Biology

Associate Degrees for Transfer

A.S.-T. in Biology

The Associate in Science in Biology for Transfer Degree is designed to prepare students for a seamless transfer into the CSU system to complete a baccalaureate degree in Biology or a similar major. Students with this degree will receive priority admission with junior status to the California State University system. The Associate in Science in Nutrition and Dietetics for Transfer is comprised of lower division coursework typically required by CSU institutions. Students must complete the following Associate Degree for Transfer requirements (Pursuant to SB1440, §66746):

  • Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for transfer to the California State University.
  • The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) pattern.
  • A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college district.
  • Obtainment of a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
  • A grade of “C” or better in all courses required for the major or area of emphasis.

Completion of the AS-T degree may not prepare students to transfer to University of California biology programs that may have different requirements. If a student intends to transfer to University of California, additional courses in chemistry, physics, and math may be required.

Note to Transfer Students:
The Associate Degree for Transfer program is designed for students who plan to transfer to a campus of the California State University (CSU). Other than the required core, the courses you choose to complete this degree will depend to some extent on the selected CSU for transfer. In addition, some IGETC requirements can also be completed using courses required for this associate degree for transfer major (known as “double-counting”). Meeting with a counselor to determine the most appropriate course choices will facilitate efficient completion of a student’s transfer requirements. For students wishing to transfer to other universities (UC System, private, or out-of-state), the Associate Degree for Transfer may not provide adequate preparation for upper-division transfer admissions, because many universities require more lower division courses than those in this degree. Even the CSU's that accept this transfer degree may likely require additional lower division courses to achieve the Bachelor degree. It is critical that students meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for the major, as programs vary widely in terms of the required preparation.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2019

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology 5
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany 5
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology 5
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I 5
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II 5
MATH 350 Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I (3) 3 - 5
   or MATH 400 Calculus I (5)
PHYS 350 General Physics 4
PHYS 360 General Physics 4
Total Units: 36 - 38

The Associate in Science in Biology for Transfer (AS-T) degree may be obtained by completion of 60 transferable, semester units with a minimum 2.0 GPA, including (a) the major or area of emphasis described in the Required Program, and (b) the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (IGETC for STEM).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. This includes the ability to… Elucidate the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge. Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established “authorities” is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data. Design a scientific inquiry, including use of proper controls and analyses Demonstrate critical thinking skills by the analysis of data sets, recognition of the implications of perturbations to biological systems, and synthesis of information to draw conclusions.
  • EXPRESS ONE'S SELF CLEARLY WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT BIOLOGY, DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC BIOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING OF MAJOR BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. This includes the ability to produce: Laboratory reports which address background information, procedures, results, and analysis of data developed during a laboratory exercise or inquiry project. Essays explaining biological processes in clear and concise terms. Reports and term papers which clearly explain biological processes and elucidate current theories explaining biological phenomena.
  • DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE, AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. This includes the ability to: Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the major content areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Analyze the logic of a multiple-choice question about biology and select the correct response from among related items. Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer. Utilize test-taking skills such as critical analysis of information, test-time management and focused writing. Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.
  • CHOOSE AND UTILIZE APPROPRIATE LABORATORY TECHNIQUES PROFICIENTLY. Biology majors' lab techniques include: Measurement (use of metric measures) Microscopy Pipetting Gel electrophoresis Dissection Basic biochemical techniques such as pH testing, Biuret test, Benedict’s test, etc. Ability to design a laboratory experiment, including the use of adequate controls and choice of analyses used to examine data, etc. Additional laboratory techniques relevant to biology majors can be found in the SLOs for the chemistry and physics courses required for this major.
  • EVALUATE BIOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS, AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY, AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. This includes the ability to: Choose what data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis. Collect data and keep organized records. Conduct basic graphical and statistical analysis of data. Reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on biological data. Relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how biological information is relevant to personal and community issues. Recognize the ethical implications of biological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely.
  • EMPLOY INFORMATION-GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE BIOLOGICAL IDEAS. This includes the ability to… Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found. Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.

Career Information

Research, Teaching, or Industrial Laboratory Careers in Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Genetics, Wildlife Biology, Marine Biology, Pharmacy, Nutrition, Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary, Optometry, etc. Some career options require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required for some career options or to fully prepare students for transfer to a university program.

Associate Degrees

A.S. in Biology: Biological Sciences, Biology Concentration Option

CRC's Biology program offers courses which satisfy general education requirements in Life Sciences, are prerequisites for a degree in Veterinary Technology, Medical Assisting, Health Information Technology, and Environmental Technology, and prepare students for transfer opportunities to four-year programs in biological sciences, nursing, physical therapy, and programs leading to careers in teaching, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, etc.

Highlights of the program include:

  • Extensive laboratory experience
  • Day and evening sections of pre-nursing classes
  • Field Trips
  • A friendly faculty who have studied biology in South America, the Galapagos Islands, Africa and North America
  • A Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program
  • Field Studies Classes

Field Studies Classes at Cosumnes River College:
Nature is often the best classroom! Come learn outside in Cosumnes River College's field study courses. These classes consist of short classroom sessions followed by extended trips to some of the most unique and beautiful environments in California, including Big Sur, Monterey Bay, Mt. Lassen, Point Reyes, Yosemite, and more! These short term classes are offered by several departments, including Biology, Geography, Geology, Photography, and Physical Education. For more information about specific classes, consult the class schedule or visit the Los Rios Field Study Consortium website at: www.losrios.edu/fieldstudy

Note to Transfer Students:
If you are interested in transferring to a four-year college or university to pursue a bachelor’s degree in this major, it is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for your major. Schools vary widely in terms of the required preparation. The courses that CRC requires for an Associate’s degree in this major may be different from the requirements needed for the Bachelor’s degree. Students planning to continue for a four-year degree should consult the lower division requirements of the transfer program of the university to which they plan to attend.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2019

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology 5
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany 5
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology 5
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I 5
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II 5
[ MATH 350 Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I (3) 6 - 10
and MATH 351 ] Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences II (3)
or [ MATH 400 Calculus I (5)
and MATH 401 ] Calculus II (5)
[[ PHYS 350 General Physics (4) 8 - 121
and PHYS 360 ] General Physics (4)
or [ PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics (5)
and PHYS 380 ]] Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics (5)
or [[ PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids (4)
and PHYS 421 ] Electricity and Magnetism (4)
and PHYS 431 ] Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics (4)
Total Units: 39 - 47

1It is important to check with a counselor as transfer schools vary widely in terms of the required courses.

The Biology: Biological Sciences, Biology Concentration Option Associate in Science (A.S.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See CRC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. This includes the ability to: *Elucidate the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge. *Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established “authorities” is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data. *Design a scientific inquiry, including use of proper controls and analyses. *Demonstrate critical thinking skills by the analysis of data sets, recognition of the implications of perturbations to biological systems, and synthesis of information to draw conclusions. (SLO 1)
  • EXPRESS ONE'S SELF CLEARLY WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT BIOLOGY, DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC BIOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING OF MAJOR BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. This includes the ability to produce: *Laboratory reports which address background information, procedures, results, and analysis of data developed during a laboratory exercise or inquiry project. *Essays explaining biological processes in clear and concise terms. *Reports and term papers which clearly explain biological processes and elucidate current theories explaining biological phenomena. (SLO 2)
  • DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE, AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. This includes the ability to: *Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the major content areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. *Analyze the logic of a multiple-choice question about biology and select the correct response from among related items. *Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer. *Utilize test-taking skills such as critical analysis of information, test-time management and focused writing. *Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. (SLO 3)
  • CHOOSE AND UTILIZE APPROPRIATE LABORATORY TECHNIQUES PROFICIENTLY. Biology majors' lab techniques include: *Measurement (use of metric measures) *Microscopy *Pipetting *Gel electrophoresis *Dissection *Basic biochemical techniques such as pH testing, Biuret test, Benedict’s test, etc. *Ability to design a laboratory experiment, including the use of adequate controls and choice of analyses used to examine data, etc. Additional laboratory techniques relevant to biology majors can be found in the SLOs for the chemistry and physics courses required for this major. (SLO 4)
  • EVALUATE BIOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS, AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY, AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. This includes the ability to: *Choose what data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis. *Collect data and keep organized records. *Conduct basic graphical and statistical analysis of data. *Reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on biological data. *Relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how biological information is relevant to personal and community issues. *Recognize the ethical implications of biological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely. (SLO 5)
  • EMPLOY INFORMATION-GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE BIOLOGICAL IDEAS. This includes the ability to: *Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found. *Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found. (SLO 6)

Career Information

Research, Teaching, or Industrial Laboratory Careers in Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Genetics, Wildlife Biology, Marine Biology, Pharmacy, Nutrition, etc.

Some career options require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required for some career options or to fully prepare students for transfer to a university program.


A.S. in Biology: Pre-Nursing Option

CRC's Biology, Pre-nursing option offers courses which satisfy general education requirements in Life Sciences, are prerequisites for a degree in Veterinary Technology, Medical Assisting, Health Information Technology, and Nursing, and prepare students for transfer opportunities to four-year programs in nursing, physical therapy, and programs leading to careers in allied health fields.

Highlights of the program include:

  • Extensive laboratory experience
  • Day and evening sections of pre-nursing classes
  • A friendly faculty who have studied biology in South America, the Galapagos Islands, Africa and North America
  • A Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program

Note: This degree is designed for students intending to transfer to a nursing program at a 4-year college or university. It does not prepare the student for immediate employment as a nurse. Students earning a nursing degree will need to complete several lower division nursing classes after transferring.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2019

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 440 General Microbiology 41
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology 5
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology 5
[ CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry (5) 5 - 10
and CHEM 306 ] Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry (5)
or CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (5)
NUTRI 300 Nutrition 3
FCS 324 Human Development: A Life Span 3
PSYC 300 General Principles (3) 3
   or PSYC 320 Social Psychology (3)
Total Units: 28 - 33

1Note: This degree is designed for students intending to transfer to a nursing program at a 4-year college or university. It does not prepare the student for immediate employment as a nurse. Students earning a nursing degree will need to complete several lower division nursing classes after transferring.

The Biology: Pre-Nursing Option Associate in Science (A.S.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See CRC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the processes of science, the scientific method, and the relationship between scientific research and established knowledge. This includes the ability to… Elucidate the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge. Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established “authorities” is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data. Design a scientific inquiry, including use of proper controls and analyses Demonstrate critical thinking skills by the analysis of data sets, recognition of the implications of perturbations to biological systems, and synthesis of information to draw conclusions. </ul>
  • Express themselves clearly when writing or speaking about biology, demonstrating knowledge of basic biological terminology and understanding of major biological concepts. This includes the ability to produce: Laboratory reports which address background information, procedures, results, and analysis of data developed during a laboratory exercise or inquiry project Essays explaining biological processes in clear and concise terms Reports and term papers which clearly explain biological processes and elucidate current theories explaining biological phenomena
  • Demonstrate both content knowledge and test taking skills when completing essay, objective, and multiple choice exams. This includes the ability to: Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the major content areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution. Analyze the logic of a multiple-choice question about biology and select the correct response from among related items. Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer Utilize test-taking skills such as critical analysis of information, test-time management and focused writing Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.
  • Use appropriate laboratory techniques proficiently. Pre-nursing majors lab techniques include: Measurement (use of metric measures) Microscopy (including histology) Identification of unknown microorganisms Staining of bacteria Use of equipment used to gather physiological data on humans Additional laboratory techniques relevant to pre-nursing majors can be found in the SLOs for the chemistry courses required for this career option.
  • Evaluate biological data, draw reasonable conclusions, recognize the ethical implications of these conclusions, and apply these conclusions to personal, community, and scientific problems. This includes the ability to: Choose what data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis Collect data and keep organized records Conduct basic graphical and statistical analysis of data Reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on biological data Relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how biological information is relevant to personal and community issues Recognize the ethical implications of biological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely
  • Employ information-gathering tools investigate biological ideas. This includes the ability to… Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found. Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.

Career Information

Nursing, Physician's Assistant, Physical Therapy, etc. Some career options require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required for some career options or to fully prepare students for transfer to a university program.


A.S. in Biology: A.S. Degree

What do antibiotic resistance, hemophilia, DNA fingerprinting, sequoias, cuttlefish, intertidal zones, and global climate change have in common? These are a few examples of the diverse topics that are explored in biology, which is the scientific study of living organisms including their structure, function, evolution, and interactions with other organisms and with the environment.

Highlights of the program include:

  • Extensive hands-on learning approach in laboratory courses that provide students with opportunities to use modern equipment and techniques.
  • Small class sizes taught by enthusiastic biology professors who set high standards but who demonstrate how to achieve those standards.
  • A high level of satisfaction with the education received at CRC is reported by students who transfer to 4-year universities.
  • A Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program to help students develop academic and leadership skills.

Note to Transfer Students:
This degree is intended to prepare students for transfer to a University of California campus or other four-year institutions. It is critical that you meet with a counselor from your desired transfer institution to select and plan the courses for your major. Some UC programs may require calculus-based (not trigonometry based) physics with lab before graduation. Additionally, some UC programs may require statistics prior to graduation.

Colleges and universities vary widely in their requirements for degrees. The courses that CRC requires for an Associate’s degree may be different from the requirements for a Bachelor’s degree. Therefore, you are strongly encouraged to meet with both a CRC counselor and a counselor from your desired transfer institution in order to understand the lower division requirements for the program at the college or university you plan to attend.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2019

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology 5
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany 5
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology 5
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I 5
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II 5
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I 5
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II 5
[[ MATH 350 Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I (3) 6 - 10
and MATH 351 ] Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences II (3)
or [ MATH 355 Calculus for Biology and Medicine I (4)
and MATH 356 ]] Calculus for Biology and Medicine II (4)
or [ MATH 400 Calculus I (5)
and MATH 401 ] Calculus II (5)
Total Units: 41 - 45

The Biology: A.S. Degree Associate in Science (A.S.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See CRC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. (PSLO 1)
  • Elucidate the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge.
  • Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established “authorities” is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data.
  • Design a scientific inquiry, including use of proper controls and analyses.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills by the analysis of data sets, recognition of the implications of perturbations to biological systems, and synthesis of information to draw conclusions.
  • EXPRESS ONE'S SELF CLEARLY WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT BIOLOGY, DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC BIOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING OF MAJOR BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. (PSLO 2)
  • Produce laboratory reports which address background information, procedures, results, and analysis of data developed during a laboratory exercise or inquiry project.
  • Produce essays explaining biological processes in clear and concise terms.
  • Produce reports and term papers which clearly explain biological processes and elucidate current theories explaining biological phenomena.
  • DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE, AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. (PSLO 3)
  • Demonstrate problem-solving abilities in the major content areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.
  • Analyze the logic of a multiple-choice question about biology and select the correct response from among related items.
  • Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer.
  • Utilize test-taking skills such as critical analysis of information, test-time management and focused writing.
  • Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of biology including cell biology, anatomy, physiology, genetics, ecology, and evolution.
  • CHOOSE AND UTILIZE APPROPRIATE LABORATORY TECHNIQUES PROFICIENTLY. (PSLO 4)
  • Demonstrate proficient use of measurement (use of metric measures).
  • Demonstrate proficient use of microscopy.
  • Demonstrate proficient use of pipetting.
  • Demonstrate proficient use of gel electrophoresis.
  • Demonstrate proficient use of dissection.
  • Demonstrate proficient use of basic biochemical techniques such as pH testing, Biuret test, Benedict’s test, etc.
  • Demonstrate the ability to design a laboratory experiment, including the use of adequate controls and choice of analyses used to examine data, etc.
  • EVALUATE BIOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS, AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY, AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. (PSLO 5)
  • Choose what data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis.
  • Collect data and keep organized records.
  • Conduct basic graphical and statistical analysis of data.
  • Reach and clearly express logical conclusions based on biological data.
  • Relate, in presentations and/or in written reports, how biological information is relevant to personal and community issues.
  • Recognize the ethical implications of biological research and the responsibility to use knowledge wisely.
  • EMPLOY INFORMATION-GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE BIOLOGICAL IDEAS. (PSLO 6)
  • Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.
  • Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.

Career Information

Research, Teaching, or Industrial Laboratory Careers in Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Genetics, Wildlife Biology, Marine Biology, Pharmacy, Nutrition, Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary, Optometry, etc. These career options require more than two years of college study. Classes beyond the associate degree may be required for career options or to fully prepare students for transfer to a university program.


A.S. in General Science

Areas of Study include:

  • Physical Anthropology
  • Astronomy
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Engineering
  • Physical Geography
  • Geology
  • Physics

Eighteen (18) units of transfer level course work in science is required. Two laboratory courses must be included: one in the physical sciences and one in the biological sciences. Courses may be selected from astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physical geography, physical anthropology, and physics. The student, in consultation with a counselor, should choose science courses to meet his or her program, transfer, or general education requirements.

Students interested in transferring to a four-year university with a science major are encouraged to complete a science AS or AS-T degree such as Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology, or Physics. This General Science degree may not include the majors-level transfer courses needed for many science majors. Students are strongly recommended to see a counselor for guidance.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2019

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
A minimum of 4 units from the following: 4
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology (3)
and ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology (4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology (4)
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory (1)
and ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (5)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (1)
and CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry (3)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II (5)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory (1)
and GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory (1)
and GEOL 300 Physical Geology (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory (1)
and GEOL 305 Earth Science (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory (1)
and GEOL 310 Historical Geology (3)
ENGR 304 How Things Work (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics (4)
A minimum of 11 units from the following: 111
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology (3)
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1)
ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy (3)
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory (1)
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology (3)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology (4)
BIOL 342 The New Plagues: New and Ancient Infectious Diseases Threatening World Health (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology (3)
BIOL 352 Conservation Biology (3)
BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study (0.5 - 4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology (4)
BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (5)
CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry (3)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (1)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II (5)
ENGR 304 How Things Work (3)
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems (3)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory (1)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change (3)
GEOG 306 Weather and Climate (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory (1)
GEOL 305 Earth Science (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory (1)
GEOL 310 Historical Geology (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory (1)
GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography (3)
GEOL 390 Field Studies in Geology (1 - 4)
PHYS 310 Conceptual Physics (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics (4)
Total Units: 18

1Courses used in A or B above will not count towards C, except units exceeding the 4 or 3 unit minimum in A and B. For example, a student completing the 5 unit CHEM 309 under B could apply 2 of those units towards C. A total of 18 science units is required.

The General Science Associate in Science (A.S.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See CRC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • explain the core perspectives of the scientific method and apply it to at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 1)
  • solve introductory problems of a conceptual and/or numerical nature of at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 2)
  • accurately apply the basic vocabulary and concepts of at least one scientific discipline verbally and in writing. (SLO 3)
  • recognize the use and misuse of scientific concepts in society including politics and the media. (SLO 4)

Biology, A.S. Degree

Program Map Here

Biology, A.S.-T Degree

Program Map Here

Biology, A.S.-T Degree, IGETC

Program Map Here

Biology, Concentration, A.S. Degree

Program Map Here

Biology, Pre-Nursing, A.S. Degree

Program Map Here