recording equipment. Students gain hands on experience recording, editing, mixing and mastering audio. Upon completion, students will have basic knowledge of applied audio concepts, production workflow, equipment functions, and audio editing software.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • understand basic physics of sound terminology; the sound wave, frequency/pitch, amplitude/loudness, phase, and timbre (SLO #1)
  • comprehend acoustics; microphone classification, placement and use; theory and practical use of consoles, computers and software; analog/digital recording and storage devices; patching; editing; time code; signal processors; loudspeakers
  • perform complex audio production techniques (SLO #2)
  • describe audio production software interface
  • demonstrate refined techniques for audio production using Pro Tools or other appropriate audio software
  • understand audio used in studio and on-location production for radio, television and film
  • create sound effects and original sound clips for dynamic media.
  • collect, create, analyze, and evaluate digital audio clips.
  • articulate the process of waveform editing.
  • outline the basic process for digitizing audio clips.
  • understand audio processes for voice recording, multimedia production, sound design
  • outline the basic process for digitizing audio clips
  • complete applied projects to assess the student’s knowledge of recording, editing, mixing, and balancing
  • evaluate and conduct both destructive and nondestructive waveform editing procedures
  • explore the emotional and physical perception of music, voice and sound and the aesthetics of audio mixing
  • demonstrate appropriate workplace behavior in a studio setting (SLO #3)

RTVF 330 Beginning Single Camera Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID FTVE 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an introduction to the theory, terminology, and operation of single camera video production, including composition and editing techniques, camera operation, portable lighting, video recorder operation, audio control and basic editing. This course focuses on the aesthetics and fundamentals of scripting, producing, directing on location, post production, and exhibition/distribution.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate both the technical and aesthetic aspects of video field production and knowledge of basic production techniques (SLO 1)
  • operate and set up portable video and sound equipment including camera and microphones and complete a basic edit of the material
  • incorporate professional pre-production planning including proper use of forms for scripting, budgeting, script breakdown and lists
  • operate video field recording equipment correctly to acquire quality video and audio products (SLO 2)
  • conceive and execute appropriate approaches to editing field footage into cohesive projects (SLO 3)
  • analyze professional and student work and evaluate proper technique and areas for improvement
  • apply post production theory (i.e. continuity and dynamic editing) plus basic operation for nonlinear editing including ingest, editing operation and distribution
  • demonstrate the skills needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment (SLO 4)
  • demonstrate through projects that with the power of a communicator, comes moral and ethical responsibility (SLO 5)
  • assemble a final individual project suitable for review and evaluation during a department showcase.

RTVF 331 Beginning Television Studio Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces theory, terminology and operation of a multi-camera television studio and control room. Topics include studio signal flow, directing, theory and operation of camera and audio equipment, switcher operation, fundamentals of lighting, graphics, video control and video recording and real-time video production.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO-1)
  • write original scripts, program proposals and reviews of professional and student work.
  • improve writing proficiency over time.
  • conceive and execute standard pre-production skills including planning, scripting, budgeting, and crew and equipment selection. (SLO-2)
  • categorize and explain different scripting formats and show rundowns.
  • plan group projects exploring how productions are developed.
  • utilize basic video production equipment correctly, safely and creatively, including cameras, lights and audio, and control room equipment such as audio mixers, switchers, video recording, character generation and teleprompter. (SLO-3)
  • describe essential post production equipment for audio and video editing. (SLO-4)
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-5)
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform appropriate critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or media employment. (SLO-6)

RTVF 340 Television Production Workshop I

  • Units:2
  • Hours:108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 331 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Within this course, students plan the total operational process for actual television programs (on air or closed-circuit), as well as participate in and take responsibility for various aspects of the finished program, such as camera operation, audio, switching, lighting, sets, graphics, editing and directing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English (SLO-1).
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in a business environment.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate an awareness of the effects of style, design and packaging in working with business professionals.
  • write increasingly complex scripts and program proposals for consideration as possible programs for production.
  • write in-depth reviews of professional and student work.
  • improve writing proficiency over time.
  • resolve and execute standard pre-production skills including planning, scripting, budgeting, and crew and equipment selection. (SLO-2)
  • categorize and explain different scripting formats and show rundowns.
  • plan group projects exploring how productions are developed in a professional way.
  • utilize all levels of video production equipment (consumer/professional) correctly, safely and creatively, including cameras, lights and audio, and control room equipment such as audio mixers, switchers, video recording, character generation and teleprompter. (SLO-3)
  • operate equipment safely according to professional standards.
  • utilize studio cameras, tripods, microphones, lights, dimmer boards, character generator, switcher/special effects generator with digital video effects (DVE).
  • explore increasingly complex approaches to program production including alternative angles, lighting, increased use of graphics and effects, and crew utilization and control.
  • operate an audio mixer correctly, setting levels, balancing multiple inputs, and meeting professional standards for quality.
  • participate as crew member in multiple student productions intended for broadcast on cable television.
  • operate essential post production equipment for audio and video editing. (SLO-4)
  • utilize non-linear editing equipment to produce individual and/or group projects incorporating digital capture into a computer, editing audio and video with graphics and exporting projects for use in student programming and other distribution methods.
  • analyze interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-5)
  • critique student production technique and process in written and verbal form.
  • describe advanced television production techniques and crew responsibilities, including anticipating common errors and how to avoid them.
  • criticize evaluate and react to student productions, explaining whether projects meet their anticipated goals.
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-6)
  • integrate theoretical program production application into practice with increasing understanding of appropriate professional conduct.

RTVF 341 Television Production Workshop II

  • Units:2
  • Hours:108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Within this course, students gain additional experience in creating television programming for cable TV, internet or DVD distribution. Besides production experience, they may take more active roles as producers, directors and production managers. Participation as production crew positions and with field remotes are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO-1)
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in a business environment.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate higher levels of effective communication for use in video and multimedia.
  • write increasingly complex scripts and program proposals demonstrating increased ability to combine writing and visual presentation techniques and audience effect.
  • improve writing proficiency over time.
  • resolve and execute standard pre-production skills including planning, scripting, budgeting, and crew and equipment selection. (SLO-2)
  • categorize and explain different show rundowns and broadcast approaches including fictional narrative, documentary and alternative approaches.
  • plan group projects exploring how productions are developed in a professional way.
  • utilize all levels of video production equipment (consumer/professional) correctly, safely and creatively, including cameras, lights and audio, and control room equipment such as audio mixers, switchers, video recording, character generation and teleprompter. (SLO-3)
  • operate equipment safely according to professional standards.
  • explore increasingly complex approaches to program production including both visual and audio aspects of communication.
  • operate essential post production equipment for audio and video editing. (SLO-4)
  • utilize non-linear editing equipment to produce individual and/or group projects incorporating digital capture into a computer, editing audio and video with graphics and exporting projects for use in student programming and other distribution methods.
  • incorporate advanced editing techniques, possibly including compositing, chroma key, and integrated graphics and animation from alternate computer software applications.
  • analyze interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-5)
  • critique student production technique and process in written and verbal form.
  • criticize evaluate and react to student and professional productions, explaining whether projects likely met their anticipated goals.
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-6)
  • integrate theoretical program production application into practice with increasing understanding of appropriate professional conduct.

RTVF 342 Television Production Workshop III

  • Units:2
  • Hours:108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 341 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for the production of new types of video programming for cable, business, industry and special groups - religious, ethnic, minorities, children, and women.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO-1)
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in broadcasting.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate increasing skill in using technology to communicate ideas.
  • write increasingly complex script focusing on special populations.
  • improve broadcast writing proficiency over time.
  • resolve and execute standard pre-production skills including planning, scripting, budgeting, and crew and equipment selection. (SLO-2)
  • categorize and explain different show rundowns and broadcast approaches including fictional narrative, documentary and alternative approaches.
  • plan group projects exploring how productions are developed in a professional way.
  • utilize all levels of video production equipment (consumer/professional) correctly, safely and creatively, including cameras, lights and audio, and control room equipment such as audio mixers, switchers, video recording, character generation and teleprompter. (SLO-3)
  • operate equipment safely according to professional standards.
  • explore increasingly complex approaches to program production including both visual and audio aspects of communication.
  • operate essential post production equipment for audio and video editing. (SLO-4)
  • utilize non-linear editing equipment to produce individual and/or group projects incorporating digital capture into a computer, editing audio and video with graphics and exporting projects for use in student programming and other distribution methods.
  • incorporate advanced editing techniques, possibly including compositing, chroma key, and integrated graphics and animation from alternate computer software applications.
  • analyze interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-5)
  • critique student production technique and process in written and verbal form.
  • criticize evaluate and react to student and professional productions, explaining whether projects likely met their anticipated goals.
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-6)
  • integrate theoretical program production application into practice with increasing understanding of appropriate professional conduct.

RTVF 343 Television Production Workshop IV

  • Units:2
  • Hours:108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 342 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for students preparing for industry jobs as producers, directors and production managers. Students provide focused attention in the process of pre-production, production and post-production. Participation as production crew positions and with field remotes is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO-1)
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for professional broadcasting.
  • recognize and correct major broadcast style writing error, including pronunciation notes, split page script formatting, and broadcast attribution for both audio and text generation.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate an awareness of the effects of style, design and packaging creating profession video projects for broadcast.
  • write increasingly complex scripts and program proposals for possible inclusion in a job portfolio.
  • improve writing proficiency over time.
  • resolve and execute standard pre-production skills including planning, scripting, budgeting, and crew and equipment selection. (SLO-2)
  • categorize and explain different show rundowns and broadcast approaches including fictional narrative, documentary and alternative approaches.
  • plan group projects exploring how productions are developed in a professional way.
  • utilize all levels of video production equipment (consumer/professional) correctly, safely and creatively, including cameras, lights and audio, and control room equipment such as audio mixers, switchers, video recording, character generation and teleprompter. (SLO-3)
  • operate equipment safely according to professional standards.
  • explore increasingly complex approaches to program production including both visual and audio aspects of communication.
  • operate essential post production equipment for audio and video editing. (SLO-4)
  • utilize non-linear editing equipment to produce individual and/or group projects incorporating digital capture into a computer, editing audio and video with graphics and exporting projects for use in student programming and other distribution methods.
  • incorporate advanced editing techniques, possibly including compositing, chroma key, and integrated graphics and animation from alternate computer software applications.
  • analyze interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-5)
  • critique student production technique and process in written and verbal form.
  • criticize evaluate and react to student and professional productions, explaining whether projects likely met their anticipated goals.
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-6)
  • integrate theoretical program production application into practice with increasing understanding of appropriate professional conduct.

RTVF 350 Intermediate Film / Digital Cinema Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 330 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a hands-on project-based opportunity for students to create single-camera projects using a Hollywood-style field production. Students focus on producing and directing skills as well as understanding the roles of field production crews. Development of narrative and documentary ideas for field production using both guerrilla and conventional set techniques are emphasized. Topics include scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, and non-linear editing. Off-campus field trips or production opportunities outside of class time may be required. This course may be taken twice for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO-1)
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in a business environment.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate an awareness of the effects of style, design and packaging in working with business professionals.
  • write project proposals, scripts, and evaluations of student and professional work.
  • resolve and execute standard pre-production skills including planning, scripting, budgeting, and crew and equipment selection. (SLO-2)
  • demonstrate proper use of standard film production forms, terms and techniques.
  • evaluate scheduling, planning and budgeting using standards designed to promote project success.
  • utilize basic film and video production equipment correctly, safely and creatively including cameras, lights and audio. (SLO-3)
  • practice appropriate safety techniques in film production.
  • demonstrate a capacity to critically evaluate changing production situations and adapt to newly defined production parameters.
  • operate essential post production equipment for audio and video editing and distribution in a variety of contemporary and emerging methods. (SLO-4)
  • demonstrate the ability to use non-linear editing equipment for import, editing of audio and video and export.
  • evaluate a variety of contemporary distribution formats and opportunities.
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-5)
  • demonstrate through projects that with the power of a communicator, comes moral and ethical responsibility. (SLO-6)
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-7)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the professional, technical, and formal choices that realize, develop, or challenge existing practices and traditions in film. (SLO-8)
  • describe a variety of methods for creative story-telling in a variety of genre.
  • experiment with non-traditional shots, angles and approaches to the visual image
  • produce projects that demonstrate an understanding of camera coverage, frame composition and mise-en-scene, camera perspective and blocking, editorial rhythm, pace, structure and style. (SLO-10)
  • create personal, individual projects by design through delivery.
  • identify job titles, roles and effectively participate in teams to create group-oriented projects from design to delivery.

RTVF 354 Audio Editing for Film & Video Post Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:RTVF 362; For best success, students taking Audio Editing for Film and Video using the Soundtrack Pro software, should complete RTVF 362 before taking this course.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This hands-on course provides understanding of how to edit audio and video files, repair field recordings, perform multi-track arranging and mixing, synchronize audio and video, analyze and fix common audio problems, and perform other creative sound design techniques. This course focuses on practical, professional techniques used to add music and sound effects to video and multimedia projects. This course is particularly designed for students who want to learn more about the basics of audio content creation, editing, and mixing in Soundtrack Pro as part of the Apple Final Cut Pro Studio. Students may choose to pay an additional fee and take an Apple Certified End User exam at the conclusion of this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use and define the terms and procedures used in the process of audio production and editing for film and video on a computer. (SLO-1)
  • operate essential post-production equipment for audio and video editing and distribution in a variety of contemporary and emerging methods. (SLO-2)
  • incorporate improved utilization of audio editing tools in the Final Cut Pro Studio.
  • plan, design, and revise projects using Apple's Final Cut Pro and Soundtrack Pro.
  • assemble projects by using prerecorded music, dialog and sound effects, or by creating original sound and music files.
  • explain and use Automated Dialog Replacement, editing dialog and other advanced mixing techniques.
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-3)
  • evaluate the aesthetics of projects and choose methods for improvement.
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-4)
  • plan and construct a final project utilizing the process demonstrated and export for use in film, a DVD, the Internet, or other multimedia production.

RTVF 360 Introduction to Motion Graphics: Adobe After Effects

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory motion graphics course for students interested in digital video, multimedia, 3-D computer animation, and emerging broadcast technologies. Students will gain hands-on experience with picture and video manipulation, 3-D composing, paint and draw applications for film, broadcast, multimedia and the Internet.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO-1)
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in a business environment.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • create digital media projects that demonstrate effective use of established design principles for typography, color, images, animation, sound and video (SLO-2)
  • plan, design and revise projects using Adobe After Effects.
  • assemble animation projects using filters, transitions and 3-D motion.
  • explain and use key frames, motion paths, layered elements and primary tools within Adobe After Effects.
  • describe and apply the basic principles and processes used in traditional and digital graphic and multimedia design. (SLO-3)
  • use and define the terms and procedures used in the production of motion graphics on a computer.
  • differentiate between pixel based objects and vector based objects and create 2-D elements for use in motion graphic animation.
  • operate essential post production equipment for audio and video editing and distribution in a variety of contemporary and emerging methods. (SLO-4)
  • plan and construct a final project utilizing the process demonstrated and export the animation as video, for a DVD / CD-ROM or for the Internet or other emerging technologies.
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-5)
  • evaluate the esthetics of projects and choose methods for improvement.
  • demonstrate through projects that with the power of a communicator, comes moral and ethical responsibility. (SLO-6)
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-7)

RTVF 361 Intermediate Motion Graphics: Adobe After Effects

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 360 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course presents an intermediate level exploration of the theory and practice of animation for video, film and the Internet. Students study the contemporary uses of the techniques of computer animation. Intermediate level skills are developed in Adobe After Effects including advanced techniques of graphic motion over time. Techniques for creating 3-D graphics are explored in depth. Exposure to additional computer applications may include Apple's Motion, Animation Master or others.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO 1)
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in a business environment.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate an awareness of the effects of style, design and packaging in working with business professionals.
  • describe and apply the basic principles and processes used in traditional and digital graphic and multimedia design. (SLO 2)
  • Analyze, describe and name the aesthetic value of motion graphics in communication for film, video, commercials, and the Internet.
  • operate Adobe's After Effects software for advanced compositing of graphics in motion over video and moving backgrounds. Students will produce projects in other software applications to create 3D models with extrusion to be used with elements exported into Adobe's After Effects.
  • formulate and construct layers video projects and prepare their computer projects for export to video tape, CD or DVD and the Internet.
  • explain and demonstrate a professional production approach and analysis of personal projects, other student work, and professional video projects. (SLO 3)
  • Operate 2-D and 3-D software correctly to create professional quality animations and video projects.(SLO 4)
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO 5)
  • evaluate their projects and contrast the quality of their work against the work of professionals and other students.
  • Produce a variety of individual projects utilizing correct design and implementation of professional theory and technique. (SLO 6)
  • assemble a finished animation/project, export to a computer file and print to tape as necessary following both written and verbal instructions.
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO 7)

RTVF 362 Digital Non-Linear Video Editing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will provide an overview of the theory and practice of nonlinear editing for video and film utilizing nonlinear digital editing work stations. Student will examine the technical and aesthetic requirements of editing through the use of professional film and video dailies. Projects will explore computer graphics, computer animation, audio/visual applications and digital video.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate both the technical and aesthetic aspects of non-linear editing and demonstrate knowledge of basic production techniques. (SLO 1)
  • demonstrate sound and picture continuity and multiple track manipulation including transitions and multi-cam editing function.
  • modify audio and video clips available in class to learn desktop non-linear video editing techniques including the use of timecode, on-line and off-line uses, and problems of RGB to NTSC transference.
  • design and construct projects with character generation, transitions and typical Hollywood style construction.
  • operate hardware and software building professional sound projects. (SLO 2)
  • utilize or create basic art/objects and import, modify pictures from the Internet.
  • compare and contrast theories about the future for video in support of multimedia, Internet applications and professional video including the commercial, corporate and mass media audience.
  • operate additional hardware including digital cameras, DVD players, VCR's, computer projections systems, and external digital storage devices like portable hard drives or Flash drives.
  • produce a final individual project utilizing correct design and implementation of professional theory and technique (SLO 3)
  • demonstrate how to move video from the computer back to video tape or as Quicktime movies for CD-ROM, DVD or the Internet.
  • critique professional and student work and evaluate proper technique and areas for improvement.
  • describe television technology and technique in spoken and written English (SLO 4)
  • define basic concepts of digital video including sampling rates, frame rates, compression, color and sound manipulation.
  • analyze terms and procedures typical in audio/video production and desktop editing.

RTVF 365 Intermediate Film & Video Editing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 362 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for previous users of non-linear editing software or for those wishing to increase their overall effectiveness with film and video editing software. This course helps students with improved project workflow, trimming shortcuts, advanced compositing, special effects and distribution for broadcast and film or in emerging technologies. Instruction also covers tips and tricks when using filters, nesting sequences and using variable speed controls to get movie quality effects.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO #1, pSLO-1)
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in a business environment.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate an awareness of the effects of style, design and packaging in working with business professionals.
  • operate essential post production equipment for audio and video editing and distribution in a variety of contemporary and emerging methods. (SLO #2, pSLO-5)
  • operate non-linear editing software using advanced techniques for audio, filters, effects, and efficient workflow.
  • produce videos that demonstrate an understanding of camera coverage, frame composition and mise-en-scene, camera perspective and blocking, editorial rhythm, pace, structure and style.
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO #3, pSLO-6)
  • recognize, describe and repair common editing errors including flash frames, improper video changes in transition, color or brightness issues and inappropriate audio levels.
  • demonstrate through projects that with the power of a communicator, comes moral and ethical responsibility. (SLO #4, pSLO-7)
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO #5, pSLO-8)
  • resolve cabling errors to locate and repair problems with the import and export of video between the software and hardware.
  • debate and defend production ideas in a group setting to resolve planning, design and implementation approaches to projects.

RTVF 368 Scriptwriting for Film, Video & Multimedia

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Students will learn the mechanics of scriptwriting and formating used for film and television as well as the writer's role in pre-production and production. Additionally, students are introduced to non-linear writing for new interactive multimedia technologies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Describe what a motion picture or television treatment is and why treatments are important.
  • Construct and pitch an idea and selling that idea, citing project cost, target audience, and why the project would be a success.
  • SLO #2: Produce an interactive multimedia product illustrating the use of a back-story for leading characters in scripts.
  • SLO #3: Work creatively with character, conflict, plot, theme, setting, dialogue, subtext, style, tone, genre, scene, sequence, act, climax, protagonist, antagonism, and other particular elements of the well-crafted screenplay.
  • Convey story ideas both orally and in writing with clarity, conviction and style.
  • Understand the role of screenwriters and others in the industry, and how to present screenplays and story ideas to industry gatekeepers.
  • SLO #4: Use vocabulary appropriate to the field.
  • SLO #5: Analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media forms from different cultures

RTVF 370 Broadcast Writing & Announcing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Students learn fundamental techniques of broadcasting with an emphasis upon speaking and writing. Students practice with specified formats in the television studio and radio workshop. Lab experiences and review of microphone use and performance in-front of the camera are included. A variety of non-news writing styles are explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English (SLO-1).
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in a professional environment.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate an awareness of the effects of style, design and packaging in working with broadcasting or industry professionals.
  • write increasingly complex scripts and program proposals for consideration as possible programs for production.
  • write in-depth reviews of professional and student work.
  • improve writing proficiency over time.
  • resolve and execute standard pre-production skills including planning, scripting, budgeting, and crew and equipment selection. (SLO-2)
  • categorize and explain different scripting formats and show rundowns.
  • plan group projects exploring how productions are developed in a professional way.
  • utilize production equipment (consumer/professional) correctly, safely and creatively, including an exposure to cameras, microphones, and lighting. (SLO-3)
  • demonstrate proper microphone placement.
  • examine a variety of performance techniques and styles for both sound and video.
  • practice appropriate warm-up techniques and drills in preparation for recording sessions.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to prepare and perform scene and monologues.
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-4)
  • critique student production technique and process in written and verbal form.
  • criticize, evaluate and react to student productions, explaining whether projects meet their anticipated goals.
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-5)
  • integrate theoretical program production application into practice with increasing understanding of appropriate professional conduct.

RTVF 371 Hollywood TV and Film Studios: A Behind the Scenes Experience

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 330 or 331 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview and introduction to video and film production techniques utilized by professionals in and around Hollywood, CA. Students will learn about the operation of motion picture and television studios from behind the scenes. A variety of topics including preproduction, production and post-production techniques, set design and lighting, and the history of Hollywood-style
production will be included. Guest speakers will provide a professional perspective on entry-level job skills and analysis of current workforce development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions. (SLO-1, PSLO-6)
  • analyze the relationships among working professionals in the technical and creative job categories of production.
  • develop an appreciation of the standards of professionalism in the workplace.
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment. (SLO-2, PLSO-8)
  • recognize various film, video or digital production techniques currently in use or under development
  • inventory entry-level job skills for employment at a major professional production facility.
  • compare and contrast major forces driving the entertainment industry from a cultural and economic perspective.

RTVF 376 Advertising

  • Same As:MKT 314
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the field of advertising, its history, purpose, institutions, and functions. Studies are made of the various media used in general advertising, as well as the effective use of these media. Students will produce ads and advertising campaigns. This course is the same as MKT 314, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: DEMONSTRATE THE ABILITY TO THINK CRITICALLY AND ANALYZE PROBLEMS.
  • Establish criteria for planning, advertising, and selecting appropriate media.
  • Evaluate state and federal laws applicable in the field of advertising.
  • SLO 2: DEMONSTRATE SKILL AND COMPREHENSION IN ADVERTISING FORMATS (AS INDICATED BY COURSE OUTCOMES).
  • Demonstrate an awareness of the importance of advertising in our economy and society.
  • Establish criteria for recognizing and analyzing various forms of advertising.

RTVF 378 Acting for the Camera

  • Same As:TA 356
  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RTVF 370 or TA 350 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area C1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory course in the theory and techniques of acting for film and video, comparing the differences between stage acting and acting for the camera. Scenes and commercials are enacted and played back on videotape for class critiquing. Students experience single camera and multiple-camera studio production and performance techniques. This course is the same as TA 356, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English (SLO-1).
  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of media productions (SLO-2).
  • analyze a scene from an observer's point of view and identify strengths and weaknesses of that presentation from a fundamental technique view point.
  • formulate alternative solutions to theatrical production situations as an on-camera participant in theatre productions (SLO-3).
  • demonstrate a firm foundation in the basic fundamentals of the craft of acting for the camera.
  • investigate the technical and stylistic differences between stage acting and acting for the camera.
  • demonstrate acting skills and talents in a video studio setting, and in a single camera out-of-order shoot.
  • demonstrate understanding of performance technique using microphones.
  • audition and/or perform in community, educational, or professional productions (SLO-4).
  • demonstrate through projects that with the power of a communicator, comes moral and ethical responsibility (SLO-5).
  • demonstrate a hands-on ability to perform the professional level critical thinking needed for successful teamwork in television, film or other media employment (SLO-6).
  • demonstrate performance techniques for work in professional commercials, industrial films, theatrical films, cable and broadcast video.
  • describe the steps involved in entering the business of acting for films and video.

RTVF 380 Broadcast Journalism

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:JOUR 300, RTVF 362, and RTVF 370; and the ability to type.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The student will gain a general knowledge of the field of radio/television news writing and production. Through theoretical and practical application, the student will understand and practice writing, filming, editing, and broadcasting radio and television news.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write in clear, concise English. (SLO #1)
  • write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling and punctuation suitable for use in a business environment.
  • recognize and correct major writing errors to eliminate fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • utilize appropriate presentation of written materials to demonstrate an awareness of the effects of style, design and packaging in working with business professionals.
  • research critically, filter the results and present them in a cogent manner. (SLO #2)
  • investigate and gather information for use in public presentation using library, Internet, and personal interviews.
  • structure and craft messages in ways appropriate for specific audiences, including through a variety of technical skills for use in multi-media, Internet, television, film or radio delivery. (SLO #3)
  • identify the varied responsibilities of Radio-TV-Internet News personnel.
  • explain functional aspects of the broadcast newsroom, including duties of the assignment editor, writer, anchor, reporter, sportscaster, producer and technical staff.
  • produce examples of professional-level work including writing, announcing, on-air performance and demonstrate the ability to work as a member of a team. (SLO #4)
  • demonstrate through projects that with the power of a communicator, comes moral and ethical responsibility. (SLO #5)
  • recognize and overcome biases, prejudices and limited viewpoints (including his or her own) so that he or she can communicate effectively in a diverse world.
  • analyze and observe local and network news reports and broadcasts for effectiveness and style.

RTVF 495 Independent Studies in Radio, Television, and Film

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

RTVF 498 Work Experience in Radio, Television and Film

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position or job related to career goals in Radio, Television and Film.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment in their major field of study or advancement within their career. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. Appropriate level learning objectives are established by the student and the employer. During the semester, the student is required to participate in a weekly orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. Work Experience may be taken for a total of 16 units when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR IN A FIELD OF STUDY RELATED ONE’S CAREER.(SLO 1)
  • Understand the effects time, stress, and organizational management have on performance.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of consistently practicing ethics and confidentiality in a workplace.
  • Examine the career/life planning process and relate its relevancy to the student.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of basic communication tools and their appropriate use.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of workplace etiquette.
  • DESCRIBE THE CAREER/LIFE PLANNING PROCESS AND RELATE ITS RELEVANCY TO ONE'S CAREER.(SLO 2)
  • Link personal goals to long term achievement.
  • Display an understanding of creating a professional first impression.
  • Understand how networking is a powerful job search tool.
  • Understand necessary elements of a résumé.
  • Understand the importance of interview preparation.
  • Identify how continual learning increases career success.
  • DEMONSTRATE APPLICATION OF INDUSTRY KNOWLEDGE AND THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AS WRITTEN IN LEARNING OBJECTIVES IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE EMPLOYER WORK SITE SUPERVISOR.(SLO 3)