Psychology

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 300 General Principles

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGRD 312, ENGWR 300, ESLR 320, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include scientific method, the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, consciousness, conditioning and learning, memory, cognition, developmental psychology, motivation, emotion, stress and health, personality, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, and social psychology. PSYC 300 is designed for psychology majors, behavioral science majors, and other students who desire a comprehensive overview of general principles of contemporary psychology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1. Differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and myth and conjecture about the topics of psychology and demonstrate understanding of psychological theory and scientific method.
  • compare and contrast the scientific method to other approaches to understanding human behavior.
  • compare and contrast experimental and non-experimental methods.
  • SLO #2. Evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.
  • reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on data derived from inquiry in the field of psychology.
  • recognize the ethical implications of psychological research and the responsibility to pursue and use knowledge wisely.
  • SLO #3. Compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in psychology, demonstrate knowledge of basic psychological terminology regarding behavior, cognition, and emotion, and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about psychology.
  • compare and contrast the major perspectives in psychology.
  • synthesize and/or apply knowledge of concepts, theory, and research findings surveyed within the following sub-disciplines in psychology: biology of behavior, sensation, perception, consciousness, conditioning and learning, memory, cognition, developmental psychology, motivation, emotion, stress and health, personality, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, and social psychology.
  • SLO #4. Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking.
  • SLO #5. Apply psychological principles to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth.
  • demonstrate the application of psychological principles to personal, interpersonal, occupational, and social contexts.
  • SLO #6. Recognize the complexity of social, cultural, and international diversity and the principles of equity, justice and inclusion in their lives.
  • demonstrate understanding of individual and sociocultural differences with respect to the topics addressed in general psychology.

PSYC 312 Biological Psychology

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; CSU Area B3; CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 5B; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the biochemical, cellular, and organismal physiological substrates of normal and abnormal behavior. The course content focuses on interactions of the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, endocrine and immune systems to produce consciousness, sensation, perception, thinking, motivation and emotion. These areas will be addressed within an evolutionary context that emphasizes developmental plasticity of the individual and the species. Current methods of obtaining data (e.g. neuroimaging techniques) will be examined and evaluated. Students will be required to perform anatomical identification of brain structures using a mammalian brain (e.g. sheep brain).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1. Differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and myth and conjecture about the topics of psychology and demonstrate understanding of psychological theory and scientific method.
  • compare and contrast the scientific method and other approaches to understanding human behavior.
  • evaluate current physiological research methods such as ablations, skin conductance levels (SCL), evoked-response potentials via electroencephalogram (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET).
  • understand cognitive neuropsychology and evaluate neuropsychological testing.
  • SLO #2. Compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in biopsychology, demonstrate knowledge of basic psychological terminology regarding behavior, cognition, and emotion, and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about biopsychology.
  • analyze behavior at biochemical, cellular and organismal levels.
  • identify parts of the neuron and describe their action potentials as a result of naturally-occurring neurotransmitters, hormones, and cytokines.
  • recognize how an organism’s physiology and behavior have been fine tuned by its ontological (individual) development and its phylogenetic (species) development.
  • identify structures of the nervous, endocrine and immune systems and their interactions.
  • SLO #3. Evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.
  • test hypothesis through application of scientific method in the context of biopsychological inquiry.
  • demonstrate familiarity with the APA guidelines for ethical research with humans and animals.
  • evaluate the implications of biopsychological research findings and demonstrate familiarity with bioethical issues.
  • SLO #4. Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking.
  • SLO #5. Apply psychological principles to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth.
  • describe the etiology and outcomes of neurological diseases such as psychoses, cognitive disorders, mood disorders and motor disorders.
  • predict the actions of pharmacological agents and explain how they exert their effects in domains such as eating, sexuality, consciousness, sleep, motor activity, mood and addiction.

PSYC 320 Social Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 170
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on the scientific study of human interaction, with an emphasis on the individual within a social context. Study includes: social perception, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, the self and social identity, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, social influence, prosocial behavior, aggression, and group behavior.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1. Differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and myth and conjecture about the topics of social behavior and demonstrate understanding of psychological theory and scientific method.
  • compare and contrast the scientific method to other approaches to understanding social behavior.
  • compare and contrast experimental and non-experimental methods.
  • SLO #2. Evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.
  • reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on data derived from inquiry in the field of social psychology.
  • recognize the ethical implications of social psychological research and the responsibility to pursue and apply knowledge wisely.
  • SLO #3. Compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in social psychology, demonstrate knowledge of basic psychological terminology regarding social behavior and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about social psychological topics.
  • compare and contrast the major perspectives in social psychology.
  • synthesize and/or apply knowledge of concepts, theories, and research findings surveyed within the following lines of inquiry within the discipline of social psychology: social cognition, social perception, attitudes and attitude change, the self and social identity, prejudice and discrimination, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, social influence, prosocial behavior, aggression, and group behavior.
  • SLO #4. Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking.
  • apply critical thinking to the analysis of social behavior and related issues.
  • SLO #5. Apply social psychological principles to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth.
  • demonstrate the application of social psychological principles to personal, interpersonal, organizational, and social contexts.
  • SLO #6. Recognize the complexity of social, cultural, and international diversity and the principles of equity, justice and inclusion in their lives.
  • demonstrate understanding of individual and sociocultural differences with respect to the topics addressed in social psychology.

PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 120 or 125 with a grade of "C" or better; or the equivalent.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area B4; IGETC Area 2
  • C-ID:C-ID MATH 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on the concepts and applications of descriptive and inferential statistics in psychology and other behavioral sciences. Topics include: descriptive statistics; sample spaces and probability; random variables and expected value; discrete and continuous distributions -- binomial, t-tests for two populations; and applications using data from disciplines including business, social sciences, life science, health science, and education; parametric and nonparametric statistical methods, hypothesis testing, statistical inference and p-values, effect size and power; correlation and regression regarding prediction; chi-square; t-tests; and analysis of variance procedures. Application of both hand computation and statistical software (e.g. SPSS) to data in a behavioral and social science contexts will be emphasized to include the interpretation of the relevance of the statistical findings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1. Evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.
  • perform statistical calculations.
  • organize raw data appropriately and meaningfully.
  • identify and evaluate the appropriate statistical test to be used with specific research designs.
  • apply statistical tests in order to reach conclusions.
  • interpret scientific literature containing statistical analysis and to do so ethically.
  • SLO #2. Apply psychological principles to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth.
  • synthesize, evaluate and apply statistical knowledge and skills in educational, occupational and social contexts.
  • SLO #3. Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking.
  • demonstrate mathematical competency and the application of quantitative reasoning.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the analysis of data by computer using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).
  • critically analyze the application of statistics in scientific literature.
  • distinguish among different scales of measurement and their implications; apply concepts of sample space and probability; calculate measures of central tendency and variation for a given data set; identify the standard methods of obtaining data and identify advantages and disadvantages of each; calculate the mean and variance of a discrete distribution; calculate probabilities using normal and t-distributions; distinguish the difference between sample and population distributions and analyze the role played by the Central Limit Theorem; construct and interpret confidence intervals; determine and interpret levels of statistical significance including p-values; identify the basic concept of hypothesis testing including Type I and II errors; formulate hypothesis tests involving samples from one and two populations; Select the appropriate technique for testing a hypothesis and interpret the result; Use linear regression and ANOVA analysis for estimation and inference, and interpret the associated statistics.

PSYC 335 Research Methods in Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 and 330 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview of the methodologies used in experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental research in psychology. Students will learn how to design and conduct research, including formulating hypotheses, reviewing the literature, evaluating ethical issues, selecting methodologies, organizing data, applying statistics and writing reports.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1. Differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and myth and conjecture about the topics of psychology and demonstrate understanding of psychological theory and scientific method.
  • compare and contrast the scientific method to other approaches to understanding human behavior.
  • compare and contrast experimental and non-experimental methods.
  • SLO #2. Evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.
  • formally state hypotheses and test them using the scientific method.
  • conduct a thorough literature review.
  • choose appropriate research design, methodology, and statistical analyses in support of a specific hypothesis.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the APA Code of Ethics in the treatment of human and nonhuman participants in the design, data collection, interpretation, and reporting of psychological research.
  • design research studies which may include the following techniques: observation, interviews, focus group, surveys, case studies, correlational and experimental designs.
  • collect data and keep organized records.
  • reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on data.
  • recognize the ethical implications of psychological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely.
  • SLO #3. Compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in psychology, demonstrate knowledge of basic psychological terminology regarding behavior, cognition, and emotion, and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about psychology.
  • utilize APA style effectively in the production of a research report.
  • SLO #4. Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking.
  • analyze and interpret data, draw appropriate conclusions and make recommendations.
  • analyze data using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software.
  • SLO #5. Apply psychological principles to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth.
  • relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how psychological information is relevant to personal and community issues.
  • reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on data derived from inquiry in the field of psychology.
  • use appropriate computer software, databases, and other technology to enhance knowledge.
  • identify the components of evaluation research and its application.

PSYC 340 Abnormal Behavior

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an exploration of the broad questions of normality and abnormality. It offers the investigation of specific mental, emotional, and behavioral difficulties and current approaches to psychological intervention including present community mental health practice. This course considers the contribution of biological, psychological and social factors to the development and persistence of behavior disorders. PSYC 340 is a useful course for students majoring in Human Services and/or preparing for a career in psychology or the helping professions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and myth and conjecture about the topics of abnormal psychology and demonstrate understanding of psychological theory and scientific method. [SLO #1.]
  • compare and contrast the scientific method and other approaches to addressing abnormal behavior.
  • compare and contrast experimental and non-experimental methods.
  • apply the DSM-V classification system and evaluate approaches to clinical assessment and the diagnosis of psychological disorders.
  • Compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in abnormal psychology, demonstrate knowledge of basic psychological terminology regarding behavior, cognition, and emotion, and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about abnormal psychology. [SLO #2.]
  • compare and contrast the major perspectives in the study of psychopathology.
  • identify and describe specific mental, emotional, and behavioral difficulties.
  • synthesize and appraise the contributions of biological, psychological, and social factors to the development and persistence of behavioral disorders.
  • evaluate issues that pertain to people experiencing severe problems in adaptive behavior.
  • Evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems. [SLO #3.]
  • reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on data derived from inquiry in the field of abnormal psychology.
  • think critically with respect to individual expression of psychological disorders and to community and social issues that pertain.
  • recognize the ethical implications of research in the field of psychopathology and the responsibility to pursue and use empirical knowledge wisely.
  • Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking. [SLO #4.]
  • Apply psychological principles to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth. [SLO #5.]
  • compare, contrast, and evaluate medical, behaviorist, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic and other approaches to psychological intervention including present community health practices.
  • apply theories of change to behavioral issues involving "diseases of lifestyle"; such as substance abuse, eating disorders, and stress related disorders.
  • Recognize the complexity of social, cultural, and international diversity and the principles of equity, justice and inclusion in their lives. [SLO #6.]
  • demonstrate understanding of individual and cultural differences pertaining to the topics addressed in the study of psychopathology and psychotherapy.
  • demonstrate understanding of clinical ethics, patients' rights, and the broader sociopolitical issues associated with the problem of abnormal behavior.

PSYC 356 Human Sexuality

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a balanced scientific understanding of human sexual thoughts, feelings, and behavior grounded in both female and male perspectives and experiences. Course topics include an examination of the methodology of sexology, gender issues, sexual anatomy and physiology, sexual arousal and response, love and communication, sexual behavior patterns, sexual orientations, contraception, conception and childbirth, sexual development across the lifespan, adult living patterns, sexual difficulties and solutions, sexually transmitted diseases, atypical sexual behavior, sexual coercion, and pornography and prostitution.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1. Differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and myth and conjecture about the topics addressed by the study of human sexuality and demonstrate understanding of psychological theory and scientific method.
  • Compare and contrast experimental and non-experimental methods.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of social/historical context and politics on human sexual thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.
  • Dispel myths, doubts, and anxieties related to knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors about sexuality.
  • SLO #2. Compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in the study of human sexual behavior, demonstrate knowledge of basic biological, psychological, and socio-cultural terminology regarding sexual behavior and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about human sexual behavior.
  • compare and contrast the major perspectives in the study of human sexual behavior.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the key sex research findings.
  • identify and explain the processes involved in female and male reproductive and sexual physiology and interpersonal attachment.
  • develop an understanding of variation in human sexual behavior and motivation.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the factors that influence sexual development and interaction across the life span.
  • describe the causes and correlates of sexual difficulties and variances.
  • identify and explain the mechanisms and associated issues relevant to contraception, conception, pregnancy, labor and birth, breastfeeding, and postpartum sexuality.
  • compare and contrast approaches that offer alternatives to conventional pregnancy.
  • identify guidelines for safeguarding and improving sexual health and well being.
  • identify guidelines for improving the health and well-being of the new mother, her partner, her newborn, and her family.
  • compare and contrast the symptoms and impact of common sexually transmitted diseases.
  • demonstrate an understanding of medical risk and vulnerability.
  • identify guidelines for safeguarding sexual health and well-being.
  • recognize the defining features of sexual coercion, pornography, and prostitution and their implications for behavior.
  • compare and contrast the research findings on rape, incest, sexual harassment, pornography, and prostitution.
  • compare and contrast effective and ineffective communication strategies.
  • SLO #3. Evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.
  • recognize the ethical implications of research in the study of human sexual behavior and the responsibility to pursue and use empirical knowledge wisely.
  • reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on data derived from inquiry in the field of human sexual behavior.
  • apply critical thinking skills to the analysis of research findings on sexual motivation, variety, difficulties, and issues.
  • SLO #4. Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, moral reasoning, decision-making, and critical thinking.
  • think critically with respect to individual expression of human sexual behavior and to community and social issues that pertain.
  • apply critical thinking skills to the analysis of research findings on child, adolescent, and adult sexuality.
  • SLO #5. Apply biopsychosocial principles derived from the study of human sexual behavior to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth.
  • apply communication skills for sharing thoughts and feelings about human sexuality.
  • apply critical thinking skills to the analysis of research findings on sexual behavior.
  • apply critical thinking skills and guidelines for avoiding and/or coping with nonconsensual and/or gratuitous sexual circumstances.
  • comprehend the implications of this knowledge for daily life.
  • make responsible and intelligent choices based on personal needs, desires, and values rather than on elements like guilt, fear, pressure, or ignorance.
  • SLO #6. Recognize the complexity of social, cultural, and international diversity and the principles of equity, justice and inclusion in their lives.
  • demonstrate understanding of individual and cultural differences pertaining to the topics addressed in the study of human sexual behavior.
  • demonstrate understanding of the ethical issues and broader sociopolitical issues associated with the study of human sexual behavior.

PSYC 368 Cross Cultural Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores the impact of cultural influences on the psychological and individual development of ethnic group members. Emphasis will be placed on integrating traditional theoretical approaches and current cross-cultural statistical research and theory in the study of African-Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, gays & lesbians, the elderly, and the disabled.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1. Differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and myth and conjecture about the topics of cross cultural psychology and demonstrate understanding of psychological theory and scientific method.
  • compare and contrast research biases in the study of individuals from diverse populations.
  • research psychological concepts applied to diverse groups from a theoretical perspective and research orientation.
  • SLO #2. Compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in cross cultural psychology, demonstrate knowledge of basic psychological terminology regarding behavior, cognition, and emotion, and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about cross cultural psychology.
  • define culture; ethnic group demographics; family and gender roles; collectivism and individualism; research methodologies; identity formation and ethnicity; stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination; cognition and intelligence; language, bilingualism and non verbal communication; psychosocial stressors; and behavior disorders.
  • demonstrate an understanding of, describe, and critically analyze the research on the impact of culture and minority status on basic psychological processes.
  • describe and analyze specific empirical studies of psychological issues among diverse individuals.
  • synthesize the research on the influence of culture on issues related to physical and mental health.
  • SLO #3. Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking.
  • SLO #4. Evaluate cross cultural psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.
  • demonstrate an understanding of cross cultural research and its application to minority populations identified issues and problems.
  • SLO #5. Apply cross cultural psychological principles to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth.
  • understand and analyze psychological issues related to individual and institutionalized ethnocentrism, stereotyping, and prejudice, including recognizing one's own ethnocentrism, stereotypes and prejudice.
  • SLO #6. Recognize the complexity of social, cultural, and international diversity and the principles of equity, justice and inclusion in their lives.
  • explain how issues of diverse populations are interwoven with social and political institutions.

PSYC 371 Life Span Developmental Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines psychological development across the lifespan, from conception to death. The course will focus on neurological, cognitive, cultural, and socio-emotional domains of developmental psychology, as well as the interaction among these domains. The course will provide a theoretical background based on empirical studies in the area of developmental psychology and other related disciplines. This course is designed to provide a foundation for careers in educational, social, psychological, and medical fields as well as provide students with a better understanding of one's own developmental process.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1. Differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and myth and conjecture about the topics of life span developmental psychology and demonstrate understanding of developmental psychological theory and scientific method.
  • compare and contrast the scientific method to other approaches to understanding human development.
  • compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in life span developmental psychology, demonstrate knowledge of basic psychological terminology regarding behavior, cognition, and emotion, and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about life span developmental psychology.
  • SLO #2. Evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems.
  • reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on data derived from inquiry in the field of developmental psychology
  • recognize the ethical implications of psychological research and the responsibility to pursue and use knowledge wisely.
  • SLO #3. Compare and contrast the major theoretical orientations in life span developmental psychology, demonstrate knowledge of basic psychological terminology regarding behavior, cognition, and emotion, and be able to express this clearly when writing or speaking about life span developmental psychology.
  • synthesize and/or apply knowledge of concepts, theory, and research findings surveyed within the field of life span developmental psychology.
  • SLO #4. Integrate content knowledge, cognitive and affective skills and technical proficiency in completing exams, term papers, presentations and other class assignments. These skills include: ambiguity tolerance, learning, memory, logical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking.
  • SLO #5. Recognize the complexity of social, cultural, and international diversity and the principles of equity, justice and inclusion in their lives.
  • demonstrate understanding of individual and sociocultural differences with respect to the topics addressed in life span developmental psychology.
  • SLO #6. Apply life span developmental psychological principles to the development of interpersonal, occupational and social skills and life-long personal growth.
  • demonstrate the application of life span developmental psychological principles to personal, interpersonal, occupational, and social contexts.

PSYC 495 Independent Studies in Psychology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.