Film and Media Studies

Film and Media Studies (FMS)

FMS 300 Introduction to Film Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers an introduction to the film medium with emphasis on aesthetics, theory and methods of critical analysis. Students will examine film as an art form, as a medium for communicating ideas and as a social and cultural force.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, analyze and evaluate the use and role of shots, angles, lighting, color, movement, editing, mise enscene and sound in cinema.
  • explain and evaluate the contributions of the cinematographer, writer, director, editor and actor to cinematic art.
  • explain and examine the codes and the conventions of film genre, myth, narrative, rhetoric.
  • compose a film scene and construct a storyboard by employing cinematic language.
  • recognize, discuss and examine the nature of culture, class, gender, and ethnicity in Hollywood mythologies and oppositional films.
  • identify, explain, and understand contemporary film theories and use these theories to analyze, interpret, and criticize motion pictures.

FMS 305 Film History

  • Same As:RTVF 305
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the art of motion pictures, using lectures and films. Students will study the history and development of motion pictures and will view, evaluate, and critique landmarks in the art of movie making. This course is the same as RTVF 305 and only one
may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze, interpret, and exercise critical judgment in the evaluation of film and media forms and cultures (SLO-1).
  • analyze film critically through stylistic, narrative, and thematic analyzes.
  • critique and understand films as art, literature, and communication.
  • recognize, articulate, and judge the visual, verbal, and audio conventions through which images, words, and sounds make meaning in film and media texts (SLO-2).
  • critique the stylistic, narrative, and thematic concerns in major works of film art.
  • identify, understand, and evaluate the language of film narration, editing, and cinematography.
  • develop and apply the technical language of film art and industry in evaluating film production and direction.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the professional, technical, and formal choices that realize, develop, or challenge existing practices and traditions in film (SLO-3).
  • employ basic critical approaches (formalistic, psychological, socio-political, and generic) in analyzing films and their cultural implications.
  • evaluate the role of technologies in the development of film art.
  • assess what type of information is needed for a research question, problem, or issue and identify, evaluate and effectively apply this information in scholarly or visual projects (SLO-4).
  • describe the history, development, genre, and movements of the film medium and recognize the contributions of national, minority, diasporic, and subaltern filmmakers (SLO-5).
  • classify and critique the periods, movements, major figures, landmark films, genres, and codes of film.
  • compare and contrast the work of different directors and the concerns of different national cinema.
  • recognize and evaluate the contributions of women and minorities to film.

FMS 310 Basic Screenwriting

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the creativity and techniques of screenwriting for short films, feature films, and television. Students will view and analyze exemplary films, participate in writing exercises and workshops, and complete a treatment and master scenes of a full-length project.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • understand and apply the elements of story structure and film narrative.
  • critically analyze produced scripts. Write film dialogue.
  • identify successful scenes. Develop three-dimensional characters.
  • apply concepts from mythology to plot and character development.
  • understand and apply literary techniques for sub-text to symbolism to create multi-layered narratives. Plot a feature film.
  • create proposals and treatments for film projects.
  • compose a short film or the first third of a feature-length film.

FMS 320 Film Genre

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the structure, mythology, style, themes and critical theory of one or more film genre, such as the comedy, the thriller and the film noir.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • understand genre theory, genre's relationship to popular culture, its role in fostering ideology and images of gender and ethnicity.
  • explain and examine the codes, conventions, myths and transformations of film genre.
  • apply current film theory to the analysis and criticism of genre films.
  • identify and analyze the relationship of cinematic aesthetics and visual motifs to a genre or genres.
  • write critical papers on film genre.
  • apply semiotics to the study of film genre.

FMS 488 Honors Seminar: Introduction to Critical Theory

  • Same As:HONOR 350
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course investigates questions of interpretation and representation in film, literature, media, and culture. Students examine contemporary critical and cultural theory, then apply these theories in analyzing a variety of texts from the Shakespearean play to the sciencefiction horror film. Theories introduced include, but are not limited to, semiotics, psychoanalysis, rhetorical criticism, gender theory, and postmodernism. Students intending to transfer into arts, film, literature, humanities, and cultural studies programs will find this course particularly useful in understanding the critical language of the university. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details
about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as HONOR 350, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN A DISCIPLINE OF STUDY AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS (SLO #2; College Wide SLO Area 3). This includes the ability to:
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts.
  • ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY (SLO #3, College Wide SLO – Area 4). This includes the ability to:
  • Apply information and resources necessary to develop academically and personally.
  • Utilize skills from one’s “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc.
  • RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF DECISIONS AND ACTIONS (SLO #4, College Wide SLO – Area 5). This includes the ability to:
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in ethical reasoning necessary to exercise responsibility as an ethical individual, professional, local and global citizen.
  • ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF A VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN A DISCIPLINE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE’S OWN LIFE (SLO #5, College Wide SLO – Area 2). This includes the ability to:
  • Understand, evaluate, and apply critical theory, theory's relationship to art and culture, its role in interpreting literary and visual arts, and examining ideology and representations of gender and ethnicity.
  • Apply current theory to the analysis and criticism of film, literature, and media.
  • Understand, evaluate and apply the basic concepts of semiotics, post-structuralism, psychoanalysis, gender theory, and postmodernism and their relationship to/influence on art and politics.

FMS 489 Honors Seminar: The Films of Alfred Hitchcock

  • Same As:HONOR 352
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This seminar studies the work of Alfred Hitchcock from the perspective of the key concepts in film theory. Students will investigate the films and criticism of one of the greatest and strangest directors, the self-styled master of suspense. This seminar takes a close reading of Hitchcock’s
most important films and the most significant writing on the director’s work. For students interested in film, media, art, literature, and the humanities, the course examines Hitchcock’s visual style, thematic concerns, and directorial techniques, and introduces the major critical
approaches to cinema studies. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course is the same as HONOR 352, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN A DISCIPLINE OF STUDY AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS (SLO #2; College Wide SLO Area 3). This includes the ability to:
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts.
  • ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY (SLO #3, College Wide SLO – Area 4). This includes the ability to:
  • Apply information and resources necessary to develop academically and personally.
  • Utilize skills from one’s “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc.
  • ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF A VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN A DISCIPLINE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE’S OWN LIFE (SLO #4, College Wide SLO – Area 2). This includes the ability to:
  • Identify the stylistic, narrative, and thematic concerns in the director's work.
  • Understand Hitchcock's contribution to the cinematic language (pure cinema, point of view, montage, mise-en-scene) and genre (the melodrama and the thriller).
  • Read, understand, evaluate, and compare the key critical appraisals of the director by Modelski, Wood, Spoto, Truffaut and others.
  • Apply critical theory (auteur, feminist, psychoanalytic, semiotic) in the analysis of the films and their cultural implications.
  • Participate in the seminar mode of learning, including seminar discussion and presentation of a creative and original paper of critical value to the study of Hitchcock.

FMS 495 Independent Studies in Film and Media Studies

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

Film and Media Studies, A.A. Degree

Program Map Here

Film, Television and Electronic Media, A.S.-T Degree

Program Map Here

Film, Television and Electronic Media, A.S.-T Degree, IGETC

Program Map Here