Anthropology

Associate Degrees for Transfer

A.A.-T. in Anthropology

The Associate in Arts in Anthropology for Transfer Degree (AA-T) is designed to meet common lower-division requirements for a major in Anthropology at California State University (CSU) campuses by completion of 60 transferable semester units with a minimum 2.0 GPA, to include either the California State University General Education Breadth pattern or the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum; students must earn a grade of C or better in all the courses for the major as described in the Required Program.

Anthropology is the study of humans. Anthropologists study our species throughout time; focusing on our diverse modern culture and cultural adaptations, our biological classification as a species and our inclusion in the Order Primates, and our species' past developments, including our first steps to our first civilizations. The goal of Anthropology is to study the similarities and differences in biological and cultural adaptations and features across the globe throughout our human history.

Anthropology is a holistic discipline, which means that anthropologists study all aspects of humans and our behavior. The field of Anthropology has been broken up into four main sub-fields: Cultural Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology and Linguistics. Cultural Anthropology is concerned with the study of human culture and its variations across time and space. Biological Anthropologists aim to study our species from a biological perspective- examining our DNA, relationship to our closest animal relatives, the primates and the fossil evidence of our earliest human ancestors. Archaeology is the study of our past, focused specifically on reconstructing past behavior by looking at objects used by past people. Linguistic Anthropologists study human language and communication.

This degree offers courses that satisfy lower division General Education requirements in both the physical and social sciences, providing students with a solid foundation in anthropology as well as the standard prerequisites for upper division coursework leading to the baccalaureate degree. Students planning to transfer to a four-year school with a major in Anthropology should consult the lower division requirements at the university they plan to attend.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2019

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
Core:
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology 3
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory 1
ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology (3) 3
   or ANTH 313 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: Medical Focus (3)
ANTH 323 Introduction to Archaeology 3
STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4) 3 - 4
   or PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (3)
Anthropology Electives:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ANTH 303 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology (3)
ANTH 316 Global Forces in Culture Change (3)
ANTH 324 World Prehistory (3)
ANTH 331 The Anthropology of Religion (3)
ANTH 332 Native Peoples of California (3)
ANTH 334 Native Peoples of North America (3)
ANTH 341 Introduction to Linguistics (3)
ANTH 374 Birth to Death: The Anthropology of Primate Culture and Behavior (3)
ANTH 336 Anthropology of Sex, Sexuality and Gender (3)
Science Electives:
[[[ GEOL 300 Physical Geology (3) 3 - 4
and GEOL 301 ] Physical Geology Laboratory (1)
or [ GEOL 305 Earth Science (3)
and GEOL 306 ]] Earth Science Laboratory (1)
or GEOG 335 ] Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications (3)
or PSYC 335 Research Methods in Psychology (3)
Total Units: 19 - 21

The Associate in Arts in Anthropology for Transfer (AA-T) degree may be obtained by completion of 60 transferable, semester units with a minimum 2.0 GPA, including (a) the major or area of emphasis described in the Required Program, and (b) either the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University General Education-Breadth Requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. (PSLO 1)
  • Recognize the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge.
  • Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established "authorities" is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data.
  • Design a scientific inquiry.
  • CLEARLY EXPRESS SELF WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT ANTHROPOLOGY DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC ANTHROPOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING MAJOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. (PSLO 2)
  • Produce laboratory exercises or field projects which address background information, procedures, results and analysis of data developed during the event of activity.
  • Write essays explaining anthropological processes in clear and concise terms
  • DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. (PSLO 3)
  • Demonstrate problem solving abilities in major content areas of Anthropology including evolution, genetics, culture, archaeology and human evolution.
  • Analyze the logic of multiple choice questions and choose the correct response from among related items.
  • Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer.
  • Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of anthropology including evolution, culture, genetics, archaeology and human evolution.
  • UTILIZE APPROPRIATE FIELDWORK TECHNIQUES FOR ANTHROPOLOGY. (PSLO 4)
  • Conduct participation observation studies.
  • Take appropriate field notes while conducting participant observation studies.
  • Gather data in an appropriate, non-judgmental manner.
  • Perform skeletal measurements.
  • Identify major bones and features of both human and non-human primates.
  • Design an anthropological experiment.
  • Use diagrams, sketches and maps appropriately in field write-ups.
  • EVALUATE ANTHROPOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. (PSLO 5)
  • Choose appropriate data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis.
  • Collect data and keep organized records.
  • Use basic graphical and statistical analysis of data.
  • Reach and express logical conclusions drawn on anthropological data.
  • Present data in the form of posters, presentations, and/or written reports how anthropological information is relevant to personal and community issues.
  • Recognize the ethical implications of research on human subjects.
  • EMPLOY INFORMATION GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE ANTHROPOLOGICAL IDEAS. (PSLO 6)
  • Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.
  • Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found

Career Information

Anthropologists with baccalaureate or graduate degrees work as archaeological technicians or project directors for private, state or federal organizations, museum management, forensic specialists in police departments and crime labs, primatology and zoo curation, teaching, consultant or analyst for private, government or educational institutions, non-profit organizations, information technologies, tourism, public health services, and social work.

NOTE TO TRANSFER STUDENTS:
The Associate Degree for Transfer program is designed for students who plan to transfer to a campus of the California State University (CSU). Other than the required core, the courses you choose to complete this degree will depend to some extent on the selected CSU for transfer. In addition, some CSU-GE Breadth or IGETC requirements can also be completed using courses required for this associate degree for transfer major (known as “double-counting”). Meeting with a counselor to determine the most appropriate course choices will facilitate efficient completion of your transfer requirements. For students wishing to transfer to other universities (UC System, private, or out-of-state), the Associate Degree for Transfer may not provide adequate preparation for upper-division transfer admissions, because many universities require more lower division courses than those in this degree. Even the CSU's that accept this transfer degree may likely require more lower division courses to achieve the Bachelor degree. It is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for the major, as programs vary widely in terms of the required preparation.

Associate Degrees

A.S. in Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humans. Anthropologists study our species throughout time; focusing on our diverse modern culture and cultural adaptations, our biological classification as a species and our inclusion in the Order Primates, and our species past developments, including our first steps to our first civilizations. The goal of Anthropology is to study the similarities and differences in biological and cultural adaptations and features across the globe throughout our human history.

Anthropology is a holistic discipline, which means that anthropologists study all aspects of humans and our behavior. The field of Anthropology has been broken up into four main sub-fields: Cultural Anthropology, Physical Anthropology, Archaeology and Linguistics. Cultural Anthropology is concerned with the study of human culture and its variations across time and space. Physical Anthropologists aim to study our species from a biological perspective- examining our DNA, relationship to our closest animal relatives, the primates and the fossil evidence of our earliest human ancestors. Archaeology is the study of our past, focused specifically on reconstructing past behavior by looking at objects used by past people. Linguistic Anthropologists study human language and communication.

The CRC Anthropology program offers courses that satisfy lower division General Education requirements in both the physical and social sciences. In addition, the program offers an Associate Degree in Anthropology that provides students with a solid foundation in anthropology as well as the standard prerequisites for upper division coursework leading to the baccalaureate degree. Students planning to transfer to a four-year school with a major in Anthropology should consult the lower division requirements at the university they plan to attend.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2019

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
Fall, Spring or Summer Term:
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology 3
Fall, Spring or Summer Term:
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory 1
Fall, Spring or Summer Term:
ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology (3) 3
   or ANTH 313 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: Medical Focus (3)
Spring Semester:
ANTH 323 Introduction to Archaeology 3
Check with department for schedule:
PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (3) 3 - 4
   or STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4)
Check with department for schedule:
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
ANTH 303 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology (3)
ANTH 316 Global Forces in Culture Change (3)
ANTH 324 World Prehistory (3)
ANTH 331 The Anthropology of Religion (3)
ANTH 332 Native Peoples of California (3)
ANTH 334 Native Peoples of North America (3)
ANTH 341 Introduction to Linguistics (3)
ANTH 374 Birth to Death: The Anthropology of Primate Culture and Behavior (3)
ANTH 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology (1 - 3)
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
Any other Anthropology course listed above
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology (3)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society (3)
COMM 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes (3)
GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies (3)
GEOG 335 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications (3)
MUFHL 330 World Music (3)
NUTRI 310 Cultural Foods of the World (3)
PHIL 352 Introduction to World Religions (3)
PSYC 368 Cross Cultural Psychology (3)
SOC 321 Race, Ethnicity and Inequality in the United States (3)
Total Units: 22 - 23

The Anthropology Associate in Science (A.S.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See CRC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. (PSLO 1)
  • Recognize the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge.
  • Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established "authorities" is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data.
  • Design a scientific inquiry.
  • CLEARLY EXPRESS SELF WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT ANTHROPOLOGY DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC ANTHROPOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING MAJOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. (PSLO 2)
  • Produce laboratory exercises or field projects which address background information, procedures, results and analysis of data developed during the event of activity.
  • Write essays explaining anthropological processes in clear and concise terms.
  • DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. (PSLO 3)
  • Demonstrate problem solving abilities in major content areas of Anthropology including evolution, genetics, culture, archaeology and human evolution.
  • Analyze the logic of multiple choice questions and choose the correct response from among related items.
  • Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer.
  • Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of anthropology including evolution, culture, genetics, archaeology and human evolution.
  • UTILIZE APPROPRIATE FIELDWORK TECHNIQUES FOR ANTHROPOLOGY. (PSLO 4)
  • Conduct participation observation studies.
  • Take appropriate field notes while conducting participant observation studies.
  • Gather data in an appropriate, non-judgmental manner.
  • Perform skeletal measurements.
  • Identify major bones and features of both human and non-human primates.
  • Design an anthropological experiment.
  • Use diagrams, sketches and maps appropriately in field write-ups.
  • EVALUATE ANTHROPOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. (PSLO 5)
  • Choose appropriate data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis.
  • Collect data and keep organized records.
  • Use basic graphical and statistical analysis of data.
  • Reach and express logical conclusions drawn on anthropological data.
  • Present data in the form of posters, presentations, and/or written reports how anthropological information is relevant to personal and community issues.
  • Recognize the ethical implications of research on human subjects.
  • EMPLOY INFORMATION GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE ANTHROPOLOGICAL IDEAS. (PSLO 6)
  • Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.
  • Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.
  • STUDENTS WILL EMBRACE CULTURAL DIVERSITY. (PSLO 7)
  • Apply the concept of cultural relativism to real world situations.
  • Develop the perspective of "global citizen" to encourage respect for the world's people and environment.
  • Recognize factors of human biological and cultural variation.
  • Celebrate the varied trajectory of our species from prehistory and into the future.

Career Information

Anthropologists with baccalaureate or graduate degrees work as archaeological technicians or project directors for private, state or federal organizations, museum management, forensic specialists in police departments and crime labs, primatology and zoo curation, teaching, consultant or analyst for private, government or educational institutions, non-profit organizations, information technologies, tourism, public health services, and social work.


A.S. in General Science

Areas of Study include:

  • Physical Anthropology
  • Astronomy
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Engineering
  • Physical Geography
  • Geology
  • Physics

Eighteen (18) units of transfer level course work in science is required. Two laboratory courses must be included: one in the physical sciences and one in the biological sciences. Courses may be selected from astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physical geography, physical anthropology, and physics. The student, in consultation with a counselor, should choose science courses to meet his or her program, transfer, or general education requirements.

Students interested in transferring to a four-year university with a science major are encouraged to complete a science AS or AS-T degree such as Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology, or Physics. This General Science degree may not include the majors-level transfer courses needed for many science majors. Students are strongly recommended to see a counselor for guidance.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2019

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
A. Life Science with Lab:
A minimum of 4 units from the following: 4
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology (3)
and ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology (4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology (4)
B. Physical Science with Lab:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory (1)
and ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (5)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (1)
and CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry (3)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II (5)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory (1)
and GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory (1)
and GEOL 300 Physical Geology (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory (1)
and GEOL 305 Earth Science (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory (1)
and GEOL 310 Historical Geology (3)
ENGR 304 How Things Work (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics (4)
C. Additional Science Courses:
A minimum of 11 units from the following: 111
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology (3)
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1)
ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy (3)
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory (1)
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology (3)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology (4)
BIOL 342 The New Plagues: New and Ancient Infectious Diseases Threatening World Health (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology (3)
BIOL 352 Conservation Biology (3)
BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study (0.5 - 4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology (4)
BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry (5)
CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry (3)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (1)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II (5)
ENGR 304 How Things Work (3)
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems (3)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory (1)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change (3)
GEOG 306 Weather and Climate (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory (1)
GEOL 305 Earth Science (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory (1)
GEOL 310 Historical Geology (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory (1)
GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography (3)
GEOL 390 Field Studies in Geology (1 - 4)
PHYS 310 Conceptual Physics (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics (4)
Total Units: 18

1Courses used in A or B above will not count towards C, except units exceeding the 4 or 3 unit minimum in A and B. For example, a student completing the 5 unit CHEM 309 under B could apply 2 of those units towards C. A total of 18 science units is required.

The General Science Associate in Science (A.S.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See CRC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • explain the core perspectives of the scientific method and apply it to at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 1)
  • solve introductory problems of a conceptual and/or numerical nature of at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 2)
  • accurately apply the basic vocabulary and concepts of at least one scientific discipline verbally and in writing. (SLO 3)
  • recognize the use and misuse of scientific concepts in society including politics and the media. (SLO 4)