English

English - Creative Writing (ENGCW)

ENGCW 400 Creative Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (1) ENGCW 400, 410, 420, or 430 combined: maximum transfer credit is two courses; 2) ENGCW 400 and 480 combined: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area C2
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to guide students in creative writing through experience in three genres: short story, poetry, and creative non-fiction. The course includes analysis of literary models (professional writings in each genre), individual and class criticism of work in a workshop mode, and lecture on and discussion of literary techniques in each genre.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO #1, P-SLO #3)
  • demonstrate the ability to revise effectively his/her own writing using critical thinking skills.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO #2, P-SLO #4)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the use of literacy concepts in professional imaginative writing, such as point-of-view and unexpressed thinking for creative non-fiction, imagery and persona for poetry, and plot conflict in short fiction.
  • OBTAIN THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES. (SLO #2, P-SLO #5)
  • demonstrate the ability to compose one short story or part of a novel, a substantial amount of poetry, and one piece of creative non-fiction.
  • demonstrate the ability in group discussion and/or in writing to analyze other students' writing, providing both critical praise and suggestions for improvement.

ENGCW 410 Fiction Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (* ENGCW 400, 410, 420, or 430 combined: maximum credit, two courses)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area C2
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a creative writing course designed for students who wish to concentrate on fiction writing. Through lecture, discussion, assigned reading, writing exercises, short story (or novel chapter) writing, and critiques of student writing in a workshop mode, the student will examine critically the elements of literary creation. The students will keep a journal and prepare a portfolio of their work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO #1, P-SLO #3)
  • Demonstrate the ability to revise effectively his/her own writing using critical thinking skills.
  • Demonstrate the ability in group discussion and/or in writing to analyze other students’ writing, providing both critical praise and suggestions for improvement.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO #2, P-SLO #4)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the use of literary concepts in professional imaginative writing.
  • OBTAIN THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES. (SLO #3, P-SLO #5)
  • Demonstrate the ability to compose two short fiction stories.

ENGCW 420 Poetry Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ENGCW 400, 410, 420, or 430 combined: maximum transfer credit is two courses)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a creative writing course for students who wish to concentrate on poetry writing. Through lecture, discussion, assigned reading, writing exercises, poetry writing, and critiques of student writing in a workshop mode, the students will examine critically the elements of literary creation. The students will keep a journal and prepare a portfolio of their work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BE SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS (SLO# 1; PSLO # 3).
  • recognize some of the aesthetic factors which characterize well-written poetry, such as thoughtful line breaks and a reliance on specific images rather than on general statement as a way to communicate meaning.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS (SLO# 2; PSLO# 4).
  • analyze in group discussion and/or writing other students’ poems, providing both critical praise and suggestions for improvement.
  • OBTAIN THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES (SLO# 3; PSLO# 5).
  • effectively revise their own writing using critical thinking skills in an effort to incorporate such aesthetics into their own poems.

ENGCW 430 Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ENGCW 400, 410, 420, or 430 combined: maximum transfer credit is two courses)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a creative writing course concentrating on the literary essay. The class focuses on constructive in-class analysis of personal essays written by students. Students will write and critically examine essays such as the memoir, autobiography, reflective, and philosophical that have a literary, stylistic component. The class will also emphasize multi-cultural, multi-generational, mythological, and ecological topics. Students will prepare a portfolio of completed work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO #1, P-SLO #3)
  • learn methods of revision and apply them to their own work.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO #2, P-SLO #4)
  • critically examine examples of different types of personal essays for theme, structure, and style.
  • participate in critical analysis of works written for class.
  • OBTAIN THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES. (SLO #3, P-SLO #5)
  • write autobiographical essays.
  • compile a portfolio of essays.

ENGCW 452 College Literary Magazine

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Obtain hands-on experience as an editor for a nationally distributed and award-winning literary journal. Write, select, and edit manuscripts in the genres of poetry, short fiction, and creative non-fiction. Correspond with established authors and artists to create the campus’s annual literary journal. Learn to use a submission manager and obtain tips on publishing your writing from the editor’s point of view.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO #1, P-SLO #3)
  • gain increased opportunity for creative expression in writing and art.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO #2, P-SLO #4)
  • develop reading, writing, and oral expression skills along with critiquing and critical thinking skills.
  • OBTAIN THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES. (SLO #3, P-SLO #5)
  • see completion of writing process from creation of manuscript to publication in a magazine.
  • RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF VARIOUS MODES OF COMMUNICATION AND THE NEED TO USE THIS KNOWLEDGE RESPONSIBLY. (SLO #4, P-SLO #2)
  • assemble the contents of the annual literary magazine.
  • encourage others from the community to contribute manuscripts and art.
  • develop individual and group leadership skills.

ENGCW 480 Honors Seminar: Creative Writing and Culture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an honors seminar for students who wish to write fiction and to do so with an awareness of fiction’s role in culture. Students will study the relationship between cultural events and literary conventions: connections, for example, between World War II and Hemingway’s concise sentences, the birth of jazz and the language of the beatniks, Existentialism and Ralph Ellison’s view of character, or the systematic repression of Native American languages and Joy Harjo’s fluid syntax. While students become familiar with the history and cultural place of fiction, they will be writing and analyzing fiction of their own. Students will be encouraged both to “write from instinct” and to begin deliberately cultivating a style, identifying personal influences, and situating their writing in relation to major cultural events. This course may be taken only once for credit. Enrollment is limited to Honors
Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO #1, P-SLO #3)
  • interpret and discuss fiction in terms of its historical and cultural context.
  • play creatively with sentences and push the limits of standard grammar.
  • discuss their own fiction--its content and style--in terms of literary influences and historical events.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO #2, P-SLO #4)
  • read aloud with a sensitivity to the sounds and rhythms of words and sentences.
  • write fiction of a higher quality than when they entered the course: giving greater attention to details, strategically pacing their stories, evoking emotions from their readers, and creating complex, believable characters.
  • OBTAIN THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES. (SLO #3, P-SLO #5)
  • identify the conventional parts of fiction--character, plot, narrator, irony, metaphor etc.--and explain the major historical shifts in the definitions and functions of these terms.

ENGCW 495 Independent Studies in English - Creative Writing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

English - Education (ENGED)

ENGED 305 Structure of English

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Designed for prospective teachers or those entering professions requiring strong written language skills, this course affords students the opportunity to study the history of English, traditional and transformational grammars, linguistics, standard usage, phonology, and orthography. Students will examine the development and structure of the English language, language acquisition, and the cultural and linguistic diversity represented by the students in the California public school system. They will also apply grammatical concepts as they meet the 2,000 word writing requirement.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • UTILIZE ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NECESSARY TO FUNCTION SUCCESSFULLY AND COMPLETELY AT THE UNIVERSITY, IN THE WORKPLACE AND IN DIVERSE CULTURAL SETTINGS.(PSLO#1, SLO#1)
  • examine the history and structure of English.
  • compare and contrast the methods of language acquisition, including acquisition of English among culturally diverse populations.
  • apply knowledge of standard usage and differentiate between standard and non-standard usage in writing and writing instruction.
  • BECOME A SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READER AND WRITER, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (PSLO#3, SLO#2)
  • analyze and apply principles of phonology and orthography.
  • employ critical thinking skills in making appropriate rhetorical choices based on grammatical considerations.
  • ASSIST STUDENTS IN OBTAINING THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES. (PSLO#5, SLO#3)
  • apply the principles of traditional and transformative English grammars as those principles relate to writing.
  • apply techniques such as sentence combining to explain relationships between grammar and writing.

ENGED 320 Service Learning: Tutoring Elementary Students in Reading

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This class offers students an opportunity to learn and practice basic methods of tutoring elementary children in reading. Students will meet on campus for the first part of the semester to be trained, and then will be assigned to a nearby elementary school where they will have in-depth practice at tutoring elementary children. This course, which provides an early field experience for students interested in elementary education, may be taken once for credit. Prior to beginning work in the schools, students may be required to be fingerprinted and pass a TB test.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO#1: Define, clarify and analyze components of a developmentally-appropriate elementary school reading/language arts program.
  • Objective A: Compare and hypothesize how classroom instruction and classroom tutoring differ and complement one another to allow opportunities for all learners to read, write, speak, spell and listen.
  • Objective B: Discover how the various components of the elementary school reading/language arts programs are organized into a developmentally-appropriate curriculum by identifying how reading/language arts instruction is presented in the classroom.
  • Objective C: Interpret and analyze how the Reading/Language Arts Framework for California Public Schools K - 12 provides a theoretical and developmentally-appropriate base for curriculum development and instruction.
  • Objective D: Infer how the reading process relates to the reader as the integration of visual, auditory, psycho-social and cognitive functioning.
  • SLO#2: Demonstrate knowledge of and successful tutoring of developmentally-appropriate/student-focused reading/language arts lessons.
  • Objective A: Infer and critique how explicit and systematic instruction/assessment of phonics (including knowledge of the alphabetic principle, phonemic awareness and word-analysis techniques) allow learners to improve reading skills.
  • Objective B: Develop and practice in the elementary classroom various word-analysis lessons as which are appropriate to meet students' learning needs.
  • Objective C: Infer and critique how reading comprehension, spelling, listening and writing as a process are taught and assessed explicitly and implicitly in the classroom.
  • Objective D: Develop and practice vocabulary development lessons, reading comprehension lessons, spelling activities and/or writing process lessons as appropriate to meet students' learning needs in the elementary classroom.
  • Objective E: Assess the reading fluency of elementary students through the use of running records and/or reading fluency tests.
  • Objective F: Analyze and evaluate how a "print rich" elementary school classroom motivates children to read and to write.
  • SLO#3: Evaluate critical thinking skills, problem-solving skills and decision-making skills through successful tutoring and reflection on tutoring.
  • Objective A: Practice specific tutoring strategies and lessons (including, as appropriate, behavior modification techniques and memory enhancement techniques) to address identified areas of learner weakness and needs in the reading/language arts curriculum.
  • Objective B: Assess and evaluate one's growth as a tutor through analytical reflection of classroom tutoring.
  • Objective C: Incorporate professional language and professional judgment in development of all written work and/or oral presentations which reflect upon the classroom or instruction; the classroom teacher has the right to know what a tutor may perceive of the classroom or of teaching in the classroom.
  • SLO#4: Demonstrate college-level writing skills through all required written course assessment tools and through all written communication with teachers.
  • Objective A: Prepare and submit a letter of introduction to the classroom teacher.
  • Objective B: Prepare all course written assignments employing professional language and professional judgment when discussing, describing or analyzing classroom teaching, children and tutoring.

ENGED 495 Independent Studies in English - Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

English - Laboratory (ENGLB)

ENGLB 70 Writing Center I

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:27 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This laboratory course provides assistance in writing skills to students in all subject areas. Students may enter the course at any time during the first 9 weeks of the semester and earn either .5 or 1 unit. This course is graded on a credit/no credit basis. ENGLB 70 is recommended for students who are encountering difficulties in writing, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph or essay structure, and who would benefit from individual tutor/instructor assistance.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the writing process by engaging with the steps of writing in development of written assignments. (SLO 1)
  • Write with a focus in development of a controlling idea (thesis statement) and with the assistance of word process. (Objective 1A)
  • Facilitate the use of word processing to assist in the steps of the writing process. (SLO 2)
  • Use word processing in the completion of writing tasks. (Objective 2A)

ENGLB 72 Writing Center II

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:27 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 19 or ESLW 40, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Writing Center II is an independent study course designed to provide one-on-one assistant for students who experience significant difficulty in writing. The course is particularly recommended for students who test into ENGWR 42/ENGRD 19, but may be taken by any student in any discipline needing significant assistance in writing. Students may earn .5 to 1 unit of credit and the course may be added until the end of the 9th week of the regular semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Write clear sentences for the purpose of academic writing. (SLO 1)
  • Demonstrate ability to write for an academic purpose. (Objective 1A)
  • Identify basic elements of text structure including: paragraph, topic sentences, supporting details, and examples. (Objective 1B)

ENGLB 73 Writing Center III

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:27 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 59, ENGWR 58, or ESLW 50, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Writing Center III is designed for students seeking to improve their writing skills with the express purpose of learning to write for success in college level courses. The course is particularly recommended for students who test into ENGWR 58/ENGRD 59but may be taken by any student in any discipline seeking to improve in writing for an academic purpose. Students may earn .5 to 1 unit of credit and the course may be added until the end of the 9th week of the regular semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Write for the purpose of expressing comprehension and for evaluating text. (SLO 1)
  • Evaluate one's own writing in terms of the ability to develop paragraphs with controlling ideas, main ideas, clear organization of thought, and proper grammar. (Objective 1A)
  • Work independently with regards to completing discipline related writing coursework and homework. (Objective 1B)

ENGLB 74 Writing Center IV

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:27 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101, ENGWR 300, ESLW 310, or ESLW 320, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Writing Center IV is an independent study course which provides assistance in developing writing skills for students who may be enrolled in college level courses where writing demands are significant, but the student is not yet fully confident or consistent in his/her ability to write as demanded by specific discipline courses. This course is particularly recommended for students who are enrolled in or who test into ENGWR 101 or ENGWR 300. The course is open to any student in any course seeking to improve in writing for an academic purpose. Students may earn .5 to 1 unit of credit and the course may be added until the end of the 9th week of the regular semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an improved ability to practice reading, thinking and writing as interrelated processes. (SLO 1)
  • Identify and practice components of college level writing. (Objective 1A)
  • Identify and practice components of writing an academic research papers. (Objective 1B)

ENGLB 75 Reading Center I

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:27 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Reading is a fundamental skill required by all college students. Reading Center I is designed to meet that need by providing independent study in foundational reading skills following diagnostic assessment of the student's reading abilities. The course is open to all students in all disciplines where reading demands are significant. Students may elect to take the course for .5 to 1.0 unit and the course may be added through the 9th week of the semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate general and specific improvement of reading ability based upon diagnostic assessment of need. (SLO 1)
  • Identify individual reading strengths and needs based upon diagnostic assessment of reading ability and in consultation with instructor. (Objective 1A)
  • Use specifically focused reading strategies to identify a focus for reading. (Objective 1B)

ENGLB 76 Reading Center II

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:27 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Reading Center II is an independent study course open to any student experiencing significant difficulty in reading as required for college. The course may especially be recommended for students enrolled in ENGRD 19/ENGWR 42 or ESLR 40, but may be taken by any student in any discipline where reading demands are significant and where the student may not be prepared. Students may elect to take the course for .5 to 1.0 unit and the course may be added through the 9th week of the semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Read for the purpose of analyzing text to enhance comprehension. (SLO 1)
  • Identify and utilize vocabulary techniques for learning new words.(Objective 1A)
  • Use context to identify meaning. (Objective 1B)
  • Identify main ideas in text and determine how main idea relates to basic structure of paragraphs and texts of extended length. (Objective 1C)

ENGLB 77 Reading Center III

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:27 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 59, ENGWR 58, or ESLR 50, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Reading Center independent practice at reading skills necessary for college success. Students meet with an instructor for determination of reading needs, and an agreed upon prescription is then developed. Student may elect to take the course for.5 unit or 1.0 unit. This lab class may be recommended by instructors of ENGRD 59/ENGWR 58 but is open to any student in any discipline wishing to improve her/his reading skills. The course be added until the end of the 9th week of the semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate general reading abilities, which will lead to success in college level reading tasks. (SLO 1)
  • Improve vocabulary range and usage, comprehension, study reading, reading rate, and critical reading through the use of analytical and critical reading strategies. (Objective 1A)
  • Improve vocabulary skills by following a diagnostic prescriptive methodology. (Objective 1B)

ENGLB 78 Reading Center IV

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:27 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110, ENGRD 310, ENGRD 312, ESLR 310, or ESLR 320, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Critical reading is a skill needed for success in college and particularly in 300 level courses. Many students enter those courses who are not confident in their reading abilities or their abilities to read critically. Reading Center 4 provides practice in this area. This course is open to any student in any discipline where reading and research may be required. It may be recommended for students enrolled in ENGRD 310, ENGRD 312, or ENGRD 110. Students may enroll through the 9th week of the semester and may elect to take the course for .5 unit or 1.0 unit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze and interpret a variety of college level texts across a variety of college disciplines. (SLO 1)
  • Identify how research has been analyzed in a variety of academic research papers. (Objective 1A)
  • Practice interpretation of research findings and conclusions. (Objective 1B)
  • Practice writing research conclusions based upon one's analysis of data (or literature review) from a variety of academic research papers from a variety of disciplines. (Objective 1C)

English - Literature (ENGLT)

ENGLT 303 Introduction to the Short Story

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Students will read, analyze, and discuss short stories by a wide variety of writers. Reading will emphasize American and British writers but will include authors from other countries as well. Thematic emphasis will focus on the connections between literature and the human condition.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • APPLY CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AS SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS(SLO #1; PSLO #3):
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the characteristic features of the short fiction genre.
  • Read and analyze critically works of short fiction written in the last 200 years.
  • Discover connections between literary themes and life situations.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking about those discoveries both verbally and in writing.

ENGLT 310 English Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Study of significant works of major English authors from Beowulf through Samuel Johnson, with consideration of the most important aspects of English literary history.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS (SLO #1; PSLO #3)
  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE MAJOR ERAS OF DEVELOPMENT OF LITERATURE IN ENGLAND FROM ANGLO-SAXON TIMES THROUGH THE NEOCLASSICAL PERIOD OF THE 18TH CENTURY (SLO #2)
  • read and understand the different genres and writers in English literature
  • demonstrate an understanding of English culture and history as expressed in the literature
  • DEMONSTRATE ANALYTICAL SKILLS IN CLASS DISCUSSION AND WRITING ASSIGNMENTS (SLO #3)
  • write interpretive essays showing insight into the themes expressed in the literature of the period

ENGLT 311 English Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 165
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Survey of significant works of major English authors from the beginning of Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century to the work of major authors in the Twentieth Century, with consideration of the important aspects of English literary history.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME A SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READER AND WRITER, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (PSLO #3; SLO #1)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the major eras of development of literature from the beginning of Romanticism in the 18th Century through the present.
  • read and understand the major types of writers in British literature.
  • demonstrate an understanding of English culture and history as expressed in literature.
  • write interpretive essays showing insight into the themes expressed in this literature.
  • demonstrate analytical skills in class discussions and writing assignments.

ENGLT 320 American Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of the more representative works in American literature from early America through the Civil War.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS.(SLO 1, P-SLO 3)
  • respond in writing and discussion to major literary works of the United States.
  • demonstrate an awareness--through literature--of the development of cultural patterns in America.
  • demonstrate the ability to interpret a piece of literature and to discuss intelligently the problems and ideas presented in literature.
  • recognize and analyze the elements of poetry, non-fiction and fiction.
  • demonstrate the ability to recognize the power of literature as a humanizing force.
  • demonstrate understanding of appropriate academic discourse and the conventions of critical literary analysis
  • relate the literary works to their historical, philosophical, social, political, regional, and/or aesthetic contexts

ENGLT 321 American Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 135
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Students will survey the representative works in American Literature after the Civil War.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITER, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS.(SLO 1, P-SLO 3)
  • respond in writing and discussion to major literary works of the United States, from after the Civil War through the present.
  • demonstrate an awareness--through literature--of the development of cultural patterns in America.
  • demonstrate the ability to interpret a piece of literature and to discuss intelligently the problems and ideas presented in literature.
  • recognize and analyze the elements of poetry, prose, and drama.
  • demonstrate the ability to recognize the power of literature as a humanizing force.

ENGLT 330 African American Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

A survey of the most representative African American writers from the slave narrative to the present. The comprehensive literary study includes analysis of significant historical and cultural influences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AND IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS (SLO #1; PSLO #3)
  • evaluate the literature critically and assess its historical significance.
  • demonstrate an appreciation for the contributions of African American Writers to mainstream literature.
  • demonstrate critical thinking skills in class discussion and in written analytical essays.
  • demonstrate the effects of African American Literature on the reader through the use of textual analysis and reader response.
  • demonstrate the ability to incorporate bibliographic research effectively into analytical papers.

ENGLT 335 Latino, Mexican-American, and Chicano Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores literature (poetry, short stories, novels, creative nonfiction, and performance) authored by Latinx writers. It typically examines the following themes: resistance, survival, identity, homeland, immigration, the border, socio-political activism, gender, and sexuality. All or most of each text is in English. Knowledge of the Spanish language is helpful but not required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • CONTRIBUTE TO A COMMUNITY OF EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, AND USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO #1, PSLO #3)
  • demonstrate awareness of the effects of literature on the reader through textual analysis, classroom discussion, and response papers.
  • analyze the themes of gender and ethnicity and the concomitant issues of protest, identity and stereotyping as they emerge from various writers.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the difficulties facing a range of Latinx people in a culture dominated by traditional European values.
  • analyze how the Latinx authors express their responses to racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, and/or classism.
  • analyze how authors celebrate their connection and relationship to Latinx culture write interpretive essays based on the literature.
  • demonstrate the ability to perform bibliographic research and incorporate findings into analytic papers that evaluate literary, historical, and sociological aspects of diverse cultures.

ENGLT 336 Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This class will examine literature written in the United States during the last 50 years in which the issues of race and racism, ethnicity and ethnocentrism, and culture and assimilation predominate the thematic concerns. All genres will be examined, as well as writers from many of the ethnic groups in America, including African Americans, Mexican Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AND IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO #1, PSLO #3)
  • demonstrate awareness of the effects of literature on the reader through textual analysis, classroom discussion, and response papers.
  • analyze the themes of gender and ethnicity and the concomitant issues of protest, identity and stereotyping as they emerge from various writers.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the difficulties facing women and minorities in culture dominated by traditional European values.
  • analyze how the author’s voice expresses his or her response to racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, and/or classism.
  • write interpretive essays based on the literature.
  • demonstrate the ability to perform bibliographic research and incorporate findings into analytic papers that evaluate literary, historical, and sociological aspects of the diverse cultures present in the United States.

ENGLT 340 World Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course will acquaint students with a diverse range of literature from the Ancient World through the Renaissance. Students will identify the commonalities and differences in the myths, epic poetry, philosophy, sacred texts, lyric poetry, prose, and drama of early Middle Eastern, Asian, African, South American, European and North American literatures.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Prepare students to become self-reliant, evaluative readers and writers able to use critical thinking to communicate understanding and appreciation of literature. (SLO #1; PSLO #1, #2, #3)
  • Analyze and evaluate similarities and differences in theme, myth, and archetype apparent in literatures of different cultures.
  • Evaluate historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the various literatures.
  • Analyze and apply various interpretative tools or critical approaches to a diverse selection of world literatures.
  • SLO #2: Appraise significant aspects of culture and its contributions, and appreciate the social experiences of early Middle Eastern, Asian, African, South American, European, and North American cultures. (PSLO #4,#5)
  • Evaluate the effects of ethnocentricity, ethnicity, ageism, racism, classism, and sexism and synthesize this information in short essays, a research paper, and written exam.
  • Analyze cultural tolerance and awareness in journals, short essays, a research paper, and written exams.

ENGLT 341 World Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 145
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a survey of significant masterpieces from mid-seventeenth to late-twentieth century literature.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE THAT HE/SHE IS A SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READER AND WRITER, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND/OR WORKPLACE SETTINGS (SLO #1; PSLO #3)
  • identify themes, myths, and archetypes as they emerge in world literature.
  • recognize characteristics of various literary movements and genre as they emerge and develop in the chronology of the written tradition.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the relationships between literature and significant historical events.
  • evaluate literature critically and assess its historical significance.
  • respond in writing and discussion to major literary works of the world.

ENGLT 343 Contemporary Third World Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to literature of writers from Africa, Central and South America, Asia and the Middle East. Approached through the reading and discussion of all genre, basic elements of literature interpretation will be stressed to enhance understanding of the world view and culture of writers often not covered in other literature classes. A special effort will be made to sample recent Nobel Prize winners from each area of the world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO#1, PSLO #3)
  • demonstrate critical skills in class discussion and writing analytical essays.
  • demonstrate awareness of the effects of literature on the reader through textual analysis, classroom discussion, and response papers.
  • analyze the themes that often emerge from oppressed peoples.
  • analyze how the author’s voice shows his or her coping with intercultural struggles.
  • SLO #2: FACILITATE STUDENTS TO RECOGNIZE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF VAROUS MODES OF COMMUNICATION AND THE NEED TO USE THIS KNOWLEDGE RESPONSIBLY. (SLO #2, PSLO #2)
  • demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the cultural diversity found in writing from different parts of the world.
  • SLO #3: ENABLE STUDENTS TO DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO #3, PSLO #4)
  • write personal response essays using various forms
  • demonstrate the ability to perform bibliographic research and incorporate findings into original analytical papers that evaluate literary, historical, and sociological aspects of diverse culture literature.

ENGLT 345 Mythologies of the World

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores and examines several universal themes of human experience as found through a broad survey of actual myths gathered from around the world. Special emphasis is also placed on the relationships and the similarities of various mythologies. The course includes fairly intensive instruction of primary interpretative theories of mythological research and analysis. This course emphasizes some of the myths underlying the western world view and recognizes diversity and commonality in myths from Middle Eastern, Native North American, African, Asian, and South American cultures. Students analyze, contrast, and compare myths on topics including the goddess culture, creation, the hero's journey, Judeo-Christian themes, the dying god, and psychological applications. From this process, they will gain an understanding of ethnocentrism, ethnicity and racism and the impact of these on the American experience. The format of instruction will involve lecture, group discussion, and other activities.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AND IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS (SLO#1; PSLO #3).
  • articulate an understanding of such themes in mythology as human relationship to God, deities, sacrifice, birth, creation, destruction, healing, and the hero’s journey, and the many cultures in which these themes occur.
  • develop an appreciation of the common thematic framework that underlies the mythologies of various cultures and demonstrate in short written responses, formal essays, and written exams the ability to analyze, using various interpretative tools, the metaphorical messages inherent in myth.
  • engage in critical analysis of myths through reading, writing, and discussion of mythologies from around the world.
  • SLO #2: FACILITATE STUDENTS TO RECOGNIZE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF VAROUS MODES OF COMMUNICATION AND THE NEED TO USE THIS KNOWLEDGE RESPONSIBLY (SLO #2; PLSO #2)
  • demonstrate an ability to compare, contrast, and analyze significant aspects of the cultural contributions and social experiences as manifest within the myths of Western, Eastern, Middle Eastern, Native North American, African, Asian and South American mythic traditions.
  • SLO #3: ENABLE STUDENTS TO DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS (SLO #3; PLSO #4)
  • develop a basic understanding of symbolism in myth, literature, and culture.
  • apply an understanding of universal mythic themes and images to the reading of modern literature.

ENGLT 360 Women in Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Eligibility for ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for women and men who are interested in examining the roles women have occupied in literature, both as writers and as protagonists. Emphasis will be placed on literature that develops protagonists and explores literary themes that focus on women's experiences in childhood, adolescence, marriage, childbirth and child rearing, death, love, dependence, independence, and their own creativity. Female authors and protagonists from Western, Eastern, and Third World countries will be included. Male authors may also be included. Over the course of the semester, students will examine issues of ethnicity, ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, classism, gender inequity, and religious differences that are raised in the literature under discussion. In order to develop a sense of cultural tolerance to such issues, the literature will include a variety of genres, such as short stories, novels, plays, and poetry, the emphasis to be determined by the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO 1; PSLO #3)
  • demonstrate critical skills in class discussion and writing analytical essays.
  • demonstrate awareness of the effects of literature on the reader through textual analysis, classroom discussion, and response papers.
  • analyze the themes that are unique to women as viewed in literature.
  • SLO #2: FACILITATE STUDENTS TO RECOGNIZE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF VAROUS MODES OF COMMUNICATION AND THE NEED TO USE THIS KNOWLEDGE RESPONSIBLY. (SLO #2, PSLO #2) demonstrate an understanding of and sensitivity to the values, challenges, and triumphs women encounter. demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the literary contributions of women.
  • demonstrate an understanding of and sensitivity to the values, challenges, and triumphs women encounter.
  • demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the literary contributions of women.
  • SLO #3: ENABLE STUDENTS TO DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO #3, PSLO #4) write personal response essays using various forms. demonstrate the ability to perform bibliographic research and incorporate findings into original analytical papers that show insight into the issues raised in the literature including ethnocentrism, ethnicity, ageism, racism, classism, sexism, and religious difference.
  • write personal response essays using various forms.
  • demonstrate the ability to perform bibliographic research and incorporate findings into original analytical papers that show insight into the issues raised in the literature.

ENGLT 370 Children and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed primarily for parents, prospective teachers, preschool workers and those in frequent contact with children and/or interested in literature written for children. Topics include wide reading of historical and contemporary children's literature, criteria for selection, and practice in presenting and responding to literature, including storytelling and oral reading.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop and apply criteria for evaluating children’s literature (SLO#1).
  • develop principles of selection of literature for children.
  • understand and interpret the contributions of outstanding authors, illustrators and critics of children’s literature.
  • recognize the characteristics and value of the various genres of children's literature.
  • understand literary terminology, including the elements of fiction and poetic devices and develop skill at expressing ideas in class literary discussions.
  • develop critical thinking skills: defining issues; gathering, analyzing and evaluating ideas; synthesizing and developing conclusions.
  • develop ideas and practical activities for helping children to experience, appreciate, and respond to literature (SLO#2).
  • interpret and apply the theories and practice of oral reading and storytelling.

ENGLT 402 Introduction to Shakespeare and Film

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

In this course, students will draw connections between traditional and contemporary literary genres as they read William Shakespeare's plays and critically analyze film versions of these plays. Students will read and analyze a selection of Shakespeare's histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances in the context of Elizabethan drama. Then they will view a variety of cinematic interpretations of these plays and compare and contrast such elements as plot, character, theme, staging, and critical and directorial interpretation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AND IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS (SLO #1; PSLO #3)
  • Identify the components of comedy, tragedy, history, and romance.
  • Analyze the cultural and societal implications of the plays.
  • Develop, articulate, and support interpretations of the plays.
  • Correlate the study of Shakespearean drama to the study of Shakespeare’s plays on film.
  • Contrast plot, character, theme, setting and staging in the plays and films.
  • Analyze critical and directorial interpretations of Shakespeare’s plays on film.
  • Recognize the study of written and visual Shakespearean texts as a humanizing force.

ENGLT 488 Honors - Literature Adapted into Film

  • Same As:HONOR 378
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the Cosumnes River College Catalog.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3A; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course analyzes the process, challenges, failures, and successes of adapting literary and stage material into film. It compares faithful and unfaithful adaptations through reading the original texts and viewing the adapted films with an awareness of their historical and cultural contexts. The course examines intention, creative distinctions, as well as limits and strengths of each medium. This course requires at least one research essay proposing and justifying details for an adaptation and including appropriate MLA documentation. This course is the same as HONOR 378. This course, under either name, may be taken one time for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • CRITICALLY ANALYZE, COMPARE, AND EVALUATE VARIOUS WORKS OF LITERATURE AND FILM (SLO#1; PSLO #4 and #1; Honors Prog. SLO #2 and #5). Outcome may be evaluated by all or some of the following criteria:
  • Annotate and analyze written texts and respond thoughtfully to them.
  • Analyze and summarize films and respond thoughtfully to them
  • Determine themes, plot structure, characters, and symbols used in written works and films.
  • Question a director’s intention and effectiveness of the director’s choices.
  • Compare and contrast elements of adaptations (such as theme for example) to the corresponding elements in the original texts.
  • Construct criteria for judging strengths and weaknesses of adaptations.
  • Appraise the successes and failures of adaptations.
  • Assess the effects of historical and/or social context for each work studied.
  • Critique his or her own and other student writing.
  • APPLY COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY AS SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS (SLO#2; PSLO #2 and #3; Honors Prog. SLO #2 and #5). Outcome may be evaluated by all or some of the following criteria:
  • Demonstrate awareness of the effects of literature on the reader through textual analysis, classroom discussion, and response papers.
  • Apply terminology from literary studies.
  • Analyze and interpret elements of literature.
  • Appraise the strengths and weaknesses inherent in the genres of fiction, non-fiction, and drama.
  • Evaluate literary texts in cultural context, as cultural and artistic expressions in their historical and social background.
  • Compose interpretive essays based on the literature.
  • Propose his or her own plan of adapting a literary work into film and justify the choices made in this proposal.
  • ANALYZE, CRITIQUE, AND EXPRESS IDEAS EFFECTIVELY AS SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE VIEWERS OF FILMS BY APPLYING COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (SLO#3; PSLO #2 and #4; Honors Prog. SLO #2 and #5). Outcome may be evaluated by all or some of the following criteria:
  • Apply terminology from film studies and critical theories.
  • Analyze and the interpret elements of film.
  • Appraise the strengths and weaknesses inherent in the genres of film.
  • Evaluate films based on concepts such as narrative modes, genre conventions, and production exigencies.
  • Evaluate films in cultural context, as cultural and artistic expressions in their historical and social background.
  • Compose interpretive essays based on the literature.
  • ASSESS ISSUES AS WELL AS RESEARCH, EVALUATE, AND SYNTHESIZE SOURCES TO SUPPORT A THESIS BY APPLYING COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (SLO#4; PSLO #2, #3 and #5; Honors Prog. SLO # 3 and #4. Outcome may be evaluated by all or some of the following criteria:
  • Evaluate and justify his or her own choices made in a proposed adaptation of a literary work.
  • Integrate details from research to support his or her own choices made in the proposed adaptation.
  • Appraise and use a variety of research techniques.
  • Evaluate sources.
  • Research and incorporate sources effectively and meaningfully in writing.
  • Summarize, paraphrase, and directly quote outside sources as support for his or her ideas and/or represent a belief held by the opposition.
  • Use MLA documentation format correctly.

ENGLT 495 Independent Studies in Literature

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

English - Reading (ENGRD)

ENGRD 19 Foundations of Reading and Writing Improvement

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Enrollment in the course will be limited by skills of students in reading and writing as demonstrated through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course integrates and accelerates reading and writing at the basic skills level with a focus on learning to use language to learn. Course content, activities, and assignments integrate reading and writing for an academic purpose. Reading and writing are instructed and contextualized through a focus on a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts, and through the discussion of the meaning of a college education (including a focus on student services, academic programs, and campus events). Successful completion of this course will serve as a prerequisite for ENGRD 59/ENGWR 58 at Cosumnes River College. Placement in the course will be through the college assessment process; self-placement will not be allowed. This course is the same as ENGWR 42, and only one may be taken for credit. See "Cross-Listed Courses" in the catalog.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Apply Standard English conventions in a variety of texts read and written (i.e., sentences, paragraphs, extended texts of multiple paragraphs). (SLO 1)
  • Recognize and compose complete sentences by applying correct usage of grammar and punctuation at a basic level.
  • Demonstrate at a basic level, control of punctuation, spelling, capitalization, and grammar within paragraphs and in texts of multiple paragraphs.
  • Apply context clues and structural analysis to decode words and to determine word meaning. (SLO 2)
  • Apply basic structures of paragraphs in a variety of extended texts. (SLO 3)
  • Write paragraphs with stated main ideas and supporting details.
  • Infer meaning within a variety of texts read and written. (SLO 4)
  • Draw logical conclusions from texts of varying lengths.
  • Evaluate personal opinions about texts read by explaining those opinions in writing.

ENGRD 59 Reading Development with Writing

  • Same As:ENGWR 58
  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 19 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The focus of this course will be on writing and reading instruction as integrally related skills. Students will study and practice reading comprehension in the context of the writing process with the goal of accelerating the pathway to the English Reading and English Writing
requirements. Students will develop critical thinking skills and the ability to write clear and correct sentences as they write a variety of focused, developed, organized paragraphs and essays. Students will write both full-process and in-class essays. This course may include a departmental final or portfolio assessment. Successful completion of this course will serve as a prerequisite for ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110 only at Cosumnes River College. As enrollment into course will be based upon prerequisite, there will be no self-placement. This course is the same as ENGWR 58, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Comprehend, think critically, and respond appropriately in writing to a variety of professionally written non-fiction and fiction texts. (SLO 1)
  • Use context to determine the meanings of words and to interpret the meaning behind a variety of non-fiction and fiction texts.
  • Differentiate between main ideas and support details in a variety of non-fiction texts.
  • Develop written responses with clearly stated main ideas/thesis statements and appropriate support details (including facts and supported opinions developed through careful critical thinking) when responding to a variety of non-fiction and fiction texts.
  • Identify implied meanings and formulate appropriate conclusions in reading a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Identify and analyze basic organizational patterns in a variety of expository texts (e.g., generalization-example, cause-effect, and comparison-contrast).
  • Compose fully developed, logically structured paragraphs and essays using the stages of pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing.(SLO 2)
  • Achieve coherence and unity in essay form with planned organization and the use of transitions.
  • Achieve various purposes through writing.
  • Develop text with thoughtful, focused thesis statements, relevant topic sentences, specific examples and details.
  • Develop skill and confidence in writing timed essays.
  • Recognize and begin to apply the conventions of standard written English. (SLO 3)
  • Identify standard written English conventions in a variety of written texts.
  • Write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
  • Recognize and correct major sentence errors in one’s own writing, such as fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • Use word processor for composition and revision.

ENGRD 110 Comprehension Strategies and Vocabulary Development For College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 59 or ENGWR 58 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This reading course in designed to help students prepare for college level reading by refining vocabulary, literal and inferential comprehension skills, textbook reading techniques, and study skills and by reading for pleasure. Efficiency is gained by learning to vary rate and comprehension depending upon purposes for reading. Students are encouraged to enroll in ENGLB 70 for access to individualized help in the Reading and Writing Center.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Read actively.
  • make predictions before reading and adjust them while reading
  • survey the organization of the text
  • assess prior knowledge and personal experience
  • ask guide questions to connect ideas
  • SLO #2 Demonstrate a variety of vocabulary development techniques.
  • employ dictionary skills to define unknown words
  • understand the meaning of commonly used prefixes, root, and suffixes
  • understand parts of speech
  • apply the above structural analysis to define unknown words
  • examine the surrounding contexts to define unknown words by formal definition, example, contrast ideas, and logical reasoning
  • establish and expand specialized vocabulary
  • SLO #3 Identify stated and implied main ideas and supporting details in textbooks, periodicals, fictions, and various appropriate reading materials.
  • SLO #4 Construct critical reading skills.
  • differentiate between facts, opinions, and informed opinions
  • draw proper conclusions and make judgments upon examining factual information and implied messages in the text
  • interpret author’s point of view and tone
  • identify literal and figurative language
  • SLO #5 Implement textbook comprehension techniques.
  • implement SQ3R technique
  • construct outlines
  • produce summaries
  • organize information by making concept maps
  • employ effective highlighting skills
  • SLO #6 Adjust reading rates and techniques.
  • determine purpose of reading to choose a proper reading rate
  • adapt various reading rates to achieve the purpose of reading
  • utilize and adjust effective reading techniques to accommodate reading rates

ENGRD 113 Reading and Writing Skills for College

  • Same As:ENGWR 109
  • Units:4.5
  • Hours:72 hours LEC; 27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 59 or ENGWR 58 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This integrated reading and writing course is designed to accelerate the preparation for college reading and writing competency requirement for students who are assessed into one level below transfer English courses. This course prepares students for ENGRD 310/312 and ENGWR 300 with integrated teaching and learning in both reading and writing to accelerate a pathway for English Reading and Writing requirements. Students will learn to develop reading skills in vocabulary expansion, unlocking meanings with context clues and word parts, increasing comprehension, SQ3R, and critical thinking. Students will also learn to develop skills in writing correct, clear, and concise sentences with proper English grammar that transfer to well developed and organized paragraphs and essays. Other skills include paraphrasing, summarizing, pre-reading and pre-writing techniques, revising and editing essays, analyzing and comparing ideas, identifying author’s tone, bias, and purpose. This course is most ideal for students who are assessed into both ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 101. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have met the prerequisite for ENGRD 310/312 and ENGWR 300. This course may include a departmental final. This course is the same as ENGWR 109, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Demonstrate proficiency with reading and writing as a process that includes pre-reading/writing, reading/drafting, and post-reading and writing.
  • Objective 1A: Annotate written texts.
  • Objective 1B: Identify organizational thought patterns in various styles of text.
  • Objective 1C: Make predictions before reading and adjust them while reading.
  • Objective 1D: Assess prior knowledge and personal experience through brainstorming, asking questions, and free write to make association with written texts.
  • Objective 1E: Construct summaries and outlines of written texts.
  • SLO #2 Demonstrate proficiency in composing and recognizing coherent sentences, paragraphs and essays in proper English grammar in various reading materials and writing tasks.
  • Objective 2A: Understand parts of speech and apply the understanding in writing.
  • Objective 2B: Establish and expand specialized vocabulary and choose the appropriate words to express ideas.
  • Objective 2C: Use clear and varied sentences in writing with proper punctuation, capitalization and word form.
  • Objective 2D: Develop error-free prose and recognize common errors in spelling in different styles of writing.
  • Objective 2E: Achieve coherence and unity in writing with a focused and logical thesis statement
  • Objective 2F: Organize evidence and examples to support ideas in a logical manner that fits the style of writing and fulfill the purpose of writing
  • SLO #3 Construct and demonstrate critical thinking skills through analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing and through applying appropriate reading and writing strategies.
  • Objective 3A: Differentiate between facts, opinions, and informed opinions to interpret author’s tone and point of view.
  • Objective 3B: Draw proper conclusions and make effective evaluation upon examining factual information and implied messages in the text.
  • Objective 3C: Construct arguments in writing and provide evidence to support a claim.
  • Objective 3D: Incorporate and integrate multiple outside sources adequately and properly in writing.
  • Objective 3E: Adapt various reading techniques to accommodate reading rates
  • Objective 3F: Follow MLA format in citing various sources when writing to respond to reading.
  • SLO #4 Apply appropriate comprehension strategies using effective and sufficient techniques in various reading materials and reflect such skills in written communication.
  • Objective 4A: Implement and apply SQ3R (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review) technique.
  • Objective 4B: Employ dictionary skills, structural analysis, and context clues to define unknown words.
  • Objective 4C: Understand the meaning of commonly used prefixes, roots, and suffixes.
  • Objective 4D: Use concept map to organize information that reflects comprehension of written texts.
  • Objective 4E: Employ effective highlighting skills.
  • Objective 4F: Apply, analyze and organize primary and secondary sources to synthesize ideas.
  • SLO #5 Apply study skills.
  • Objective 5A: Use annotation, highlighting, summarizing, outlining and mapping to comprehend, evaluate and analyze written text.
  • Objective 5B: Employ proper time management skills to organize the process of assignment completion.

ENGRD 119 College Textbook Reading Skills

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers instruction in academic reading skills to students who are concurrently enrolled in a college course. The instruction includes informal lecture, self-paced individual work, workshop, guided practice, and assisted learning. Pass or No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Understand the composition and structure of written text in various styles in academic discipline.
  • Objective 1A: Recognize the structure of a paragraph and different types of supports.
  • Objective 1B: Identify stated and implied main idea and support details.
  • Objective 1C: Recognize the organization patterns of a written text.
  • Objective 1D: Understand writer's use of language to achieve the purpose.
  • SLO #2 Build and expand specialized vocabulary for different disciplines.
  • Objective 2A: Understand roots, prefixes and suffixes and etymology in vocabulary development.
  • Objective 2B: Unlock the meaning of unknown words using contextual clues.
  • SLO #3 Apply study skills.
  • Objective 3A: Use annotation, highlighting, summarizing, outlining, and mapping to comprehend, evaluate and analyze written text.
  • Objective 3B: Employ proper time management skills to organize the process of assignment completion and reading process.

ENGRD 200 Reading the American Cultural Experience

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:This course is not open to students who have already completed ENGRD 310: Critical Reading as Critical Thinking or ENGRD 312: Academic Textbook Reading.
  • General Education:AA/AS Area VI
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This academic English Reading course examines the crucial questions of what it means to read critically and at college level. Students will engage in extensive reading in and out of class as they focus on analyzing and interpreting a variety of texts. The focus of required reading will be on using language to analyze and interpret multicultural issues and conflicts which arise in diverse cultural settings and communities. The purpose of this language study will be to develop academic vocabulary, academic research and writing skills, and the ability to read and think analytically and critically about the written word. Concurrent enrollment in ENGLB 74 (Writing Center IV) or ENGLB 78 (Reading Center IV) will allow for concentrated independent study on the content and requirements of the course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Read analytically and critically in a variety of texts interrogating the multicultural American experience. (SLO 1)
  • Apply skills of making inferences, distinguishing fact and opinion by appraising an author’s purpose, tone, bias, and point of view in a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts. (Objective A)
  • Evaluate the quality and sufficiency of evidence and other forms of support for a written argument which critiques the multicultural American experience. (SLO 2)
  • Assess elements of argumentation in extended text focusing on propaganda, assumptions, faulty analogies, non-sequiturs, deductive and inductive patterns, and topics relative to the issue of the multicultural American experience. (Objective A)
  • Select suitable critical reading/metacognitive reading strategies to construct meaning and self-regulate comprehension and learning. (SLO 3)
  • Assess proper strategies to regulate reading rate for reader-specified and text/context-specified purpose. (Objective A)
  • Respond appropriately in writing to a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts. (SLO 4)
  • Develop analytical response essays to stories, essays, and arguments regarding the multicultural American experience. (Objective A)
  • Write an argumentative research paper on a significant aspect of the multicultural American experience. (Objective B)
  • Apply appropriate mechanics when writing. (Objective C)

ENGRD 310 Critical Reading as Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGLB 70, ENGWR 101, or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the theory and practice of essential reading skills for proficient academic performance with an emphasis on (1) reading strategy applications in textbook, fiction, and nonfiction, (2) critical analysis and evaluation of college level academic texts in multicultural writings, fiction and non-fiction reading, (3) critical and analytical evaluation of college level expository, narrative, descriptive, and argumentative essays and research, (4) development and expansion of critical thinking skills required in today’s diverse work environment, (5) vocabulary development, and (6) development of flexibility in reading rate. This course meets the Reading Competency requirement for the AA and AS degrees, and is CSU transferable. Additional work in the Reading and Writing Center (ENGLB 70 or 75) may be advised.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Deepen knowledge of general academic and discipline-specific vocabulary and concepts.
  • Apply knowledge of structural analysis and contextual analysis to unknown words
  • SLO #2: Differentiate among topics, stated/implied main ideas, major/minor supporting details, and text structures in college level essays and articles
  • Create detailed outlines and summaries for essays and articles
  • Interpret the meaning of analogies encountered, analyzing comparisons, relationships and inferences
  • SLO #3: Select suitable critical reading/metacognitive reading strategies to construct meaning and self-regulate comprehension and learning
  • Assess proper strategies to regulate reading rate for reader-specified purpose and college reading level
  • Demonstrate fluency in complex and extended texts appropriate to college reading level
  • SLO #4: Develop and apply analytical and critical reasoning skills in a variety of college level texts
  • Research and assess various forms of propaganda, assumptions, faulty analogies, non-sequiturs, deductive and inductive patterns, and argument
  • SLO# 5: Critically evaluate the logic of the arguments in college level texts
  • Apply skills of making inferences, distinguishing fact and opinion.
  • Recognize generalization.
  • Appraise an author’s purpose, tone, bias, and point of view in college level texts

ENGRD 311 Intensive Critical Thinking for College Success

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 59 or ENGWR 58 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course emphasizes the theory and application of critical thinking through reading expository, argumentative, fictional and nonfictional literature and works to develop the following: critical and analytical reading skills for college-level text, critical and analytical evaluation in research, synthesizing information to form logical conclusions, comparing and evaluating multiple sources, application in critical reading strategies across the discipline, vocabulary development and expansion for college-level reading. This accelerated course is for students who are ready for the challenge of an intensive learning experience at college level. This course meets the Reading Competency requirement for AA and AS degrees and is CSU transferable.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Read actively.
  • Employ proper reading strategies during pre-reading, reading and post-reading stages such as surveying, defining purpose of reading, predicting, asking guide questions, annotating, highlighting, constructing outlines, and writing summaries.
  • SLO #2 Demonstrate and deepen vocabulary development techniques.
  • Understand common word parts and spelling rules.
  • Apply knowledge of contextual analysis and structural analysis in decoding unknown words.
  • Establish adequate vocabulary capacity in specialized terminology for college-level text.
  • SLO #3 Construct critical reading and thinking skills to evaluate the logic of arguments in college-level texts.
  • Differentiate between facts, opinions, informed opinions, and use of deceptive language in arguments and persuasion.
  • Identify author's tone, purpose, issue, claim and conclusion in a nonfiction work.
  • Evaluate author's evidence, bias, clarification and credibility to draw logical and reasonable conclusion.
  • SLO #4 Develop and apply analytical and critical reasoning skills in a variety of college level texts.
  • Research and assess various forms of propaganda, assumptions, faulty analogies, non-sequiturs, deductive and inductive patterns, and argument
  • Synthesize information to draw logical and reasonable conclusion about written text.
  • Understand multiple sources of information on a topic in order to compare and contrast concepts.
  • SLO #5 Select suitable critical reading/metacognitive reading strategies to construct meaning and self-regulate comprehension and learning.
  • Demonstrate fluency in complex and extended texts appropriate to college reading level.
  • Assess proper strategies to regulate reading rate for reader-defined purpose in college reading level text.

ENGRD 312 Academic Textbook Reading

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGLB 70, ENGLB 75, ENGWR 101, or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course refines students' skills and ability to read, understand, and respond to college-level textbooks across the curriculum. Emphasis is placed on discipline-based vocabulary, critical reading and thinking strategies, interpretation of visual aids and data, and employing appropriate reading rate to fulfill the purpose of reading. This course meets the Reading Competency requirement for the A.A. and A.S. degrees, and is CSU transferable. Students are encouraged to also enroll in ENGLB 70 or 75 for access to individualized help in the Reading and Writing Center.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Apply the principles of textbook reading
  • Interpret graphs, figures, data presentations, and recognize textbooks' learning aids.
  • Examine schema; develop and expand vocabulary using context clues, word parts; and establish specialized and technical terms.
  • SLO #2 Evaluate textbook materials
  • Adapt critical reading strategies to construct new material in various reading environments across the discipline as a critical and analytical thinker.
  • Evaluate and analyze reading material to make connections between the new and existing information.
  • SLO #3 Use writing as a learning tool
  • Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of reading material through academic writing.
  • Express personal opinions and validate facts about various types of reading material in academic writing.
  • SLO #4 Employ reading rates
  • Correlate, define, and apply appropriate reading rates for academic reading across the disciplines.
  • Modify reading rate flexibility to meet the purpose of reading.
  • SLO #5 Synthesize new information
  • Synthesize and create new information obtained from reading material in writing, discussion, or presentation.
  • Draw relevant conclusions about new information in various reading environments.
  • SLO #6 Adapt critical reading strategies
  • Analyze the author's tone, attitude, purpose, and thesis.
  • Formulate questions and make judgments about reading material.
  • Associate background knowledge and personal experience with new information.
  • Recognize fallacies in logic and reasoning.
  • SLO #7 Analyze and relate all above objectives to courses taught throughout the disciplines

ENGRD 495 Independent Studies in English - Reading

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

English - Writing (ENGWR)

ENGWR 44 Basics of Sentence Structure

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers training in grammar, sentence building, correct usage, and punctuation. This course is recommended for students who wish to review basic principles of standard English as preparation or reinforcement of developmental writing for ENGWR 58 or ENGWR 101 or college composition for ENGWR 300. Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • IDENTIFY AND COMPOSE GRAMMAR AND USAGE OF STANDARD ENGLISH AT A PROFICIENT LEVEL OF BASIC WRITING (SLO #1).
  • Recognize, identify, compose and apply sentence building, correct usage, and punctuation at a basic level of writing in Standard English.
  • Identify and apply basic Standard English usage in terms of sentence components, pronoun agreement, pronoun usage, modifiers, parallelism, shifts, conciseness, sentence combining, and capitalization.
  • Demonstrate consistent control of the conventions of punctuation, spelling, capitalization, and grammar within written paragraphs.

ENGWR 51 Developmental Writing

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

ENGWR 51 prepares students for ENGWR 101 through a focus on reading and writing as integrally related skills. Students will study and practice reading comprehension, the writing process, and critical thinking through the development of clear and correct sentences. Students will also develop the skills necessary to write a variety of focused, developed, organized paragraphs and essays. Students will be responsible for writing at least six full-process essays. The course may include a departmental final or portfolio assessment.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE WRITING PROCESS TO ACHIEVE VARIOUS PURPOSES THROUGH WRITING (SLO #1).
  • Objective A: Demonstrate knowledge of the writing process, including prewriting, drafting, outlining, revising, and editing/proofreading.
  • COMPREHEND AND THINK CRITICALLY ABOUT PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN TEXTS (SLO #2).
  • Objective A: Practice reading comprehension skills of note-taking, differentiating between main idea and support, drawing appropriate inferences, and analysis of style and organization of expository texts.
  • COMPOSE FULLY DEVELOPED, LOGICALLY STRUCTURED PARAGRAPHS AND SHORT ESSAYS (SLO #3).
  • Objective A: Practice writing focused paragraphs and essays with clear topic sentences/thesis statements and appropriate support.
  • Objective B: Practice coherence and unity in paragraphs and essays through planned organization and the use of transitions.
  • RECOGNIZE AND BEGIN TO APPLY THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH (SLO #4).
  • Objective A: Use correct capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
  • Objective B: Recognize and correct major sentence errors in his/her own writing, such as fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • Objective C: Practice writing timed essays with a focus on applying standard written English skills.

ENGWR 55 Fluency and Style in English Writing

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers further training in grammar, sentence building, correct usage, and punctuation. Students focus on developing fluency and style through sentence combining. Recommended for students who wish to continue to develop their understanding of standard English as preparation or reinforcement for ENGWR 101 or ENGWR 300. This course is graded on a credit/no credit basis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EMPLOY DIFFERENT SENTENCE PATTERNS IN HIS/HER WRITING (SLO #1).
  • Write sentences that indicate relationships between ideas.
  • Write sentences that achieve variety in his/her writing.
  • IDENTIFY STYLISTIC DEVICES IN THE WRITING OF OTHERS (SLO #2).
  • Identify sentence patterns, such as subordination and coordination.
  • Identify stylistic devices, such as participles and appositives.
  • RECOGNIZE AND BEGIN TO APPLY THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH (SLO #3).
  • Write clear and correct sentences.
  • Use correct capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
  • Use knowledge of different sentence patterns to recognize and correct major sentence errors in his/her own writing, such as fragments and run-on sentences.

ENGWR 58 Writing Development with Reading

  • Same As:ENGRD 59
  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 19 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The focus of this course will be on writing and reading instruction as integrally related skills. Students will study and practice reading comprehension in the context of the writing process with the goal of accelerating the pathway to the English Reading and English Writing requirements. Students will develop critical thinking skills and the ability to write clear and correct sentences as they write a variety of focused, developed, organized paragraphs and essays. Students will write both full-process and in-class essays. This course may include a departmental final or portfolio assessment. Successful completion of this course will serve as a prerequisite for ENGWR 101 and ENGRD 110 only at Cosumnes River College. As enrollment into course will be based upon prerequisite, there will be no self-placement. This course is the same as ENGRD 59, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Comprehend, think critically, and respond appropriately in writing to a variety of professionally written non-fiction and fiction texts. (SLO 1)
  • Use context to determine the meanings of words and to interpret the meaning behind a variety of non-fiction and fiction texts.
  • Differentiate between main ideas and support details in a variety of non-fiction texts.
  • Develop written responses with clearly stated main ideas/thesis statements and appropriate support details (including facts and supported opinions developed through careful critical thinking) when responding to a variety of non-fiction and fiction texts.
  • Identify implied meanings and formulate appropriate conclusions in reading a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Identify and analyze basic organizational patterns in a variety of expository texts (e.g., generalization-example, cause-effect, and comparison-contrast).
  • Compose fully developed, logically structured paragraphs and essays using the stages of pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing.(SLO 2)
  • Achieve coherence and unity in essay form with planned organization and the use of transitions.
  • Achieve various purposes through writing.
  • Develop text with thoughtful, focused thesis statements, relevant topic sentences, specific examples and details.
  • Develop skill and confidence in writing timed essays.
  • Recognize and begin to apply the conventions of standard written English. (SLO 3)
  • Identify standard written English conventions in a variety of written texts.
  • Write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
  • Recognize and correct major sentence errors in one’s own writing, such as fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • Use word processor for composition and revision.

ENGWR 99 English Summer Bridge Program

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:20 hours LEC; 21 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is a writing and grammar course that is part lecture and part lab. Students will focus on reading and writing as integrally related skills, hone their reading and writing processes, and practice grammar and sentence formation--all to become more college ready. This course is recommended for students who wish to review basic principles of standard English and practice college-level writing for ENGWR 51, ENGWR 101 or ENGWR 300. The course is graded on a pass/no pass basis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the writing process to achieve various purposes through writing (SLO #1)
  • Comprehend and analyze various professionally written texts (SLO #2)
  • Compose fully developed, logically structured paragraphs and short essays (SLO #3)
  • Recognize and begin to apply the conventions of standard written English (SLO #4)
  • Feel more comfortable in a college-level setting
  • Feel more confident about writing skills and ability to succeed at the college level

ENGWR 101 College Writing

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 59, ENGWR 51, or ENGWR 58 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on the connections between critical thinking, writing, and reading that are necessary for the independent development of essays in ENGWR 300 and other transfer-level courses. It emphasizes writing in response to various reading selections, including at least one full-length work. The essay writing process includes prewriting, thesis development and organization of ideas, drafting of essays, and revision. The course also requires outside research and includes an introduction to basic formatting and referencing of sources using MLA-style documentation. Students will write a minimum of four full-process essays totaling at least 4500 words.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • READ ANALYTICALLY AND THINK CRITICALLY ABOUT PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN TEXTS (SLO #1).
  • Annotate written texts.
  • Select ideas from written texts by using current methods to accurately incorporate the ideas of others into his or her writing where appropriate.
  • Identify the organizational structure of professional essays.
  • Summarize texts.
  • DEMONSTRATE PROFICIENCY WITH WRITING AS A PROCESS THAT INCLUDES PREWRITING, DRAFTING, AND REVISING BY COMPOSING UNIFIED, STRUCTURED, DEVELOPED ESSAYS (SLO #2).
  • Accomplish various purposes through writing.
  • Organize written texts logically.
  • Write focused, thoughtful thesis statements.
  • Achieve coherence and unity in writing at three levels: sentence, paragraph, and essay.
  • SUPPORT OPINIONS AND CONCLUSIONS USING SUFFICIENT EVIDENCE, INCORPORATING THE IDEAS OF OTHERS WHERE APPROPRIATE (SLO #3).
  • Incorporate sources effectively in writing.
  • Construct a simple argument in writing that gives reasons to support a claim.
  • Adequately develop texts with specific examples and detail.
  • CONSTRUCT SENTENCES THAT DEMONSTRATE CONTROL OF GRAMMAR, SENTENCE VARIETY, WORD CHOICE, AND CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH (SLO #4).
  • Use clear and somewhat varied sentences to write relatively error-free prose.

ENGWR 108 Accelerated College Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or 58 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:ENGWR 300
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides intensive instruction and practice in the critical thinking and writing skills necessary for success in college composition. Assignments are often connected to the students' assignments in ENGWR 300. The course includes the drafting, revision, and editing processes as well as instruction in critical thinking, reading comprehension, grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE PROFICIENCY WITH WRITING AS A PROCESS THAT INCLUDES PREWRITING, DRAFTING, AND REVISING BY COMPOSING UNIFIED, STRUCTURED, DEVELOPED ESSAYS (SLO#1):
  • employ a recursive writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing;
  • compose fully developed, structured, coherent, and unified essays;
  • CONSTRUCT SENTENCES THAT DEMONSTRATE CONTROL OF GRAMMAR, SENTENCE VARIETY, WORD CHOICE, AND CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH (SLO#2):
  • identify and correct sentence errors (especially sentence fragments, comma-splices and run-on sentences, subject-verb disagreement, incorrect verb tense and form, punctuation, pronoun
  • READ ANALYTICALLY AND THINK CRITICALLY ABOUT PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN TEXTS (SLO#3):
  • summarize, analyze, and respond to college-level texts;
  • incorporate the ideas of others into writing and demonstrate competence in MLA formatting and in-text citing.

ENGWR 109 Reading and Writing Skills for College

  • Same As:ENGRD 113
  • Units:4.5
  • Hours:72 hours LEC; 27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 59 or ENGWR 58 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This integrated reading and writing course is designed to accelerate the preparation for college reading and writing competency requirement for students who are assessed into one level below transfer English courses. This course prepares students for ENGRD 310/312 and ENGWR 300 with integrated teaching and learning in both reading and writing to accelerate a pathway for English Reading and Writing requirements. Students will learn to develop reading skills in vocabulary expansion, unlocking meanings with context clues and word parts, increasing comprehension, SQ3R, and critical thinking. Students will also learn to develop skills in writing correct, clear, and concise sentences with proper English grammar that transfer to well developed and organized paragraphs and essays. Other skills include paraphrasing, summarizing, pre-reading and pre-writing techniques, revising and editing essays, analyzing and comparing ideas, identifying author’s tone, bias, and purpose. This course is most ideal for students who are assessed into both ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 101. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have met the prerequisite for ENGRD 310/312 and ENGWR 300. This course may include a departmental final. This course is the same as ENGRD 113, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1 Demonstrate proficiency with reading and writing as a process that includes pre-reading/writing, reading/drafting, and post-reading and writing.
  • Objective 1A: Annotate written texts.
  • Objective 1B: Identify organizational thought patterns in various styles of text.
  • Objective 1C: Make predictions before reading and adjust them while reading.
  • Objective 1D: Assess prior knowledge and personal experience through brainstorming, asking questions, and free write to make association with written texts.
  • Objective 1E: Construct summaries and outlines of written texts.
  • SLO #2 Demonstrate proficiency in composing and recognizing coherent sentences, paragraphs, and essays in proper English grammar in various reading materials and writing tasks.
  • Objective 2A: Understand parts of speech and apply the understanding in writing.
  • Objective 2B: Establish and expand specialized vocabulary and choose the appropriate words to express ideas.
  • Objective 2C: Use clear and varied sentences in writing with proper punctuation, capitalization, and word form.
  • Objective 2D: Develop error-free prose and recognize common errors in spelling in different styles of writing.
  • Objective 2E: Achieve coherence and unity in writing with a focused and logical thesis statement.
  • Objective 2F: Organize evidence and examples to support ideas in a logical manner that fits the style of writing and fulfill the purpose of writing.
  • SLO #3 Construct and demonstrate critical thinking skills through analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing and through applying appropriate reading and writing strategies.
  • Objective 3A: Differentiate between facts, opinions, and informed opinions to interpret author’s tone and point of view.
  • Objective 3B: Draw proper conclusions and make effective evaluation upon examining factual information and implied messages in the text.
  • Objective 3C: Construct arguments in writing and provide evidence to support a claim.
  • Objective 3D: Incorporate and integrate multiple outside sources adequately and properly in writing.
  • Objective 3E: Adapt various reading techniques to accommodate reading rates.
  • Objective 3F: Follow MLA format in citing various sources when writing to respond to reading.
  • SLO #4 Apply appropriate comprehension strategies using effective and sufficient techniques in various reading materials and reflect such skills in written communication.
  • Objective 4A: Implement and apply SQ3R (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review) technique.
  • Objective 4B: Employ dictionary skills, structural analysis, and context clues to define unknown words.
  • Objective 4C: Understand the meaning of commonly used prefixes, roots, and suffixes.
  • Objective 4D: Use concept map to organize information that reflects comprehension of written texts.
  • Objective 4E: Employ effective highlighting skills.
  • Objective 4F: Apply, analyze and organize primary and secondary sources to synthesize ideas.
  • SLO #5 Apply study skills.
  • Objective 5A: Use annotation, highlighting, summarizing, outlining, and mapping to comprehend, evaluate, and analyze written texts.
  • Objective 5B: Employ proper time management skills to organize the process of assignment completion.

ENGWR 110 College Reading and Writing Skills

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This pre-transfer-level course is designed to prepare students for success in ENGWR 300 and other courses that require writing. Students will read primarily transfer-level non-fiction texts of varying length, and write essays responding to and incorporating these readings. The course will focus on reading and writing fundamentals, such as active reading strategies, writing process, thesis development, paragraph structure, logical support, and sentence awareness.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Comprehend, think critically, and respond appropriately in writing to a variety of professionally written non-fiction and fiction texts. (SLO 1)
  • Use context to determine the meanings of words and to interpret the meaning behind a variety of non-fiction and fiction texts.
  • Differentiate between main ideas and support details in a variety of non-fiction texts.
  • Develop written responses with clearly stated main ideas/thesis statements and appropriate support details (including facts and supported opinions developed through careful critical thinking) when responding to a variety of non-fiction and fiction texts.
  • Identify implied meanings and formulate appropriate conclusions in reading a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts.
  • Identify and analyze basic organizational patterns in a variety of expository texts (e.g., generalization-example, cause-effect, and comparison-contrast).
  • Compose fully developed, logically structured paragraphs and essays using the stages of pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing.(SLO 2)
  • Achieve coherence and unity in essay form with planned organization and the use of transitions.
  • Achieve various purposes through writing.
  • Develop text with thoughtful, focused thesis statements, relevant topic sentences, specific examples and details.
  • Develop skill and confidence in writing timed essays.
  • Recognize and begin to apply the conventions of standard written English. (SLO 3)
  • Identify standard written English conventions in a variety of written texts.
  • Write clear and correct sentences using correct capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
  • Recognize and correct major sentence errors in one’s own writing, such as fragments, run-on sentences, subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement and references.
  • Use a computer for composition and revision.

ENGWR 300 College Composition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process. Grade of "C" or better required to meet prerequisite.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A2; IGETC Area 1A
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers instruction in critical thinking, reading and writing, and is designed to help the student demonstrate, in both argumentative and expository prose, sound logic and/or argumentation, clear organization, precise diction, and appropriate style. Throughout the course, fluency and correctness are emphasized.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • COMPOSE EFFECTIVE COLLEGE-LEVEL ESSAYS USING A VARIETY OF RHETORICAL STRATEGIES AND APPLYING APPROPRIATE CITATIONS AND FORMATTING STANDARDS (SLO #1).
  • Use pre-writing, drafting, revision, and editing/proofreading to create essays.
  • Write focused, thoughtful thesis statements.
  • Support opinions in writing through careful, critical thinking.
  • Adequately develop essays using a variety of approaches, such as comparison/contrast, classification, definition, narration, description, causal analysis.
  • Construct a logical argument in writing that deals with the opposition and gives reasons to support a claim.
  • Achieve coherence and unity in writing at three levels: sentence, paragraph, and essay.
  • Organize written texts logically without dependence on formulaic prescriptions.
  • RESEARCH, EVALUATE, AND SYNTHESIZE SOURCES TO SUPPORT A THESIS (SLO #2).
  • Use MLA documentation format correctly.
  • Summarize, paraphrase, and directly quote outside sources as support for his or her ideas.
  • Research and incorporate sources effectively and meaningfully in writing.
  • CRITICALLY ANALYZE, COMPARE, AND EVALUATE VARIOUS COMPLEX WORKS (SLO #3).
  • Annotate and analyze written texts and respond thoughtfully to them.
  • Analyze and evaluate the 3-fold rhetorical concerns of audience, writer, and message in written texts.
  • Effectively critique his or her own and other student writing.
  • APPLY THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH EMPLOYING A VARIETY OF SENTENCE STRUCTURES AND COLLEGE-LEVEL DICTION (SLO #4).
  • Use clear and varied sentences to write error-free prose.

ENGWR 301 College Composition and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300, ENGWR 480, ESLW 340, or HONOR 375 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area A3; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 1B; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 105; C-ID ENGL 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

ENGWR 301 offers the study of literature, with an emphasis on analytical reading and writing. It covers principles of argument and analysis, such as reasoning inductively and deductively. Assigned readings may include novels, short stories, poems, plays, and literary criticism. Essays written for the course (6,000 words minimum) generalize from the texts to present carefully reasoned arguments. At least one essay includes citations from secondary sources, documented according to current MLA format.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE THE ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NECESSARY TO FUNCTION SUCCESSFULLY AND COMPLETELY AT THE UNIVERSITY LEVEL (SLO 1, P-SLO 1)
  • analyze the cultural and historical contexts of literary works.
  • analyze literature through various critical approaches.
  • evaluate works of literature by applying literary elements, terms, and theoretical concepts.
  • compare and contrast artistic and literary movements across a range of time periods as well as the connections between major literary works.
  • think and write critically about literary works in a variety of poetic and narrative forms from several periods and various cultures.
  • RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF VARIOUS MODES OF COMMUNICATION AND THE NEED TO USE THIS KNOWLEDGE RESPONSIBLY (SLO 2, P-SLO 2)
  • demonstrate an ability to correlate literature with other fields of study and to recognize the power to literature as a humanizing force.
  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS (SLO 3, P-SLO 3)
  • reason inductively from examples, patterns, and structures to form generalizations.
  • reason deductively by recognizing literary and linguistic conventions, whether structural, semantic, or syntactical and draw conclusions about texts based on those conventions.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN A MYRIAD OF RHETORICAL SITUATIONS (SLO 4, P-SLO 4)
  • identify premises, both explicitly and implicitly stated.
  • distinguish among facts, inferences, assumptions, and implications.
  • recognize fallacious reasoning, including but not limited to the standard critical thinking fallacies, in various critical interpretations of literary works (including the students' own interpretations) and respond to (and correct, if necessary) these fallacies.
  • compare opposing interpretations by literary scholars.
  • OBTAIN THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES (SLO 5, P-SLO 5)
  • propose a thesis-driven argument of interpretation or evaluation and support it with textual evidence, using a sufficient variety and number of appropriate examples.
  • support the thesis with a sufficient number and variety of appropriate examples from both primary and secondary texts, taking into account alternate and opposing points of view.
  • construct logical discourse through order, repetition, and transitional devices.
  • use diction appropriate to the audience and the rhetorical purpose of writing.
  • use elements of style with increasing complexity (such as absolute phrases or repetition) to achieve coherence.

ENGWR 302 Advanced Composition and Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 105
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for students who have had ENGWR 300 and who desire further instruction in the techniques of effective critical thinking as expressed in written argument and in the major principles of advanced composition and rhetoric.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • PREPARE STUDENTS TO BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO#1, PSLO#3)
  • write effective precis and responses, stance/position papers, proposals, evaluations and analyses of cause in which they demonstrate an understanding of the diction and structural differences between the Upper, Middle and Lower styles in English, and demonstrate an ability to determine which of these styles is appropriate to the tone, purpose and audience of their essay; demonstrate an ability to use the advanced principles of clarity (agent-action-goal) and coherence (concatenation, focus maintenance, clear orientation and subject control), concision and emphasis to develop more sophisticated writing skills appropriate to upper-division college essays; demonstrate a highly-developed ability to use the thoughts, facts, and experiences of other to support their own assertions effectively and to cite those thoughts, facts and experiences when appropriate to the Upper Middle Style, including but not limited to the use of tropes and schemes and the use of syntactic symbolism; demonstrate the ability to limit the topic appropriately to a scope that can be developed appropriately in the length of the composition; demonstrate an ability to select examples details, data and other evidence to support the validate the thesis and other generalization; demonstrate (in taking stances or criticizing the arguments of others) an ability to rephrase written argument accurately, producing a faithful distillation of the central meaning of the text or the writer’s ostensible intention; demonstrate a clear awareness of the specific audience of the essay and of any special limitations or opportunities imposed or provided by the rhetorical situation, and demonstrate an ability to respond to those limitations and opportunities appropriately by adjusting the arguments and the language of the essay appropriately.
  • ENABLE STUDENTS TO DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO#2, PSLO#4)
  • read analytically and evaluate ideas in focused class discussion and in written techniques, read competing points of view of subjects and determine their own stances on the subjects and be able to express those stances logically and effectively, demonstrating an ability to identify and state the main idea, thesis or unifying theme in expository or argumentative discourse; to point out instances of inferential reasoning and deductive and inductive logic; to distinguish between opinion, judgment and what may be taken as a fact, and to describe an appropriate process of verification in establishing whether an utterance is factual or not; to recognize and articulate assumptions (including unstated assumptions) in an argument; to draw and justify inferences made about the intention of the writer based on observations of the writer’s diction and style (e.g., tone, persona and metaphor); to point out logical fallacies or slanted or propagandist use of language.
  • ASSIST STUDENTS IN OBTAINING THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES. (SLO#3, PSLO#5)
  • demonstrate more sophisticated structure, coherence and emphasis; demonstrate their understanding of the elements of style, with particular emphasis placed on the role of grammar as an element of style; demonstrate an understanding of some of the principles of classical rhetoric and of the Upper Middle Style found in most American journals-of-record; demonstrate an understanding of opposing viewpoints on issues and to develop their own stances on those issues; and demonstrate an ability to argue cogently in a number of modes, including but not limited to making proposals, making evaluation and position the existence of causal relationships.

ENGWR 309 Documenting Research for College Composition

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:LIBR 318
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Learn to add credibility and to avoid plagiarism in your writing as you explore the principles and mechanics of documenting research while developing critical thinking skills. The final product of the course is a well-researched argumentative essay that shows mastery of the documentation style guidelines of the Modern Language Association of America (MLA).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BECOME SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS. (SLO #1, P-SLO #3)
  • Write a researched argumentative essay in which the parenthetical references correctly follow MLA guidelines.
  • Evaluate Internet sites for their credibility in academic research.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS. (SLO #2, P-SLO #4)
  • Use basic argumentative principles such as providing reasons with grounds, backing up assumptions underlying reasons, and dealing with the opposition.
  • Use the Internet to find credible sources to support a research paper.
  • OBTAIN THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES. (SLO #3, P-SLO #5)
  • Distinguish between quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing and using each method of textual reference in a research paper.
  • Use the college library's full text databases to find current research on a given topic.
  • RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF VARIOUS MODES OF COMMUNICATION AND THE NEED TO USE THIS KNOWLEDGE RESPONSIBLY. (SLO #4, P-SLO #2)
  • Create a works cited page that documents at least 10 different kinds of sources compiled for a research paper.

ENGWR 330 Writing for Publication

  • Same As:JOUR 340
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300, ENGWR 480, HONOR 375, or JOUR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This is an introductory course in writing nonfiction for publication. Emphasis will be on developing magazine articles that sell; finding ideas; analyzing magazines; writing query letters; researching and interviewing; organizing, writing and illustrating articles. Individual and class criticism of student work will be featured. This course is the same as JOUR 340, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • BE SELF-RELIANT, EVALUATIVE READERS AND WRITERS, ABLE TO USE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS TO READ AND WRITE EFFECTIVELY IN ACADEMIC AND WORKPLACE SETTINGS (SLO #1; PSLO #3).
  • Identify and define topics for possible publication.
  • Collect, analyze, and evaluate information synthesizing and developing conclusions.
  • Demonstrate research, writing, and marketing skills to find the most appropriate print or online publications to market articles.
  • Become aware of audience and focus articles toward a particular print or online publication.
  • DEVELOP THE NECESSARY READING AND WRITING SKILLS FOR UNIVERSITY-LEVEL COURSES (SLO #2; PSLO #5).
  • Select and organize information from various sources effectively.
  • Compose, edit, and illustrate salable articles for print and online publication.
  • DEVELOP ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS, TO UTILIZE READING AND WRITING PROCESSES, TO FIND AND COMPREHEND INFORMATION, AND TO APPLY THAT KNOWLEDGE IN MYRIAD RHETORICAL SITUATIONS (SLO #3; PSLO #4).
  • Conduct interviews and research to collect, evaluate, and synthesize information.
  • Assess and select ideas for articles and books.
  • RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF VARIOUS MODES OF COMMUNICATION AND THE NEED TO USE THIS KNOWLEDGE RESPONSIBLY (SLO #4; PSLO #2).
  • Analyze both print and online publications for appropriateness and timeliness of proposed articles.
  • OBTAIN THE ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE NECESSARY TO FUNCTION SUCCESSFULLY AND COMPLETELY AT THE UNIVERSITY, IN THE WORKPLACE, AND IN DIVERSE CULTURAL SETTINGS (SLO #5; PSLO #1).
  • Develop interview techniques.

ENGWR 331 Writing for Publication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 330
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers a marketing approach to selling nonfiction writing. The course surveys consumer, general interest and specialty magazines, including trade journals, company publications, regional magazines and local markets. Activities will include the following: reporting on magazine categories; analysis of a variety of magazine article styles and types; writing and sending articles to the marketplace; individual and class criticism of student manuscripts. Emphasis will be placed on increasing freelance writing publication. The course may be taken twice for credit, with the understanding that many universities and four-year colleges place a nine-unit limit on transfer credit from advanced composition courses (ENGWR 330, 331 and ENGCW 400).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • review selling procedures, writing an effective query, and writing as a business.
  • understand and apply techniques for increasing freelance production and sales through multiple submissions to the magazine marketplace.
  • examine consumer, general interest, specialty, local and international magazines.
  • mail out query letters and manuscripts on schedule.
  • gain hands-on experience using computers to research and write articles.
  • develop writing and editing skills.
  • develop oral presentation and interpersonal skills.
  • develop critical thinking skills; identifying and defining problems or issues; collecting analyzing, and evaluating information; synthesizing and developing conclusions.
  • gain personal satisfaction through preparing work for publication.

ENGWR 341 Introduction to Technical and Professional Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course emphasizes principles of reader-centered writing for the workplace, focusing specifically on aspects of technical and professional writing. The course teaches the writing of documents used in industry and business. These documents may include memos, letters, brochures, reports, process analyses, technical descriptions, procedures, proposals, grants, scientific reports, web sites, software documentation, and case studies. The course may include team projects that require collaboration outside the classroom. The course complements communication skills needed for the division of Career and Technical Education. The course is intended to be applicable to AS and AA CTE degrees.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • IDENTIFY THE VARIOUS FORMS OF TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION, INCLUDING THE AUDIENCES TO WHOM THEY ARE FOCUSED (SLO#1).
  • Analyze a variety of document formats with regards to audience and purpose.
  • Propose writing solutions to fill information needs.
  • Compose documents suited for the appropriate audience.
  • Revise professional documentation based on audience feedback.
  • RESEARCH, EVALUATE, AND SYNTHESIZE SOURCES TO SUPPORT A PROPOSAL OR HYPOTHESIS (SLO#2).
  • Collect and evaluate technical and organizational information.
  • Compose documents by incorporating summary, paraphrase, and direct quotations as support for the writer's ideas and correctly using Council of Science Editors (CSE) or American Psychological Association (APA) style to format and cite.
  • DESIGN, CREATE AND COMPOSE DOCUMENTS DEPENDENT ON PURPOSE AND SITUATION (SLO#3).
  • Design documents to make content visually appealing and accessible through highlighting, headings, subheading, bulleting, and visual aids.
  • Compose documents persuasively to convince the audience by arousing interest, supporting points with research, refuting opposing points, writing ethically by documenting sources and reviewing for accuracy.
  • Incorporate the rhetorical appeals of ethos, logos, and pathos in written communication.
  • Avoid logical fallacies when communicating persuasively.
  • Use various communication channels including social media, routine correspondence, electronic communication, sales letters, brochures, and flyers to market services and products.

ENGWR 480 Honors College Composition

  • Same As:HONOR 375
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A2; IGETC Area 1A
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers the honors student a challenging course that will develop skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing. It asks students to critically analyze, compare, and evaluate various complex works. The course is designed to help students demonstrate, in both argumentative and expository prose, complex critical thinking, effective organization, precise diction, and sophisticated style; at least one of those essays requires research and appropriate MLA documentation. Essays written during the term will total at least 8,000 words. Throughout the course, fluency and correctness are emphasized. This course is not open to students who have successfully passed ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340. This course is the same as HONOR 375. This course, under either name, may be taken one time for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • COMPOSE CAREFULLY REASONED AND STYLISTICALLY SOPHISTICATED COLLEGE-LEVEL ESSAYS USING A VARIETY OF RHETORICAL STRATEGIES AND APPLYING APPROPRIATE CITATIONS AND FORMATTING STANDARDS (SLO #1; PSLO #1; Honors Prog.SLO # 1 and #5).
  • Use pre-writing, drafting, revision, and editing/proofreading to create essays.
  • Write focused, thoughtful thesis statements.
  • Support opinions in writing through careful, critical thinking.
  • Compose stylistically sophisticated essays using a variety of approaches, such as comparison/contrast, classification, definition, narration, description, causal analysis.
  • Construct a carefully reasoned argument in writing that considers audience and opposition.
  • Build coherence and unity in writing at three levels: sentence, paragraph, and essay.
  • Organize written texts logically and creatively without dependence on formulaic prescriptions.
  • APPLY COMPLEX CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS BY DEFINING ISSUES AS WELL AS RESEARCHING, EVALUATING, AND SYNTHESIZING SOURCES TO SUPPORT A THESIS (SLO #2; PSLO #2 and PSLO #3; Honors Prog. SLO # 3 and #4).
  • Appraise and use a variety of research techniques.
  • Evaluate sources.
  • Research and incorporate sources effectively and meaningfully in writing.
  • Summarize, paraphrase, and directly quote outside sources as support for his or her ideas and/or represent a belief held by the opposition.
  • Use MLA documentation format correctly.
  • CRITICALLY ANALYZE, COMPARE, AND EVALUATE VARIOUS COMPLEX WORKS (SLO #3; PSLO#4; Honors Prog. SLO #2 and #5).
  • Annotate and analyze complex written texts and respond thoughtfully to them.
  • Analyze and evaluate the 3-fold rhetorical concerns of audience, writer, and message in written texts.
  • Question an author's claim and support.
  • Critique his or her own and other student writing.
  • APPLY THE CONVENTIONS OF STANDARD WRITTEN ENGLISH EMPLOYING A VARIETY OF SENTENCE STRUCTURES AND COLLEGE-LEVEL DICTION (SLO #4; PSLO #5; Honors Prog. SLO #1).
  • Use clear and varied sentences to demonstrate overall mastery of the conventions of standard written English.
  • Analyze his or her own and other student style and diction.

ENGWR 495 Independent Studies in English - Writing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.