Political Science

Political Science (POLS)

POLS 301 Introduction to Government: United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process for eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D8; CSU Area F2; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An introduction to Political Science, American government and politics. Structured to promote political and analytical understanding and thinking regarding American politics and government. Areas of concentration include principles, institutions, problems, processes, theory, philosophy, and ideology. Satisfies the State requirement regarding the Constitution, American Institutions, and State and Local Government.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: demonstrate comprehension of the complexity of the American democratic system.
  • define key terms used in the study of the American system.
  • explain how the American system affects the student's life in terms of freedoms, restraints, and public policy.
  • SLO #2: explain the conditions and values necessary for political democracy to exist.
  • SLO #3: illustrate the relationship between national, state and local governments and evaluate the effectiveness of the federal system.

POLS 302 Introduction to Government: Foreign

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • C-ID:C-ID POLS 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a comparative study and analysis of political systems, ideologies, institutions, policies, cultures, histories, and the development of selected foreign governments. Special emphasis is placed on the cultural and social dimensions of political behavior and attitudes in connection with governmental and political practices typical of particular geographical regions. Coverage includes an examination of selected developed and lesser developed nation-states from a global perspective.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze, synthesize and explain the differences and similarities of world governments as to their composition, function and policies (SLO #1)
  • identify problems and prospects of specific nations by utilizing comparative data analysis or demographics.
  • demonstrate an understanding of cultures through politics, political culture, popular civic participation (SLO #2)
  • compare specific countries by identifying common denominators and symbiotic relationships

POLS 304 Introduction to Government: California

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the essential organization, institutions, and processes of California state and local government. It fulfills the California State University requirement for state and local government, but not the requirement for the U.S. Constitution.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Assess the relationship between citizens and the state of California with emphasis on the impacts of cultural, economic, political, and social diversity
  • SLO #2 Describe the various institutions of California government and how each functions in the policymaking process
  • SLO #3 Compare and contrast the California and U.S. Constitutions and the effect of these differences on policy making, civil rights and liberties, and political behavior
  • SLO #4 Analyze the effects of structural differences between the federal model and the structure of California government institutions on the policy making process and political behavior
  • SLO #5 Examine public financing in California and analyze the interconnectedness of federal, state, and local budgets
  • SLO #6 Analyze public opinion and the political behavior of California citizens
  • Compare and contrast the structure of California government and the federal model

POLS 310 Introduction to International Relations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better; or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process for eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • C-ID:C-ID POLS 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introduction to international relations and a survey of the nation-state system, techniques of interaction, the issue of war, nationalism, power alignments, international actors, transnational movements, diplomacy, political economy, and perceptions in world politics. Particular emphasis is placed on an analysis of the world outlook of Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, the United States, the major western allies, China, and the lesser developed world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the field of International Relations and global analysis (SLO #1)
  • examine the historical development of the academic field of International Relations.
  • compare and contrast the models and theories basic to the study of International Relations.
  • provide an in-depth analysis of the primary topics of focus of the field, including but not limited to: Power, Balance of Power, Ideology, International Security, The Formulation and Implementation of Foreign Policy, the Causes and Nature of War, International Political Economy, Transnational Movements, Diplomacy, and International Trade, Monetary Exchange, Law, and Organizations.
  • recognize the nature of problems, and importance of, the current nation-state system (SLO #2)
  • relate the reasons behind, and nature of, the perceptions of global politics and issues held by the United States, Russia, China, America’s allies and the lesser developed nations-states of the world.
  • think criticially regarding the subject of global politics necessary for success in higher education.

POLS 311 International Political Economy

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to introduce students to the major theories, institutions and issues in international political economy. International political economy examines the interaction between politics and economics on a global scale; in particular, how political forces influence markets, and how market forces influence politics. In this course of study, students will examine the major theoretical perspectives on political economy, such as mercantilism, liberalism, Marxism and statism. Students are then introduced to the major components of the international economy: multilateral trade, domestic trade policy, international finance and currency policy. Last, this course focuses on several major issues in international political economy. Examples might include the gap between the developed and developing world, the globalized economy, the role of transnational corporations, the political economies of oil, migration, food, or the environment.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF STATES, OF MARKETS, AND HOW THEY INTERACT. (SLO#1)
  • Understand the different priorities of states and markets and how they allocate resources differently.
  • Understand the different degrees of state-market interaction, including but not limited to laissez faire capitalism, social market systems (mixed systems) and command economies.
  • EXAMINE THE MAJOR THEORETICAL APPROACHES TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO MERCANTILISM/NEO-MERCANTILISM, LIBERALISM/NEO-LIBERALISM, RATIONAL CHOICE THEORY AND MARXIST CRITIQUES. (SLO#2)
  • Understand the linkages between mercantilism/neo-mercantilism and protectionist trade policy.
  • Examine Ricardo’s liberal theory of comparative advantage.
  • Understand the linkages between liberalism/neo-liberalism and free trade policy.
  • Understand the linkages between liberalism/neo-liberalism and its offshoots, including but not limited to Keynesianism.
  • Understand the contribution of rational choice theory and models to overcoming the problem of international economic cooperation.
  • Understand the contribution of Marxist critiques, including but not limited to Modern World Systems Theory and Dependency Theory, in challenging the premise of free trade and explaining the puzzle of uneven development.
  • Describe how globalization has increased the tension between mercantilism/neo-mercantilism and liberal/neo-liberal approaches.
  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE BASIC PREMISES OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND TRADE POLICY. (SLO#3)
  • Articulate the founding premises of liberal trade theory that everyone benefits from free trade and that free trade ensures the most efficient use of resources.
  • Identify common problems in trade cooperation.
  • Describe barriers to trade including but not limited to traditional tariff barriers and modern non-tariff barriers such as procurement practices, import quotas and protection of intellectual property.
  • Understand the terminology of international trade, including but not limited to such concepts as absolute and comparative advantage, and factor endowments.
  • Understand the history and development of the World Trade Organization (WTO).
  • Understand the role of the WTO in lowering the barriers to trade.
  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE DOMESTIC ORIGINS OF NATIONAL TRADE POLICIES. (SLO#4)
  • Identify the different ways in which capital, labor and other societal groups may interact to influence trade policy.
  • Describe the Stolper-Samuelson theory of factor endowments and varying trade preferences.
  • Describe the sectoral conflict model of competing preferences among exporting and importing economic sectors.
  • Describe the society- centered approach to explaining trade policy outcomes.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history of US trade policy, including but not limited to such events as the Smoot-Hawley Act, the gradual removal of trade policy from Congress and the rise of fast-track trade legislation.
  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FOUNDATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL FINANCE. (SLO#5)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of international finance, including but not limited to the balance of payments, capital and finance accounts, current accounts, surpluses, and deficits.
  • Describe the consequences of a current account imbalance, including but not limited to the effect on currency.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the system of exchange rates, including but not limited to the difference between fixed and floating exchange rates.
  • Describe the effect of inflation and interest rates on exchange rates.
  • Describe the concepts of international purchasing power, and strong versus weak currencies.
  • Examine government options for addressing balance of payment problems, including but not limited to currency manipulation, fiscal policy and monetary policy.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history of the international monetary system, including but not limited to the Bretton Woods system, the rise and role of the International Monetary Fund, the collapse of the Bretton Woods system, and international finance in a globalized world.
  • •DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROBLEMS BETWEEN THE DEVELOPED AND DEVELOPING WORLD (ALSO DESCRIBED AS NORTH-SOUTH RELATIONS). (SLO#6)
  • Describe the impact of colonization and de-colonization on the economies of the developing world.
  • Understand the premises, strengths and weaknesses of dependency theory.
  • Understand the linkages between dependency theory and the various economic policies of the developing world, including but not limited to autarky and Import Substitution Industrialization (ISI).
  • Describe the logic and policies of ISI as well as the outcomes of it.
  • Examine the history of foreign aid and foreign loans, including the accumulation of international debt.
  • Examine the history, responses to, and outcomes of the Latin American debt crisis.
  • Examine the Asian model of development.
  • Contrast the Latin American model of development with the Asian model.
  • Identify the current problems of development and approaches to solving the problems of development, including but not limited to micro-credit.
  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE CONCEPT AND ROLES OF A TRANS-NATIONAL CORPORATION (TNC). (SLO#7)
  • Identify the characteristics of a TNC.
  • Describe the different models of TNCs (vertically integrated versus horizontally integrated).
  • Describe the potential impacts of TNCs, including both the positive and negative impacts.
  • Describe the potential of a TNC to impact the political process.
  • Examine efforts on the part of states and the international community to regulate.
  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESS OF GLOBALIZATION AND ECONOMIC INTEGRATION. (SLO#8)
  • Examine the history of globalization.
  • Identify periods of high levels of global integration as well as periods of low levels of integration.
  • Examine the potential impact of globalization and interdependence on such concepts as peace, domestic economic stability, and uneven development.
  • Examine the history of European integration and the development of the single market.
  • Describe the economic policies underlying European integration, including, but not limited to, the Common Agricultural Policy, Regional Development Funds, and the Euro.
  • IDENTIFY CURRENT EVENTS RELATED TO INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY. (SLO#9)
  • Describe current issues and problems in the international economy.

POLS 312 Politics of the Middle East

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Area Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to gain understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Area Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of the Middle East. It covers the region in biblical times, its history as part of the Ottoman Empire, its independence and inclusion in the Mandate system and its modern day existence through the twentieth century. The impact of religion, colonialism, the natural resource situation, socio-economics, ideology, conflict and resolution and foreign and domestic policies will be examined in the region on a country-by-country basis. The Palestinian Question, from both the Israeli and Palestinian perspectives will also be analyzed. The course includes an examination of dominant political institutions, actors, processes and belief systems within the context of political culture and history and an analysis of area political economy and foreign policy in the environment of global interdependence. Countries to be covered include Saudi Arabia, Iran, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon. The course concludes with a summation of the region as it stands today and an assessment of where it is likely to go in the near future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1 explain the origins, evolution and organization of area cultures and politics.
  • describe the factors that influence the development and organization of cultures and politics.
  • trace the impact of those factors by describing the major events in the history of the region.
  • compare and contrast the impact of those factors on specific aspects of the cultural and political development of the Middle East.
  • SLO 2 describe the dynamics of the area's political processes in the contexts of social and economic forces of globalization, regional integration and disintegration;
  • describe major forces of globalization and regional integration and disintegration.
  • assess the impact of these forces on specific political processes in the Middle East
  • SLO 3 compare and contrast theories and concepts utilized in the disciplined study of countries and regions.
  • SLO 4 synthesize and refine their process of thinking and communicating with regard to other cultures, nations and regions, enhancing critical analysis skills and independent action.
  • evaluate texts and other sources critically and be able to draw rational conclusions from that reading.
  • communicate effectivley about cultures, nations, and regions both verbally and in short and long written formats.
  • research information concerning the politics and cultures of the Middle East and produce a research paper based on this information.

POLS 313 Latin America

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Area Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to gain understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Area Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of Latin America. It covers the region in the pre-Columbian era, its history as part of the Spanish Empire, the independence movements of the nineteenth century and the modern day existence of each nation state in the area to the twenty-first century. The impact of religion, colonialism, the natural resource situation, socio-economics, ideology, conflict and resolution and foreign and domestic policies will be examined in the region on a country-by-country basis. The course includes an examination of dominant political institutions, actors, processes and belief systems within the context of political culture and history and an analysis of area political economy and foreign policy in the environment of global interdependence. Countries to be covered include but are not limited to Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Venezuela, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic. The course concludes with a summation of the region as it stands today and an assessment of where it is likely to go in the near future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1 Explain the origins, evolution and organization of area cultures and politics; ·describe the factors that influence the development and organization of cultures and politics; ·trace the impact of those factors by describing the major events in the history of the region; ·compare and contrast the impact of those factors on specific aspects of the cultural and political development of Latin America.
  • SLO 2 Describe the dynamics of the area's political processes in the contexts of social and economic forces of globalization, regional integration and disintegration; ·describe major forces of globalization and regional integration and disintegration. ·assess the impact of these forces on specific political processes in Latin America.
  • SLO 3 Compare and contrast theories and concepts utilized in the disciplined study of countries and regions.
  • SLO 4 Synthesize and refine their process of thinking and communicating with regard to other cultures, nations and regions, enhancing critical analysis skills and independent action; ·evaluate texts and other sources critically and be able to draw rational conclusions from that reading; ·communicate effectively about cultures, nations, and regions both verbally and in short and long written formats. ·research information concerning the politics and cultures of Latin America and produce a research paper based on this information.

POLS 314 Modern Europe and the Unification Process

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Area Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to gain understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Area Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of modern Europe and the trends, processes and issues surrounding unification.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1 explain the origins, evolution and organization of area cultures and politics.
  • describe the factors that influence the development and organization of cultures and politics.
  • trace the impact of those factors by describing the major events in the history of the region.
  • compare and contrast the impact of those factors on specific aspects of the cultural and political development of Europe.
  • SLO 2 describe the dynamics of the area's political processes in the contexts of social and economic forces of globalization, regional integration and disintegration;
  • describe major forces of globalization and regional integration and disintegration.
  • assess the impact of these forces on specific political processes in Europe.
  • SLO 3 compare and contrast theories and concepts utilized in the disciplined study of countries and regions.
  • SLO 4 synthesize and refine their process of thinking and communicating with regard to other cultures, nations and regions, enhancing critical analysis skills and independent action.
  • evaluate texts and other sources critically and be able to draw rational conclusions from that reading.
  • communicate effectiveley about cultures, nations, and regions both verbally and in short and long written formats.
  • research information concerning the politics and cultures of Europe and produce a research paper based on this information.

POLS 315 Pacific Rim

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Area Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to gain understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Area Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of the Pacific Rim and its trends, processes and issues.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1 explain the origins, evolution and organization of area cultures and politics.
  • describe the factors that influence the development and organization of cultures and politics.
  • trace the impact of those factors by describing the major events in the history of the region.
  • compare and contrast the impact of those factors on specific aspects of the cultural and political development of the Pacific Rim.
  • SLO 2 describe the dynamics of the area's political processes in the contexts of social and economic forces of globalization, regional integration and disintegration;
  • describe major forces of globalization and regional integration and disintegration.
  • assess the impact of these forces on specific political processes in the Pacific Rim.
  • SLO 3 compare and contrast theories and concepts utilized in the disciplined study of countries and regions.
  • SLO 4 synthesize and refine their process of thinking and communicating with regard to other cultures, nations and regions, enhancing critical analysis skills and independent action.
  • evaluate texts and other sources critically and be able to draw rational conclusions from that reading.
  • communicate effectively about cultures, nations, and regions both verbally and in short and long written formats.
  • research information concerning the politics and cultures of the Pacific Rim and produce a research paper based on this information.

POLS 317 Global Studies: Africa

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Global Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to gain understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Global Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of Africa. It covers the region's history, its independence movements and the modern day existence of nation states in the area to the twenty-first century. The impact of history, colonialism, the natural resource situation, socio-economics, ideology, conflict and resolution and foreign and domestic policies will be examined in the region on a country-by-country basis. The course includes an examination of dominant political institutions, actors, processes and belief systems within the context of political culture and history and an analysis of area political economy and foreign policy in the environment of global interdependence. The course concludes with a summation of the region as it stands today and an assessment of where it is likely to go in the near future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Explain the origins, evolution and organization of area cultures and politics.
  • Describe the factors that influence the development and organization of cultures and politics.
  • Trace the impact of those factors by describing the major events in the history of the region.
  • Compare and contrast the impact of those factors on specific aspects of the cultural and political development of Africa.
  • SLO #2: Describe the dynamics of the area's political processes in the contexts of social and economic forces of globalization, regional integration and disintegration.
  • Describe major forces of globalization and regional integration and disintegration.
  • Assess the impact of these forces on specific political processes in Africa.
  • SLO #3: Compare and contrast theories and concepts utilized in the disciplined study of countries and regions.
  • SLO #4: Synthesize and refine their process of thinking and communicating with regard to other cultures, nations and regions, enhancing critical analysis skills and independent action.
  • Evaluate texts and other sources critically and be able to draw rational conclusions from that reading.
  • Research information concerning the politics and cultures of Africa and produce a research paper based on this information.
  • Communicate effectively about cultures, nations, and regions both verbally and in short and long written formats.

POLS 318 Global Studies: Central Asia

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Global Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to gain understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Global Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of Central Asia. It covers the region's history, its natural resource situation, socio-economics, ideology, conflict and resolution and foreign and domestic policies on a country-by-country basis. The course includes an examination of dominant political institutions, actors, processes and belief systems within the context of political culture and history and an analysis of area political economy and foreign policy in the environment of global interdependence. The course concludes with a summation of the region as it stands today and an assessment of where it is likely to go in the near future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Explain the origins, evolution and organization of area cultures and politics.
  • Describe the factors that influence the development and organization of cultures and politics.
  • Trace the impact of those factors by describing the major events in the history of the region.
  • Compare and contrast the impact of those factors on specific aspects of the cultural and political development of Central Asia.
  • SLO #2: Describe the dynamics of the area's political processes in the contexts of social and economic forces of globalization, regional integration and disintegration.
  • Describe major forces of globalization and regional integration and disintegration.
  • Assess the impact of these forces on specific political processes in Central Asia.
  • SLO #3: Compare and contrast theories and concepts utilized in the disciplined study of countries and regions.
  • SLO #4: Synthesize and refine their process of thinking and communicating with regard to other cultures, nations and regions, enhancing critical analysis skills and independent action.
  • Evaluate texts and other sources critically and be able to draw rational conclusions from that reading.
  • Research information concerning the politics and cultures of Central Asia and produce a research paper based on this information.
  • Communicate effectively about cultures, nations, and regions both verbally and in short and long written formats.

POLS 319 Global Studies: Southeast Asia

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Global Studies courses cover the government and politics of selected nations within a distinct geopolitical area of the world in order to gain understanding of the institutions and dynamics of the area. This Global Studies survey course is designed to give students an understanding of Southeast Asia. It covers the region's history, its natural resource situation, socio-economics, ideology, conflict and resolution and foreign and domestic policies on a country-by-country basis. The course includes an examination of dominant political institutions, actors, processes and belief systems within the context of political culture and history and an analysis of area political economy and foreign policy in the environment of global interdependence. The course concludes with a summation of the region as it stands today and an assessment of where it is likely to go in the near future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Explain the origins, evolution and organization of area cultures and politics.
  • Describe the factors that influence the development and organization of cultures and politics.
  • Trace the impact of those factors by describing the major events in the history of the region.
  • Compare and contrast the impact of those factors on specific aspects of the cultural and political development of Southeast Asia.
  • SLO #2: Describe the dynamics of the area's political processes in the contexts of social and economic forces of globalization, regional integration and disintegration.
  • Describe major forces of globalization and regional integration and disintegration.
  • Assess the impact of these forces on specific political processes in Southeast Asia.
  • SLO #3: Compare and contrast theories and concepts utilized in the disciplined study of countries and regions.
  • SLO #4: Synthesize and refine their process of thinking and communicating with regard to other cultures, nations and regions, enhancing critical analysis skills and independent action.
  • Evaluate texts and other sources critically and be able to draw rational conclusions from that reading.
  • Research information concerning the politics and cultures of Southeast Asia and produce a research paper based on this information.
  • Communicate effectively about cultures, nations, and regions both verbally and in short and long written formats.

POLS 320 Introduction to Political Theory

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • C-ID:C-ID POLS 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

In this course, students will examine theoretical approaches to politics and ways of thinking about politics, covering important thinkers and topics during the ancient, medieval, and modern periods.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: demonstrate an understanding of the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian origins of the Western political thought.
  • explain the development of a particular category of thought in its own historical context.
  • recognize the life and times of various political thinkers.
  • SLO 2: describe the logical coherence of a particular category of thought through different historical periods.
  • verify thought empirically, testing the philosophical underpinning of a particular thought through observation.
  • distinguish continuity from changes in the respective transitions from classic to medieval, to modern and to postmodern periods.
  • compare the predominant thought with alternative thoughts in a particular period of time.
  • evaluate significant historical events that give birth to the fundamental assumptions of a political thought.
  • SLO 3: integrate thought with practice, using thought as guidance to critically analyze current affairs.
  • SLO 4: determine which political thought offers more promise, best responds to particular challenges, and best meets the needs of the people.

POLS 324 Revolutions & Ideologies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course seeks to study ideologies and revolutions. Revolutions herald change in political systems. They can be based on ideologies or economic, religious or other differences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Understand the potential causes of revolutions.
  • Identify causes in society that can lead to a revolution.
  • SLO #2: Explain the theories underpinning a revolutionary movement.
  • SLO #3: Report on the course of a revolution.
  • SLO #4: Explain the consequences of revolutions on established institutions.
  • SLO #5: Evaluate the potential for and explain the consequences of a counter-revolution.

POLS 380 Introduction to Research Design and Methodology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:POLS 301, 302, or 310 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID POLS 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to introduce students to the political science research process. The course will address research design, quantitative and qualitative analysis and contemporary methodologies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • UNDERSTAND THE PROCESS AND STAGES OF POLITICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH. (SLO 1)
  • Describe the role of theoretical models in research.
  • Properly apply deductive reasoning models such as game theory.
  • Explain the relationship between observation and the inductive development of theoretical models
  • Evaluate causal relationships and testable hypotheses.
  • PERFORM STATISTICAL TESTS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS, TABULAR ANALYSIS, BI-VARIATE AND MULTI-VARIATE REGRESSION. (SLO 2)
  • Analyze statistical tests, including but not limited to descriptive statistics, tabular analysis, bi-variate and multi-variate regression.
  • Use statistical software programs to perform statistical tests.
  • EVALUATE OVERALL RESEARCH FINDINGS ON THE COMBINED BASIS OF ITS RESEARCH DESIGN, DATA COLLECTION, VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY. (SLO 3)
  • Evaluate a research design on the basis of its methodology
  • Appraise a data set on the basis of its collection practices.
  • Estimate the validity and reliability of research based on its methodology.
  • Apply knowledge of the research process to the evaluation of political science research and news reports.

POLS 382 Statistics for Social Science

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 120 or 125 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses upon the concepts and applications of descriptive and inferential statistics in political science and other social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, correlation and regression, chi-square, t-tests, and analysis of variance procedures. This course will analyze and interpret social science data sets using both hand computation and statistical software.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: ORGANIZE AND ANALYZE DATA.
  • Organize raw data into tables, frequency distributions, charts, and graphs.
  • Differentiate between discrete and continuous variables.
  • Identify different kinds of measurement including nominal, ordinal, interval,and ratio measures.
  • SLO 2: CALCULATE AND ANALYZE DATA USING DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS.
  • Calculate simple statistics such as frequencies and percentages, and measures of central tendency such as mean, median, and mode.
  • Describe the variability of a data set using concepts such as range, variance, and standard deviation.
  • SLO 3: DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE PRINCIPLES OF PROBABILITY AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING.
  • Understand the role of the Central Limit Theorem. distributions.
  • Construct and interpret confidence intervals.
  • Apply the principles of probability using probability distributions including Z scores, student t distributions, and Chi-Square distributions.
  • Differentiate between one and two tailed tests.
  • Determine and interpret levels of statistical significance.
  • Distinguish the difference between Type I and Type II errors.
  • SLO 4: ANALYZE BIVARIATE AND MULTIVARIATE RELATIONSHIPS USING REGRESSION.
  • Estimate relationships using Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression techniques.
  • Test for statistical significance using ANOVA and F tests.
  • Identify and test for known violations of OLS regression in data analysis, including multi-collinearity and non-linearity.
  • SLO 5: DEMONSTRATE MATHEMATICAL COMPETENCY AND THE APPLICATION OF QUANTITATIVE REASONING.
  • Calculate simple statistics such as frequencies, percentages, standard deviations, and variance by hand.
  • Calculate more sophisticated statistical estimations, such as regression, using statistical software such as SPSS.
  • SLO 6: UNDERSTAND THE SPECIFIC CHALLENGES AND LIMITATIONS OF USING STATISTICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH.
  • Understand concepts including but not limited to ecological fallacies, groups and subgroups,and varying units of analysis.

POLS 481 Introduction to Government: United States - Honors

  • Same As:HONOR 367
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a)
  • C-ID:C-ID POLS 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course analyzes the U.S. government's historic origins, philosophical and theoretical justification, constitutional structures and how these institutions work. It examines and describes the procedural aspects of the political system including holding elections, campaigning, voting, lobbying, legislating, executing and adjudicating law. It provides an analysis of contemporary problems and issues. It also describes California state and local governments' constitutional base, structures and functions, political process, problems and issues. Conducted in a seminar format, this course emphasizes participatory classroom styles of learning and the material used is more substantial and sophisticated. In addition, there are extensive research projects on American institutions, political processes, and political behavior designed to challenge and motivate. This course is not open to students who have completed POLS 301.
Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN THE STUDY OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS.
  • Define and compare key terms used in the study of the American system.
  • Examine and explain the conditions and values necessary for political democracy to exist.
  • Identify and evaluate institutions and political processes within the United States and California.
  • SLO 2: ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY AND CRITICAL THINKING BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY IN AMERICAN DEMOCRACY.
  • Analyze complex readings and processes.
  • Illustrate and appraise the relationship between national, state, and local governments and evaluate the effectiveness of the federal system.
  • Discuss and analyze contemporary political issues and operations in the United States and California.
  • SLO 3: RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF DECISIONS AND ACTIONS.
  • Analyze and apply effective tools of citizen participation.
  • SLO 4: ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF THE VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN POLITICAL SCIENCE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE'S OWN LIFE.
  • Evaluate and explain how the American system affects the student's life in terms of freedoms, restraints, and public policy.
  • SLO 5: EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES
  • Express ideas competently, using appropriate grammar, in a variety of written formats.

POLS 495 Independent Studies in Political Science

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.