Honors

Honors (HONOR)

HONOR 340 Honors Seminar: Political Campaign Communication

  • Same As:COMM 480
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the Cosumnes River College Catalog.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4G
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

What do pundits, politicians and the public have in common? The ability to impact political campaign communication. This seminar-style course will introduce students to the effects of political campaign communication on public opinion and election results. Using timely data, students will evaluate news media, debate presidential debates,
and analyze campaign messages using qualitative and quantitative approaches. This course is intended for the honors student interested in learning about political communication, rhetorical criticism, and techniques for writing for academic audiences. Enrollment is limited to
Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as COMM 480, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN A DISCIPLINE OF STUDY AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS (SLO #2; College Wide SLO Area 3). This includes the ability to:
  • Contrast historical campaign communication with contemporary examples.
  • Distinguish between quantitative and qualitative theoretical approaches in research of political communication.
  • Analyze the critical process by differentiating between "maxims" that guide critical invention.
  • Compare and contrast different rhetorical approaches. Analyze contemporary pieces of rhetorical criticism and consider applications for current political messages.
  • Analyze reasoning processes to evaluate issues, value judgments or conclusions that determine the quality, validity, and/or reliability of information.
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts.
  • Explain the importance of the study of political campaign communication in the broader picture of society.
  • ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY (SLO #3, College Wide SLO – Area 4). This includes the ability to:
  • Apply information and resources necessary to develop academically and personally.
  • Utilize skills from one’s “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc.
  • RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF DECISIONS AND ACTIONS (SLO #4, College Wide SLO – Area 5). This includes the ability to:
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in ethical reasoning necessary to exercise responsibility as an ethical individual, professional, local and global citizen.
  • ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF A VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN A DISCIPLINE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE’S OWN LIFE (SLO #5, College Wide SLO – Area 2). This includes the ability to:
  • Collect and critically evaluate media messages. Focusing on news mediums (e.g. television, radio, newspapers, the Internet), assess the role of the media and its impact on campaign communication.
  • Contrast and assess the effectiveness of candidate messages. Construct rhetorical visions expressed in the campaign communication of presidential (and possibly other) candidates.
  • Debate the presidential debates. Analyze the presidential candidates' positions on political issues and performance effectiveness.
  • Assess voter reaction to the political debates and other forms of campaign communication. Select common themes communicated in focus groups research as a way to interpret public opinion.
  • Design and construct a critical paper evaluating some aspect of political campaign communication.
  • Consider the implications of writing for an academic audience.

HONOR 341 Honors Seminar: Persuasion within Social Issues

  • Same As:COMM 482
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300, ENGWR 480, or HONOR 375 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This seminar-style course will introduce students to the fundamental theories and techniques of persuasion as they occur in various communication contexts, including commercial, interpersonal, public and mass media. A series of writing assignments will focus on the skills of critical thinking, persuasion, and the sophistication of argumentative essay skills. Essays of advanced composition shall be evaluated for their quality in both critical thinking and composition. The writing assignments will apply theoretical models of critical thinking and communication studies to rhetoric, examining message production, analyzing messages, and exploring the fields of electronic and print media, advertising (product campaign), political campaign strategy, and ideological campaign techniques for mass communication. Students explore ethical considerations of persuasive communication, learn about types of reasoning, and identify fallacious arguments as they occur in persuasion. Students will focus on the design and organization of persuasive messages within a speech format for an individual or group presentations for a live audience. This course offers honors students the opportunity to study, critique, discuss and present advanced topics to focus on the impact of persuasive attempts within ethical, social and political issues. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. As COMM 315, Persuasion, has a similar basis as this Honors course, this course is not open to a student that has received credit for COMM 315, Persuasion. This course is the same as COMM 482 and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • COMPOSE IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1).
  • Use advanced lower-division composition techniques that address essay structure, continuity, emphasis and subtlety, elements of style, grammar as stylistic technique, audience, and persuasive essay writing.
  • Apply the advanced use of clarity (agent-action-goal) and coherence (concentration, focus, maintenance, clear orientation and subject control), concision and emphasis to develop writing skills appropriate for a sophisticated style of English.
  • Compose arguments cogently in a number of modes, including but not limited to making proposals, providing evaluation, and explanation of positions and the existence of causal and/or correlation relationships.
  • Design and organize persuasive messages within a speech format for an individual or group presentations for a live audience.
  • ANALYZE AND FORMULATE CRITICAL THINKING WITHIN THE EVIDENCE AND REASONING OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #2).
  • Identify, review, and utilize methods of persuasion for messages designed within a specific content issue or arena, such as a series of public service announcements for a social issue (such as anti-drug messages, or environmental green issues, or human civil rights, etc.), and/or political campaign or public office speeches, and other website or multimedia presentations.
  • Understand the nature of critical thinking and quality composition.
  • Apply the theoretical foundations for argument analysis, persuasion and essay construction of induction, deduction, analysis, synthesis, sound reasoning, and fallacy identification within the readings and writing of persuasive communication messages.
  • Analyze and respond to competing points of views to determine the stances of the authors on the subjects as well to express individual stances logically and effectively.
  • ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE'S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #3).
  • Employ critical thinking and writing skills in reflection about multi-cultural diversity issues, ethics, and politics in terms of the effectiveness and appropriateness of persuasive communication.
  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF COMMUNICATION STUDIES (SLO #4).
  • Analyze persuasive messages, including identifying and explaining the persuasive components or strategies used to effect change.
  • Identify persuasive strategies and their theoretical foundations as they exist in a variety of communication contexts (e.g., interpersonal compliance-gaining, commercial advertising, political rhetoric and campaigning, public speaking, mass media, etc.).
  • Differentiate between humanistic and social science approaches to persuasion.
  • Determine and evaluate criteria for the development of successful persuasive campaigns, focusing on a specific set of message designs in a specified content, such as a series of public service announcements in multimedia presentation, website information, published and/or transcribed speeches, and/or publication of printed materials.
  • Define and identify various theoretical perspectives across the discipline of Communication Studies within written and verbal messages prepared to present analysis of persuasive techniques and strategies to the other students participating in an Honors seminar-style format.

HONOR 350 Honors Seminar: Introduction to Critical Theory

  • Same As:FMS 488
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course investigates questions of interpretation and representation in film, literature, media, and culture. Students examine contemporary critical and cultural theory, then apply these theories in analyzing a variety of texts from the Shakespearean play to the science fiction horror film. Theories introduced include, but are not limited
to, semiotics, psychoanalysis, rhetorical criticism, gender theory,and postmodernism. Students intending to transfer into arts, film, literature, humanities, and cultural studies programs will find this course particularly useful in understanding the critical language of the university. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details
about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as FMS 488, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN A DISCIPLINE OF STUDY AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS (SLO #2; College Wide SLO Area 3). This includes the ability to:
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts.
  • ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY (SLO #3, College Wide SLO – Area 4). This includes the ability to:
  • Apply information and resources necessary to develop academically and personally.
  • Utilize skills from one’s “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc.
  • RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF DECISIONS AND ACTIONS (SLO #4, College Wide SLO – Area 5). This includes the ability to:
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in ethical reasoning necessary to exercise responsibility as an ethical individual, professional, local and global citizen.
  • ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF A VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN A DISCIPLINE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE’S OWN LIFE (SLO #5, College Wide SLO – Area 2). This includes the ability to:
  • Understand, evaluate, and apply critical theory, theory's relationship to art and culture, its role in interpreting literary and visual arts, and examining ideology and representations of gender and ethnicity.
  • Apply current theory to the analysis and criticism of film, literature, and media.
  • Understand, evaluate and apply the basic concepts of semiotics, post-structuralism, psychoanalysis, gender theory, and postmodernism and their relationship to/influence on art and politics.

HONOR 352 Honors Seminar: The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

  • Same As:FMS 489
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This seminar studies the work of Alfred Hitchcock from the perspective of the key concepts in film theory. Students will investigate the films and criticism of one of the greatest and strangest directors, the self-styled master of suspense. This seminar takes a close reading of Hitchcock’s
most important films and the most significant writing on the director’s work. For students interested in film, media, art, literature, and the humanities, the course examines Hitchcock’s visual style, thematic concerns, and directorial techniques, and introduces the major critical
approaches to cinema studies. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as FMS 489, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN A DISCIPLINE OF STUDY AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS (SLO #2; College Wide SLO Area 3). This includes the ability to:
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts.
  • ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY (SLO #3, College Wide SLO – Area 4). This includes the ability to:
  • Apply information and resources necessary to develop academically and personally.
  • Utilize skills from one’s “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc.
  • ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF A VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN A DISCIPLINE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE’S OWN LIFE (SLO #4, College Wide SLO – Area 2). This includes the ability to:
  • Identify the stylistic, narrative, and thematic concerns in the director's work.
  • Understand Hitchcock's contribution to the cinematic language (pure cinema, point of view, montage, mise-en-scene) and genre (the melodrama and the thriller).
  • Read, understand, evaluate, and compare the key critical appraisals of the director by Modelski, Wood, Spoto, Truffaut and others.
  • Apply critical theory (auteur, feminist, psychoanalytic, semiotic) in the analysis of the films and their cultural implications.
  • Participate in the seminar mode of learning, including seminar discussion and presentation of a creative and original paper of critical value to the study of Hitchcock.

HONOR 364 Honors Seminar: Philosophy of the Martial Arts

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an introduction to the philosophical views that have traditionally been associated with the practice of martial arts and explores the interplay between those views and that practice. It also provides an introduction to those contemporary philosophical issues that arise in the context of present day analytic philosophical reflection on the nature and practice of martial arts. The course thus provides both the opportunity to appreciate the eastern philosophical underpinnings of an activity that has become part of mainstream American Culture and the opportunity to experience the rigorous
application of contemporary analytic academic philosophical
methodology. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Employ the general and transferable critical thinking and communication abilities developed by the rigorous study of academic philosophy (SLO 1).
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in upper-division work in the discipline of Philosophy.
  • Apply the basic methodology of contemporary analytic philosophy (e.g. assess, critique, deduce, evaluate, research, support, justify, analyze, debate, defend, detect, distinguish, examine, etc.) to understand traditional Asian, as well as contemporary American, martial arts.
  • Recognize and explain the fundamental ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological tenets of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism (SLO 2).
  • Describe and explain the influence of the fundamental ethical, metaphysical, and epistemological tenets of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism on the traditional study of (Asian) martial arts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to navigate a seminar environment (SLO 3).

HONOR 366 Recent United States History - Honors

  • Same As:HIST 485
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to students that are eligible for the Cosumnes River College Honors Program.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the study of American history from 1945 to the present day. It is an honors course that uses an intensive instructional methodology designed to challenge motivated students and cultivate advanced critical thinking skills. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role played by complex interrelationships of political, economic, social, and cultural forces in United States history after World War II, and the role played by multiple ethnic groups as well. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 314. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as HIST 485 and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • ANALYZE REASONING PROCESSES TO EVALUATE ISSUES, VALUE JUDGMENTS, OR CONCLUSIONS THAT DETERMINE THE QUALITY, VALIDITY, AND /OR RELIABILITY OF INFORMATION (SLO #1).
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts through written assignments.
  • Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of a major discipline of study through oral presentations and class discussions.
  • Explain the importance of historical consciousness of the major discipline of study in understanding the broader picture of society through a final project.
  • APPLY COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AS SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS (SLO #2).
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information in the form of primary documents.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF HISTORY THROUGH READING PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES (SLO #3).
  • Generate significant open-ended questions about United States history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments and perspectives that inform one’s own life.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between United States history and global history to foster active citizenship as well as applying historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues.
  • Identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history since 1945.
  • Evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances.

HONOR 367 Introduction to Government: United States – Honors

  • Same As:POLS 481
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a)
  • C-ID:C-ID POLS 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course analyzes the U.S. government's historic origins, philosophical and theoretical justification, constitutional structures and how these institutions work. It examines and describes the procedural aspects of the political system including holding elections, campaigning, voting, lobbying, legislating, executing and adjudicating law. It provides an analysis of contemporary problems and issues. It also describes California state and local governments' constitutional base, structures and functions, political process, problems and issues. Conducted in a seminar format, this course emphasizes participatory classroom styles of learning and the material used is more substantial and sophisticated. In addition, there are extensive research projects on American institutions, political processes, and political behavior designed to challenge and motivate. This course is not open to students who have completed POLS 301.
Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN THE STUDY OF AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS.
  • Define and compare key terms used in the study of the American system.
  • Examine and explain the conditions and values necessary for political democracy to exist.
  • Identify and evaluate institutions and political processes within the United States and California.
  • SLO 2: ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY AND CRITICAL THINKING BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY IN AMERICAN DEMOCRACY.
  • Analyze complex readings and processes.
  • Illustrate and appraise the relationship between national, state, and local governments and evaluate the effectiveness of the federal system.
  • Discuss and analyze contemporary political issues and operations in the United States and California.
  • SLO 3: RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF DECISIONS AND ACTIONS.
  • Analyze and apply effective tools of citizen participation.
  • SLO 4: ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF THE VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN POLITICAL SCIENCE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE'S OWN LIFE.
  • Evaluate and explain how the American system affects the student's life in terms of freedoms, restraints, and public policy.
  • SLO 5: EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES
  • Express ideas competently, using appropriate grammar, in a variety of written formats.

HONOR 375 Honors College Composition

  • Same As:ENGWR 480
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process. Students must also be eligible for admission to the Honors Program.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A2; IGETC Area 1A
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers the honors student a challenging course that will develop skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing. It asks students to critically analyze, compare, and evaluate various complex works. The course is designed to help students demonstrate, in both argumentative and expository prose, complex critical thinking, effective organization, precise diction, and sophisticated style; at least one of those essays requires research and appropriate MLA documentation. Essays written during the term will total at least 8,000 words. Throughout the course, fluency and correctness are emphasized. This course is not open to students who have successfully passed ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340. This course is the same as ENGWR 480. This course, under either name, may be taken one time for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • COMPOSE CAREFULLY REASONED AND STYLISTICALLY SOPHISTICATED COLLEGE-LEVEL ESSAYS USING A VARIETY OF RHETORICAL STRATEGIES AND APPLYING APPROPRIATE CITATIONS AND FORMATTING STANDARDS (SLO #1; Engl. Prog.SLO #1; Honors Prog.SLO # 1 and #5).
  • Use pre-writing, drafting, revision, and editing/proofreading to create essays.
  • Write focused, thoughtful thesis statements.
  • Support opinions in writing through careful, critical thinking.
  • Compose stylistically sophisticated essays using a variety of approaches, such as comparison/contrast, classification, definition, narration, description, causal analysis.
  • Construct a carefully reasoned argument in writing that considers audience and opposition.
  • Build coherence and unity in writing at three levels: sentence, paragraph, and essay.
  • Organize written texts logically and creatively without dependence on formulaic prescriptions.
  • APPLY COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS BY DEFINING ISSUES AS WELL AS RESEARCHING, EVALUATING, AND SYNTHESIZING SOURCES TO SUPPORT A THESIS (SLO #2; Engl Prog. SLO #2 and Engl. Prog. SLO #3; Honors Prog. SLO # 3 and #4).
  • Appraise and use a variety of research techniques.
  • Evaluate sources.
  • Research and incorporate sources effectively and meaningfully in writing.
  • Summarize, paraphrase, and directly quote outside sources as support for his or her ideas and/or represent a belief held by the opposition.
  • Use MLA documentation format correctly.
  • CRITICALLY ANALYZE, COMPARE, AND EVALUATE VARIOUS COMPLEX WORKS (SLO #3; Engl. Prog. SLO#4; Honors Prog. SLO #2 and #5).
  • Annotate and analyze complex written texts and respond thoughtfully to them.
  • Analyze and evaluate the 3-fold rhetorical concerns of audience, writer, and message in written texts.
  • Question an author's claim and support.
  • Critique his or her own and other student writing.
  • APPLY THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH EMPLOYING A VARIETY OF SENTENCE STRUCTURES AND COLLEGE-LEVEL DICTION (SLO #4; Engl. Prog. SLO #5; Honors Prog. SLO #1).
  • Use clear and varied sentences to demonstrate overall mastery of the conventions of standard written English.
  • Analyze his or her own and other student style and diction.

HONOR 378 Honors - Literature Adapted into Film

  • Same As:ENGLT 488
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the Cosumnes River College Catalog.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3A; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course analyzes the process, challenges, failures, and successes of adapting literary and stage material into film. It compares faithful and unfaithful adaptations through reading the original texts and viewing the adapted films with an awareness of their historical and cultural contexts. The course examines intention, creative distinctions, as well as limits and strengths of each medium. This course requires at least one research essay proposing and justifying details for an adaptation and including appropriate MLA documentation. This course is the same as ENGLT 488. This course, under either name, may be taken one time for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • CRITICALLY ANALYZE, COMPARE, AND EVALUATE VARIOUS WORKS OF LITERATURE AND FILM (SLO#1; PSLO #4 and #1; Honors Prog. SLO #2 and #5). Outcome may be evaluated by all or some of the following criteria:
  • Annotate and analyze written texts and respond thoughtfully to them.
  • Analyze and summarize films and respond thoughtfully to them
  • Determine themes, plot structure, characters, and symbols used in written works and films.
  • Question a director’s intention and effectiveness of the director’s choices.
  • Compare and contrast elements of adaptations (such as theme for example) to the corresponding elements in the original texts.
  • Construct criteria for judging strengths and weaknesses of adaptations.
  • Appraise the successes and failures of adaptations.
  • Assess the effects of historical and/or social context for each work studied.
  • Critique his or her own and other student writing.
  • APPLY COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AS SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS (SLO#2; PSLO #2 and #3; Honors Prog. SLO #2 and #5). Outcome may be evaluated by all or some of the following criteria:
  • Demonstrate awareness of the effects of literature on the reader through textual analysis, classroom discussion, and response papers.
  • Apply terminology from literary studies.
  • Analyze and interpret elements of literature.
  • Appraise the strengths and weaknesses inherent in the genres of fiction, non-fiction, and drama.
  • Evaluate literary texts in cultural context, as cultural and artistic expressions in their historical and social background.
  • Compose interpretive essays based on the literature.
  • Propose his or her own plan of adapting a literary work into film and justify the choices made in this proposal.
  • ANALYZE, CRITIQUE, AND EXPRESS IDEAS EFFECTIVELY AS SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE VIEWERS OF FILMS BY APPLYING COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (SLO#3; PSLO #2 and #4; Honors Prog. SLO #2 and #5). Outcome may be evaluated by all or some of the following criteria:
  • Apply terminology from film studies and critical theories.
  • Analyze and the interpret elements of film.
  • Appraise the strengths and weaknesses inherent in the genres of film
  • Evaluate films based on concepts such as narrative modes, genre conventions, and production exigencies.
  • Evaluate films in cultural context, as cultural and artistic expressions in their historical and social background.
  • Compose interpretive essays based on the literature.
  • ASSESS ISSUES AS WELL AS RESEARCH, EVALUATE, AND SYNTHESIZE SOURCES TO SUPPORT A THESIS BY APPLYING COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (SLO#4; PSLO #2, #3 and #5; Honors Prog. SLO # 3 and #4). Outcome may be evaluated by all or some of the following criteria:
  • Evaluate and justify his or her own choices made in a proposed adaptation of a literary work.
  • Integrate details from research to support his or her own choices made in the proposed adaptation.
  • Appraise and use a variety of research techniques.
  • Evaluate sources.
  • Research and incorporate sources effectively and meaningfully in writing.
  • Summarize, paraphrase, and directly quote outside sources as support for his or her ideas and/or represent a belief held by the opposition.
  • Use MLA documentation format correctly.

HONOR 385 Honors Seminar in Genetics

  • Same As:BIOL 485
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers honors students the opportunity to study, critique, and discuss advanced topics in genetics such as genetically modified foods, whole-genome rapid sequencing, gene therapies for human disease, and a variety of reproductive technologies. Furthermore, this course includes the study of Mendelian inheritance, the roles of chromosomes and genes in human disease, how genes direct development, the relationship between genes, environment and behavior, and the contribution of genes to human diversity. Students will engage with each other to discuss ethical, legal and social issues during class discussions, and analyze scientific literature in written reports. Enrollment is limited to Honors students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as BIOL 485. This course, under either name, may be taken a total of one time for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: SOLVE GENETICS PROBLEMS BY APPLYING PRINCIPLES OF INHERITANCE.
  • Solve genetics problems by applying Mendelian principles to single and two gene problems with and without dominance.
  • Solve genetics problems involving sex linkage.
  • SLO 2: INTEGRATE MOLECULAR GENETICS AND CELL BIOLOGY TO EXPLAIN THE BASIS OF HUMAN GENETIC TRAITS.
  • Relate the functions of cellular organelles to specific human genetic disorders.
  • Describe the structure and functions of DNA, RNA and proteins.
  • Relate DNA, RNA and proteins to the development of human characteristics.
  • Examine the interaction between genes and the environment.
  • Use relevant genetic concepts to assess the contribution of genetic variation and environmental variation to variation in human phenotypes.
  • SLO 3: RECOGNIZE THE IMPORTANCE OF GENE THERAPY, GENETIC ENGINEERING, AND BIOTECHNOLOGY ON HUMAN HEALTH.
  • Describe the role of genes in human diseases (like cancer).
  • Communicate how advances in recombinant DNA technology and biotechnology (e.g. gene therapy and genetic engineering) can be used to treat genetic diseases in humans, and modify other organisms for human use.
  • Understand how modern DNA sequencing and genome databases are being used to change medical practices and better human health.
  • SLO 4: GATHER RELEVANT INFORMATION AND USE IT TO EVALUATE THE SCIENTIFIC VALIDITY OF INFORMATION PRESENTED BY THE MEDIA AND OTHER SOURCES.
  • Distinguish between scientific hypotheses, inferences, and speculation.
  • Identify and analyze the scientific basis of modern genetic technologies.
  • Review current scientific literature, and evaluate the effectiveness of the research.
  • Present written and/or oral reports which address background information, procedures, results, and interpretation of data from scientific literature.
  • Examine current ethical and social issues in human genetics.

HONOR 391 Honors Seminar in Mathematics - Introduction to Mathematical Proof

  • Same As:MATH 483
  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 370 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Honors Seminars in Mathematics are special one-unit intensive courses for academically accomplished students or those with the potential for high academic achievement. This particular course will study various methods of mathematical proof in a seminar setting, and will be particularly useful to students planning to study calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. Topics include: deductive reasoning, proof by axioms, proofs of conditional and biconditional statements, proofs by contrapositive and contradiction, and proof by mathematical induction. Studies will include homework, discussions, oral presentations and lectures. Students will be expected to do independent problem solving and present their solutions to the class. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students (see catalog). This course is the same as MATH 483. This course, under either name, may be taken one time for credit. This course will be offered in spring semester only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: EXAMINE METHODS OF PROOF
  • Prove statements using axioms
  • Prove statements using deductive reasoning
  • Prove conditional statements
  • Prove biconditional statements
  • Prove statements using the contrapositive
  • Prove statements using contradiction
  • Prove statements using mathematical induction

HONOR 392 Honors Seminar in Mathematics - Topics in Number Theory

  • Same As:MATH 484
  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 370 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Honors Seminars in Mathematics are special one-unit intensive courses for academically accomplished students or those with the potential for high academic achievement. This particular course will study various topics in the field of number theory in a seminar setting. Topics include: the integers and their properties; finding integer solutions to Diophantine equations (equations with more variables than equations); and cryptography (the study of how secret codes are created and broken). Studies will include homework, discussions, oral presentations and lectures. Students will be expected to do independent problem solving and present their solutions to the class. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students (see catalog). This course is the same as Math 484. This course, under either name, may be taken one time for credit. This course will be offered in spring semester only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: EXAMINE THE PROPERTIES OF THE INTEGERS
  • Examine divisibility
  • Examine prime numbers
  • Calculate the greatest common divisor
  • Examine the fundamental theorem of arithmetic
  • Prove theorems involving the integers
  • SLO 2: EXAMINE DIOPHANTINE EQUATIONS
  • Examine the Euclidean algorithm
  • Solve linear Diophantine equations
  • Prove theorems involving Diophantine equations
  • SLO 3: EXAMINE LINEAR CONGRUENCES
  • Examine modular arithmetic
  • Examine the properties of congruences
  • Solve congruence equations
  • Prove theorems involving linear congruences
  • SLO 4: EXAMINE CRYPTOLOGY
  • Examine the theory of cryptology
  • Examine encoding messages
  • Examine decoding messages
  • Prove theorems involving cryptology

HONOR 393 Introduction to Probability and Statistics - Honors

  • Same As:STAT 480
  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 120 or 125 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the Cosumnes River College Catalog.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to probability and statistics designed for students in the honors program. Topics include elementary principles and applications of descriptive statistics, counting principles, elementary probability principles, probability distributions, estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation, and ANOVA. Scientific calculators with two-variable statistical capabilities may be required for this class. This honors section uses an intensive instructional methodology designed to challenge motivated students. This course is the same as STAT 480 and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: ORGANIZE, DISPLAY, DESCRIBE AND COMPARE REAL DATA SETS.
  • Recognize data types and data sources: develop basic statistical terminology including population parameters & sample statistics; identify common sampling methods used for obtaining data and identify advantages & disadvantages of each; recognize bias in sampling; compare principles of good experimental design
  • Organize and display data appropriately by preparing tables and graphs.
  • Analyze data by computing measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, and measures of position.
  • Analyze bivariate data for linear trends using the least-squares regression model and the correlation coefficient.
  • SLO 2: DISTINGUISH BETWEEN PROBABILITY MODELS APPROPRIATE TO DIFFERENT CHANCE EVENTS AND CALCULATE PROBABILITY ACCORDING TO THESE METHODS
  • Compute probabilities using sample spaces, the addition & multiplication rules, conditional probability, and complements.
  • Develop and apply probability distributions for discrete random variables; compute probabilities and expected value.
  • Analyze both discrete and continuous probability distributions by considering areas under the graph of a function or a histogram.
  • Use the normal and binomial probability distributions to compute probabilities.
  • Develop and apply sampling distributions for the sample mean and sample proportion.
  • SLO 3: APPLY INFERENTIAL STATISTICAL METHODS TO MAKE PREDICTIONS, DRAW CONCLUSIONS ABOUT HYPOTHESES AND COMPARE POPULATIONS.
  • Create and interpret confidence interval estimates for population mean and population proportion based on appropriate probability models.
  • Select the appropriate hypothesis test, perform the necessary computations and comparisons to test hypotheses about on one population mean or one population proportion and explain the conclusion of the test.
  • Create and interpret confidence interval estimates for the difference in two population means (independent and dependent sampling) or two population proportions.
  • Select the appropriate hypothesis test, perform the necessary computations and comparisons to test hypotheses about two-population means (independent & dependent sampling), more than two population means (ANOVA), and two or more population proportions (Chi-Sq. tests) and explain the conclusion of the test.
  • Test significance of correlation and make predictions based on linear trends using the least-squares regression model.
  • SLO 4: USE TECHNOLOGY TO PERFORM STATISTICAL COMPUTATIONS, PREDICTIONS AND HYPOTHESIS TESTS.education. psychology, life science, health science and education.
  • SLO 5: USE APPROPRIATE STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES TO ANALYZE AND INTERPRET APPLICATIONS OF DATA including all of the following: business, economics, social sciences, psychology, life science, health science and education.
  • SLO 6 (HONORS PROGRAM SLO 1): EXPRESSION OF IDEAS: EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition).
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • SLO 7 (HONORS PROGRAM SLO 2): ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING: UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN A DISCIPLINE OF STUDY AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS (SLO #2; College Wide SLO Area 3).
  • Analyze reasoning processes to evaluate issues, value judgments or conclusions that determine the quality, validity, and/or reliability of information.
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts.
  • Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of a major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO 8 (HONORS PROGRAM SLO 3): INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY: ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY (SLO #3, College Wide SLO – Area 4).
  • Apply information and resources necessary to develop academically and personally.
  • Utilize skills from one’s “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc.
  • SLO 9 (HONORS PROGRAM SLO 4): ETHICAL REASONING: RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF DECISIONS AND ACTIONS (SLO #4, College Wide SLO – Area 5).
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in ethical reasoning necessary to exercise responsibility as an ethical individual, professional, local and global citizen.
  • SLO 10 (HONORS PROGRAM SLO 5): ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF A VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN A DISCIPLINE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE’S OWN LIFE (SLO #5, College Wide SLO – Area 2).