Communication Studies

Communication (COMM)

COMM 301 Introduction to Public Speaking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course prepares students to speak in a variety of rhetorical situations: as college students, as employees, as opinion leaders in the community. The course is designed to assist students in developing effective delivery, ethical research methodology, analytical thinking and listening skills, organization and outlining skills, and appropriate presentation skills. Emphasis is on researching, preparing, organizing, and presenting a variety of speeches for different audiences. Videotaping equipment may be used as an aid to the student’s self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DESIGN AND RELATE MESSAGES CLEARLY FOR EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE ORAL COMMUNICATION (SLO#1).
  • Analyze an audience using age, gender, cultural variations, and other appropriate measures.
  • Design, deliver and differentiate a variety of speech types, including, at minimum, the speech to inform, to entertain or relate (within a special occasion), and to persuade.
  • Identify, evaluate and apply appropriate nonverbal techniques.
  • Design presentational aids, audio and/or visual, appropriate to the audience, message and context.
  • Recognize and respond to techniques for managing communication apprehension.
  • APPLY EFFECTIVE LISTENING SKILLS TO COMPREHEND SPOKEN MESSAGES, ANALYZE INFORMATION CRITICALLY AND CONSIDER MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES (SLO#2).
  • Demonstrate critical listening skills.
  • Recognize and model constructive feedback.
  • COMPOSE IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO#3).
  • Compose fully developed, structured, and unified oral presentations, including formal written outlines.
  • Locate, interpret and evaluate various research materials to accurately document sources (in oral and written form) according to a standard referencing style (MLA, APA, CBE, etc.).
  • ANALYZE AND FORMULATE CRITICAL THINKING WITHIN EVIDENCE AND REASONING OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO#4).
  • Assess, evaluate, and apply a variety of rhetorical strategies that are effective and appropriate per the purpose, occasion and audience.
  • Apply language techniques and strategies appropriate to the audience and occasion.
  • Arrange, paraphrase and effectively integrate evidence and/or supportive material into a presentation.
  • ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE'S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #5).
  • Recognize and apply ethical standards to the research, design and delivery of a message for an audience and occasion.

COMM 311 Argumentation and Debate

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to argumentation, critical evaluation of evidence, and reasoning in the context of debate. A series of writing assignments will focus on the skills of critical thinking, rhetoric, and the sophistication of argumentative skills. Intended as a practical course, the fundamentals of proposition analysis, case building and dissent are discussed and applied within written communication and oral presentation. Videotaping equipment may be used as an aid to the student’s self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • COMPOSE IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1).
  • Use advanced lower-division composition: essay structure, continuity, elements of style, grammar as a stylistic technique, clarity, coherence, concision, persuasive essay and sophisticated writing skills that consider the reader as audience.
  • Distinguish and evaluate the viability of different types of arguments.
  • Compose arguments cogently in a number of modes, including but not limited to making proposals (propositions), providing evaluation, and explanation of positions and the existence of causal, analogical, and/or correlation relationships.
  • ANALYZE AND FORMULATE CRITICAL THINKING WITHIN EVIDENCE AND REASONING OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #2).
  • Understand the nature of critical thinking and quality composition.
  • Apply the theoretical foundations for argument analysis and construction of induction, deduction, analysis, synthesis, sound reasoning, and fallacy identification within the readings and writing of debate cases and argumentative communication messages.
  • Differentiate the nature and function of argumentation in various communication contexts.
  • Assess rhetorical style differences and choose appropriate strategies for the composition of delivery of oral versus written argument.
  • Critique written and oral arguments using Aristotle’s classical structures of reasoning and contemporary elements of argument (such as Stephan Toulmin’s model).
  • Analyze competing points of views of subjects and determine the stances of the authors on the subjects as well as to express individual stances logically and effectively on the subjects.
  • DESIGN AND RELATE MESSAGES CLEARLY FOR EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE ORAL COMMUNICATION (SLO #3).
  • Argue for a position within the context and understanding of a specific debate format.
  • Design and present an affirmative and negative debate case clearly and effectively.
  • Use the library and online technologies to research debate topics and gather evidence to support negative and affirmative positions.
  • APPLY EFFECTIVE LISTENING SKILLS TO COMPREHEND SPOKEN MESSAGES, ANALYZE INFORMATION CRITICALLY AND CONSIDER MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES (SLO #4).
  • Consider the audience to establish common ground in the construction of affirmative and negative arguments.
  • Construct effective refutation to opposing viewpoints in a variety of debate formats.
  • Assess rhetorical style differences and choose appropriate strategies for the composition and delivery of oral and written messages.
  • ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE’S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #5).
  • Appreciate the importance of ethics in controversy.
  • Demonstrate ethical behavior in the research, construction and delivery of arguments.
  • Employ, evaluate and interpret various research materials to accurately document sources (in oral and written form) according to a standard referencing style (MLA, APA, CBE, etc.).
  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF COMMUNICATION STUDIES (SLO #6).
  • Define and identify various theoretical models of argumentation.
  • Identify messages within argumentation and rhetoric and their theoretical approaches as they exist in a variety of communication contexts (classical Aristotelian, cannons of rhetoric per Roman Oration, one-sided versus two sided messages, etc.).

COMM 315 Persuasion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course presents fundamental theories and techniques of persuasion as they occur in various communication contexts, including commercial, interpersonal, public and mass media. A series of writing assignments will focus on the skills of critical thinking, persuasion, and the sophistication of argumentative essay skills. Essays of advanced composition shall be evaluated for their quality in both critical thinking and composition. Theoretical models of critical thinking and communication studies shall be applied to rhetoric, examining message production, analyzing messages, and exploring the fields of electronic and print media, advertising (product campaign), political campaign strategy, and ideological campaign techniques for mass communication to consider the political, cultural and social impact of persuasion. Students explore ethical considerations of persuasive communication, learn about types of reasoning, and identify fallacious arguments as they occur in persuasion. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus. As HONOR 341 Persuasion within Social Issues has a similar basis as this course, this course is not open to a student that has received credit for HONOR 341.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • COMPOSE IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1).
  • Use advanced lower-division composition techniques that address essay structure, continuity, emphasis and subtlety, elements of style, grammar as stylistic technique, audience, and persuasive essay writing.
  • Apply the advanced use of clarity (agent-action-goal) and coherence (concentration, focus, maintenance, clear orientation and subject control), concision and emphasis to develop writing skills appropriate for a sophisticated style of English.
  • Compose arguments cogently in a number of modes, including but not limited to making proposals, providing evaluation, and explanation of positions and the existence of causal and/or correlation relationships.
  • ANALYZE AND FORMULATE CRITICAL THINKING WITHIN THE EVIDENCE AND REASONING OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #2).
  • Understand the nature of critical thinking and quality composition.
  • Apply the theoretical foundations for argument analysis, persuasion and essay construction of induction, deduction, analysis, synthesis, sound reasoning, and fallacy identification within the readings and writing of persuasive communication messages.
  • Analyze and respond to competing points of views to determine the stances of the authors on the subjects as well to express individual stances logically and effectively.
  • ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE'S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #3).
  • Employ critical thinking and writing skills in reflection about multi-cultural diversity issues, ethics, and politics in terms of the effectiveness and appropriateness of persuasive communication.
  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF COMMUNICATION STUDIES (SLO #4).
  • Analyze persuasive messages, including identifying and explaining the persuasive components or strategies used to effect change.
  • Identify persuasive strategies and their theoretical foundations as they exist in a variety of communication contexts (e.g., interpersonal compliance-gaining, commercial advertising, political rhetoric and campaigning, public speaking, mass media, etc.).
  • Differentiate between humanistic and social science approaches to persuasion.
  • Determine and evaluate criteria for the development of successful persuasive campaigns.

COMM 321 Interpersonal Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 51
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will explore and apply models and theories of interpersonal communication in a variety of personal and professional contexts. Using simulations and structured exercises, students will develop a deeper understanding of communication concepts associated with developing and maintaining satisfying interpersonal relationships. Additionally, students will focus on communication competency through a heightened awareness of the complexity of interpersonal communication during verbal and nonverbal transactions and the development of skills as both senders and receivers of shared messages. Video equipment may be used as an aid to the student’s self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION (SLO #1).
  • Evaluate various models of communication and explain how messages may be sent and received at both conscious and unconscious levels.
  • Explain salient characteristics of interpersonal and intrapersonal communication in relation to other communication contexts.
  • Identify stages of development and termination for interpersonal relationships.
  • Describe the characteristics, behaviors and attitudes of competent communicators and explain how competent communicators appropriately adapt messages to varied contexts.
  • ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE'S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #2).
  • Describe the importance that self-awareness and personal identities play in the development of satisfying interpersonal relationships and identify guidelines for strengthening one’s self-concept.
  • Explain the importance of emotional intelligence for satisfying interpersonal relationships.
  • Demonstrate ethical communication within the context of interpersonal relationships.
  • Define the characteristics of interpersonal conflict and identify strategies for effective communication during conflict.
  • APPLY EFFECTIVE LISTENING SKILLS TO COMPREHEND SPOKEN MESSAGES, ANALYZE INFORMATION AND CONSIDER MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES (SLO #3).
  • Analyze the process of human perception and describe the influence of various standpoints, such as culture and gender, on perception.
  • Demonstrate active listening through the use of mindfulness, paraphrasing, and non-defensive responses to criticism.
  • Delineate the difference between relational and literal meanings of interpersonal messages.

COMM 325 Intercultural Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (COMM 325, 331, 361 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the influence of culture on identity, perception, social organization, language and nonverbal messages in intercultural experiences in the United States. Variations and commonalities in communication patterns across cultures are examined as well as processes and outcomes among persons of different group-based experiential backgrounds. Practical application of factors which influence communication among individuals of different cultures is emphasized. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO 1: DEFINE, IDENTIFY, EXPLAIN AND APPLY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ASSOCIATED WITH THE STUDY OF INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION.
  • Identify and describe cultural taxonomies that explain cultural variation (Ex. Hall, Hofstede, Kluckhohn & Strodtbeck, etc.).
  • Differentiate the communication behaviors associated with high and low context cultures.
  • Define the importance of nonverbal communication in the overall communication process.
  • Analyze, interpret and critique the nonverbal messages in intercultural encounters and recommend possible approaches for clarifying misunderstandings that might be present.
  • Explain different theoretical perspectives on language and its relation to reality (Ex. Sapir Whorf hypothesis, Hiyakawa's abstraction ladder, Chomsky and "deep structures," etc.) and explain difficulties associated with the lack of equivalence in languages.
  • SLO 2: ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE'S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE, AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE.
  • Profile recent demographic trends in the United States and its impact upon cultural institutions.
  • Research and discuss the historical context for racism and prejudice in the United States.
  • Recognize and explain why statements in the analysis of a communication event may have a marginalizing effect.
  • Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of living in a diverse society.
  • SLO 3: IDENTIFY AND DEMONSTRATE COMMUNICATION SKILLS ASSOCIATED WITH INTERCULTURAL COMPETENCE.
  • Explain how to determine the extent to which a communication event may be considered intercultural.
  • Analyze and interpret a critical incident identifying areas of misunderstanding.
  • Analyze an intercultural situation and apply learned content regarding appropriate strategies related to interaction management and conflict management.
  • Define "culture shock" and describe strategies for reducing discomfort in culturally unfamiliar and/or ambiguous situations.
  • SLO 4: EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES.
  • Construct short answer essays that synthesize material from separate topic areas of the course.
  • Summarize ethnographic and/or database research that explore(s) a culture in the United States different from one's own perspective.

COMM 331 Group Discussion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (COMM 325, 331, 361 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to increase students’ understanding of group communication and to prepare students to function more effectively in various types of groups, as college students, employees, as members in the community. The course is designed to assist students in developing an understanding of how group communication is uniquely different from other communication. Oral communication techniques within group settings will be analyzed in depth and assignments will include informative and persuasive oral presentations (individual and group). The course will enhance students’ effectiveness in the small group dynamics of roles, functions, leadership and norms. Problem-solving and decision-making skills are emphasized through simulations and discussion. Group projects may require students to meet outside of class time for service learning or campus activities. Videotaping equipment may be used as an aid to the student’s self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DESIGN AND RELATE MESSAGES CLEARLY FOR EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE ORAL COMMUNICATION (SLO #1).
  • Analyze an audience using age, gender, cultural variation and other appropriate measures.
  • Design, deliver and differentiate a variety of speech types, including, at minimum, the speech to inform and one individual presentation within a group format (such as panel discussion, parliamentary procedure, or symposium, etc.).
  • Manage information while using a variety of formats and designs for facilitating group communication and delivering oral presentations.
  • Apply and evaluate appropriate verbal and nonverbal communication strategies for oral presentations.
  • Design presentational aids, audio and/or visual, appropriate to the audience, message and context.
  • Recognize and respond to techniques for managing communication apprehension.
  • APPLY EFFECTIVE LISTENING SKILLS TO COMPREHEND SPOKEN MESSAGES, ANALYZE INFORMATION CRITICALLY AND CONSIDER MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES (SLO #2).
  • Demonstrate critical listening skills.
  • Recognize and model constructive feedback.
  • COMPOSE IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #3).
  • Compose fully developed, structured and unified oral presentations, including formal written structure.
  • Locate, interpret and evaluate various research materials to accurately document sources (in oral and written form) according to a standard referencing style (such as MLA, APA, CBE, etc.).
  • Arrange and present views within a presentation with persuasive force.
  • ANALYZE AND FORMULATE CRITICAL THINKING WITHIN EVIDENCE AND REASONING OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #4).
  • Assess, evaluate, and apply a variety of rhetorical strategies that are effective and appropriate per the purpose, occasion and audience.
  • Arrange, paraphrase and effectively integrate evidence and/or supportive material into a presentation.
  • Apply critical thinking skills in decision making and problem-solving through systematic procedures or techniques for group discussion.
  • Evaluate communication effectiveness by considering group dynamics, group experience, roles, norms, leadership and other factors to recognize specific strategies for refining group discussion and oral presentations.
  • ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE'S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #5).
  • Recognize and apply ethical standards to the research, design and delivery of a message for an audience and occasion.
  • Recognize and integrate effective group leadership and conflict management skills.
  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF GROUP COMMUNICATION STUDIES (SLO #6).
  • Examine and apply theoretical frameworks within group communication.
  • Identify and differentiate different types of groups.
  • Analyze communication behaviors within group interactions.

COMM 341 Organizational Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D7
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to allow students to examine both theoretical and pragmatic essentials of effective organizational messages from preparation and presentation to efficacious observation and analysis. Students will explore the dynamics of organizational communications in basic communication skills, working relationships, leadership, diversity in the workplace, conflict negotiation teams and problem solving and/or decision making groups. The roles of internal and external messages on the communication process and organizational effectiveness will be examined and analyzed. Access to a computer with on-line capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES WITHIN THE DISCIPLINE OF ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION STUDIES (SLO #1).
  • Identify and analyze types of communication networks.
  • Apply and analyze organizational communication theory to a variety of organizational settings.
  • Identify and examine external influences on organizational culture in terms of ethical, behavioral, managerial, and technological approaches.
  • Compare and critique the various theoretical perspectives of leadership.
  • Examine the effects of globalization, cultural diversity, and outsourcing on organizations within current industries, based upon theoretical principles of communication.
  • ANALYZE AND FORMULATE CRITICAL THINKING WITHIN EVIDENCE AND REASONING OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #2).
  • Analyze issues and alternatives to implement conflict management strategies in a variety of organizational situations.
  • Recognize and employ team strategies for problem-solving and decision-making.
  • COMPOSE IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #3).
  • Design and compose an effective written message to report observations and analysis of communication strategies and components utilized within a working organization.
  • ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE'S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE, AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #4).
  • Describe and illustrate communication strategies within working relationships among diverse settings and people in contemporary organizations.
  • Identify types of power and analyze relationships between power, conflict and leadership.

COMM 361 The Communication Experience

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (COMM 325, 331, 361 combined: maximum transfer credit is one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts necessary for effective communication in a variety of settings with a variety of audiences. Special emphasis is placed on practical experiences within groups, facilitation of interpersonal relationships, and methods of conflict management. As part of this course, students are required to actively participate in groups and deliver oral presentations, both individually and in groups. Videotaping equipment may be used as an aid to the student’s self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EXPRESS AND CONVEY MESSAGES CLEARLY FOR EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE ORAL COMMUNICATION (SLO #1).
  • Apply and demonstrate verbal and nonverbal communication strategies for oral presentations within a variety of contexts and audiences.
  • Recognize and respond to techniques for managing communication apprehension.
  • EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED MESSAGES (SLO #2).
  • Design and deliver a variety of speech types while managing information and differentiating organizational patterns (speech designs).
  • Design presentational aids (audio and/or visual) that are appropriate to the audience, message and context.
  • Locate, interpret and evaluate various research materials to accurately document sources (in oral and written form) according to a standard referencing style (MLA, APA, CBE, etc.).
  • DEMONSTRATE EFFECTIVE LISTENING SKILLS TO COMPREHEND SPOKEN MESSAGES, ANALYZE INFORMATION CRITICALLY AND CONSIDER MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES (SLO #3).
  • Demonstrate critical listening skills and offer constructive feedback.
  • DEMONSTRATE ANALYTICAL AND CRITICAL THINKING WITHIN EVIDENCE AND REASONING OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #4).
  • Analyze conflict in communication and employ a variety of conflict management strategies.
  • Exhibit competence in the use of on-line data bases for research.
  • Incorporate effective communication strategies within small group situations.
  • DEMONSTRATE INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY AND INFLUENCE TO ETHICALLY, EFFECTIVELY AND APPROPRIATELY COMMUNICATE WITH DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #5).
  • Access the influence of culture on various aspects of communication.
  • Identify and integrate communication behaviors associated with satisfying interpersonal relationships.
  • Recognize and apply ethical standards to the research, design and delivery of a message for an audience and occasion.
  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF COMMUNICATION STUDIES (SLO #6).
  • Identify various fields of study within human communication.
  • Define the elements of intrapersonal communication and analyze the components of the perception process.
  • Differentiate the nature and function of small group communication from other communication contexts.

COMM 363 Introduction to Communication Theory

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area D7
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course will introduce the student to the symbolic process of human communication through the study of basic communication models, fundamental theory, and relevant research findings. Emphasis will be placed on achieving an understanding of the communication process, and the process through which researchers in the field add to their existing body of knowledge. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEFINE, IDENTIFY, EXPLAIN AND APPLY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ASSOCIATED WITH THE STUDY OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION (SLO #1).
  • Identify and describe major areas of study across the discipline of communication and the contributions of major scholars/researchers in terms of theoretical foundations to these areas.
  • Analyze human communication as a process according to theories which vary from one communication context to another.
  • Recognize the symbolic nature of communication and explain how form and function in symbols between a sender and receiver(s) impact the message content, context, and the channel through which the message is delivered.
  • EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #2).
  • Use clear and concise English in terms of spelling, grammar, paragraph structure, and continuity within essay writing.
  • Analyze competing points of views of subjects and determine the stances of the authors on the subjects as well to express individual stances logically and effectively on the subjects.

COMM 480 Honors Seminar: Political Campaign Communication

  • Same As:HONOR 340
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the Cosumnes River College Catalog.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4G
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

What do pundits, politicians and the public have in common? The ability to impact political campaign communication. This seminar-style course will introduce students to the effects of political campaign communication on public opinion and election results. Using timely data, students will evaluate news media, debate presidential debates, and analyze campaign messages using qualitative and quantitative
approaches. This course is intended for the honors student interested in learning about political communication, rhetorical criticism, and techniques for writing for academic audiences. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. This course
is the same as HONOR 340, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • EXPRESS IDEAS CLEARLY IN WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1, College Wide SLO – Area 1, and General Education SLO C5a – English Composition). This includes the ability to:
  • Express ideas clearly and completely in a variety of written formats.
  • Utilize correct and appropriate conventions of mechanics, usage, and style in written communication.
  • Comprehend main ideas and reasonably interpret written information.
  • Compose and apply properly documented sources of information.
  • UTILIZE MODES OF ANALYSIS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN A DISCIPLINE OF STUDY AS APPLIED TO SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND/OR PROBLEMS (SLO #2; College Wide SLO Area 3). This includes the ability to:
  • Contrast historical campaign communication with contemporary examples.
  • Distinguish between quantitative and qualitative theoretical approaches in research of political communication.
  • Analyze the critical process by differentiating between "maxims" that guide critical invention.
  • Compare and contrast different rhetorical approaches. Analyze contemporary pieces of rhetorical criticism and consider applications for current political messages.
  • Analyze reasoning processes to evaluate issues, value judgments or conclusions that determine the quality, validity, and/or reliability of information.
  • Construct an accurate and/or logical interpretation of reasoning while applying a framework of analytic concepts.
  • Explain the importance of the study of political campaign communication in the broader picture of society.
  • ACTIVELY ENGAGE IN INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY BEYOND THAT REQUIRED IN ORDER TO PASS A COURSE OF STUDY (SLO #3, College Wide SLO – Area 4). This includes the ability to:
  • Apply information and resources necessary to develop academically and personally.
  • Utilize skills from one’s “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc.
  • RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF DECISIONS AND ACTIONS (SLO #4, College Wide SLO – Area 5). This includes the ability to:
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in ethical reasoning necessary to exercise responsibility as an ethical individual, professional, local and global citizen.
  • ARTICULATE AN AWARENESS OF A VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES WITHIN A DISCIPLINE AND THE RELEVANCE OF THESE PERSPECTIVES TO ONE’S OWN LIFE (SLO #5, College Wide SLO – Area 2). This includes the ability to:
  • Collect and critically evaluate media messages. Focusing on news mediums (e.g. television, radio, newspapers, the Internet), assess the role of the media and its impact on campaign communication.
  • Contrast and assess the effectiveness of candidate messages. Construct rhetorical visions expressed in the campaign communication of presidential (and possibly other) candidates.
  • Debate the presidential debates. Analyze the presidential candidates' positions on political issues and performance effectiveness.
  • Assess voter reaction to the political debates and other forms of campaign communication. Select common themes communicated in focus groups research as a way to interpret public opinion.
  • Design and construct a critical paper evaluating some aspect of political campaign communication.
  • Consider the implications of writing for an academic audience.

COMM 482 Honors Seminar: Persuasion within Social Issues

  • Same As:HONOR 341
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300, ENGWR 480, or HONOR 375 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This seminar-style course will introduce students to the fundamental theories and techniques of persuasion as they occur in various communication contexts, including commercial, interpersonal, public and mass media. A series of writing assignments will focus on the skills of critical thinking, persuasion, and the sophistication of argumentative essay skills. Essays of advanced composition shall be evaluated for their quality in both critical thinking and composition. The writing assignments will apply theoretical models of critical thinking and communication studies to rhetoric, examining message production, analyzing messages, and exploring the fields of electronic and print media, advertising (product campaign), political campaign strategy, and ideological campaign techniques for mass communication. Students explore ethical considerations of persuasive communication, learn about types of reasoning, and identify fallacious arguments as they occur in persuasion. Students will focus on the design and organization of persuasive messages within a speech format for an individual or group presentations for a live audience. This course offers honors students the opportunity to study, critique, discuss and present advanced topics to focus on the impact of persuasive attempts within ethical, social and political issues. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and computer access is available on campus. Enrollment is limited to Honors Program students. Details about the Honors Program can be found in the front of the Catalog and on the CRC website. As COMM 315, Persuasion, has a similar basis as this Honors course, this course is not open to a student that has received credit for COMM 315, Persuasion. This course is the same as HONOR 341, and only one may be taken for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • COMPOSE IDEAS CLEARLY IN EFFECTIVE, APPROPRIATE AND WELL-ORGANIZED WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #1).
  • Use advanced lower-division composition techniques that address essay structure, continuity, emphasis and subtlety, elements of style, grammar as stylistic technique, audience, and persuasive essay writing.
  • Apply the advanced use of clarity (agent-action-goal) and coherence (concentration, focus, maintenance, clear orientation and subject control), concision and emphasis to develop writing skills appropriate for a sophisticated style of English.
  • Compose arguments cogently in a number of modes, including but not limited to making proposals, providing evaluation, and explanation of positions and the existence of causal and/or correlation relationships.
  • Design and organize persuasive messages within a speech format for an individual or group presentations for a live audience.
  • ANALYZE AND FORMULATE CRITICAL THINKING WITHIN THE EVIDENCE AND REASONING OF SPOKEN AND WRITTEN MESSAGES (SLO #2).
  • Identify, review, and utilize methods of persuasion for messages designed within a specific content issue or arena, such as a series of public service announcements for a social issue (such as anti-drug messages, or environmental green issues, or human civil rights, etc.), and/or political campaign or public office speeches, and other website or multimedia presentations.
  • Understand the nature of critical thinking and quality composition.
  • Apply the theoretical foundations for argument analysis, persuasion and essay construction of induction, deduction, analysis, synthesis, sound reasoning, and fallacy identification within the readings and writing of persuasive communication messages.
  • Analyze and respond to competing points of views to determine the stances of the authors on the subjects as well to express individual stances logically and effectively.
  • ASSESS INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY WITHIN ONE'S ABILITY TO INFLUENCE ETHICAL, EFFECTIVE AND APPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION AMONG DIVERSE SETTINGS AND PEOPLE (SLO #3).
  • Employ critical thinking and writing skills in reflection about multi-cultural diversity issues, ethics, and politics in terms of the effectiveness and appropriateness of persuasive communication.
  • DEFINE AND IDENTIFY VARIOUS THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES ACROSS THE DISCIPLINE OF COMMUNICATION STUDIES (SLO #4).
  • Analyze persuasive messages, including identifying and explaining the persuasive components or strategies used to effect change.
  • Identify persuasive strategies and their theoretical foundations as they exist in a variety of communication contexts (e.g., interpersonal compliance-gaining, commercial advertising, political rhetoric and campaigning, public speaking, mass media, etc.).
  • Differentiate between humanistic and social science approaches to persuasion.
  • Determine and evaluate criteria for the development of successful persuasive campaigns, focusing on a specific set of message designs in a specified content, such as a series of public service announcements in multimedia presentation, website information, published and/or transcribed speeches, and/or publication of printed materials.
  • Define and identify various theoretical perspectives across the discipline of Communication Studies within written and verbal messages prepared to present analysis of persuasive techniques and strategies to the other students participating in an Honors seminar-style format.

COMM 494 Topics in Communication

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to allow a student to focus on a set of contemporary communication concepts or theoretical frameworks in communication studies. Possible options for topics may include, but are not limited to: extemporaneous speaking, intercultural communication in the workplace or diverse settings, stages within interpersonal relationships, communication in the classroom, conflict, principles of visual communication, nonverbal communication, readers' theater, rhetorical criticism, parliamentary procedure and decision making techniques. Consult class schedule for specific topics offered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (SLO #1; College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and apply a study plan (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline of Communication Studies.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in communication studies to issues and/or educational activities pertaining to a specific topic (SLO #2; PSLO #4; and College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the study of a topic of contemporary communication studies to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Express ideas clearly in effective, appropriate and well-organized written messages (SLO #3; PSLO #3).
  • Construct short answer essays and/or written analysis that synthesize material from separate topic areas of the course.
  • Compose short answer essays and/or written reporting with correct grammar, sentence structure, and continuity.

COMM 495 Independent Studies in Communication

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).
  • Discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • Design an independent study (to be completed individually or by collaboration of a small group) to foster special knowledge, skills, and experience that are not available in any one regularly scheduled course.
  • Use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • SLO #2: Utilize modes of analysis and critical thinking to apply theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study to significant problems and/or educational activities (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 3).
  • Analyze and apply the knowledge, skills and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.
  • Explain the importance of the major discipline of study in the broader picture of society.
  • SLO #3: Communicate a complex understanding of content matter of the major discipline of study (College Wide Outcome – Area 3).
  • Demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • SLO #4: Identify personal goals and pursue these goals effectively (College Wide Outcome – Area 4).
  • Utilize skills from the “academic tool kit” including time management, study skills, etc., to accomplish the independent study within one semester term.

COMM 498 Work Experience in Communication and Media Studies

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position or job related to career goals.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment in their major field of study or advancement within their career. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. Appropriate level learning objectives are established by the student and the employer. During the semester, the student is required to participate in a weekly orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. Work Experience may be taken for a total of 16 units when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR IN A FIELD OF STUDY RELATED ONE’S CAREER.(SLO 1)
  • Understand the effects time, stress, and organizational management have on performance.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of consistently practicing ethics and confidentiality in a workplace.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of basic communication tools and their appropriate use.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of workplace etiquette.
  • DESCRIBE THE CAREER/LIFE PLANNING PROCESS AND RELATE ITS RELEVANCY TO ONE'S CAREER.(SLO 2)
  • Link personal goals to long term achievement.
  • Display an understanding of creating a professional first impression.
  • Understand how networking is a powerful job search tool.
  • Understand necessary elements of a résumé.
  • Understand the importance of interview preparation.
  • Identify how continual learning increases career success.
  • DEMONSTRATE APPLICATION OF INDUSTRY KNOWLEDGE AND THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AS WRITTEN IN LEARNING OBJECTIVES IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE EMPLOYER WORK SITE SUPERVISOR.(SLO 3)