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Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

PHIL 300 Introduction to Philosophy

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID PHIL 100

In this course, students will apply the critical thinking techniques of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis to areas of philosophical inquiry including meta-philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of religion, history of philosophy, and existentialism. Students will practice distinguishing fact from opinion, employing inductive and deductive reasoning, identifying logical errors and fallacies, and developing oral and written arguments to support their own philosophical perspectives or challenge the perspectives of others. The quality and quantity of the course's required writing will reflect the standards of a second semester composition course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: identify important questions and conceptions within a range of traditional subfields of Philosophy (Epistemology, Metaphysics, Logic, Ethics, and Aesthetics), distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported, construct well supported interpretations of diverse viewpoints and reason well about written and oral discourse.

PHIL 304 Introduction to Asian Philosophy

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course provides an introduction to the philosophical traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism focusing on metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

Identify important questions and conceptions within a range of traditional subfields of Philosophy (Epistemology, Metaphysics, Logic, Ethics, and Aesthetics) as they are addressed within a range of classical Asian philosophical traditions (Hindu, Confucian, Taoist, Buddhist), distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported, construct well supported interpretations of diverse viewpoints and reason well about written and oral discourse (SLO1, PSLO1).

PHIL 310 Introduction to Ethics

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID PHIL 120

The application of theories developed by traditional and contemporary moral philosophy to the ethical problems, dilemmas, and issues of today.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: identify important questions and conceptions within Ethics, distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported, construct well supported interpretations of diverse viewpoints and reason well about written and oral discourse.

PHIL 320 Logic and Critical Reasoning

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

An introduction to basic principles and frameworks of logic and critical thinking appropriately used in argument analysis: deduction, induction, fallacy recognition. Emphasis on developing analytical skills and applying principles of good reasoning to the arguments encountered in life. Argument topics from academic fields and textbooks, the electronic and print media, advertisements, politics and ethics may be considered. The quality and quantity of the course's required writing will reflect the standards of a second semester composition course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

identify important questions and conceptions, distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported; construct well supported interpretations of diverse viewpoints; and reason well about written and oral discourse (SLO1, PSLO2).

PHIL 325 Symbolic Logic

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course introduces sentential and predicate logic by introducing logical symbolism, truth tables, methods of formal analysis and methods of formal proof including natural deduction. It is recommended for students in the sciences, computer programming, mathematics, linguistics, law, and philosophy.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

distinguish an argument from a description, explanation, or report.

PHIL 330 History of Classical Philosophy

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course is a survey of the origin and development of Western Philosophy from the period of the ancient Greeks and Romans, and continuing through the Middle Ages. This course is especially recommended for all philosophy, history and humanities majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: identify important questions and conceptions within the history of classical (or ancient) philosophy, distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported, construct well supported interpretations of diverse viewpoints and reason well about written and oral discourse.

PHIL 331 History of Modern Philosophy

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course is a survey of the development of Western Philosophy from the period of the Renaissance through the period of modern Europe and America. This course is especially recommended for all Philosophy, History and Humanities majors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

develop critical thinking, writing and reading skills.

PHIL 338 Contemporary Philosophy

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

A comprehensive study of the basic ideas of pragmatists, twentieth century metaphysicians, philosophy of language, and existentialists. Special attention will be given to relevance of their ideas to modern life

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: identify important questions and conceptions within contemporary philosophy, distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported, construct well supported interpretations of diverse viewpoints and reason well about written and oral discourse.

PHIL 350 Philosophy of Religion

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course is a historical and topical survey of the questions, problems, and theories philosophers have developed in attempts to understand religion as a fundamental impulse within human experience and as a major cultural force. Rather than survey the different religions, this course considers the basic philosophical beliefs and concepts that seem auxiliary to religion. Topics include the possibility of religious knowledge, faith versus reason, theistic arguments, conceptions of God, religious language, atheism, agnosticism, mysticism, the problem of evil, immortality, the challenge of science, and religion's influence on ethics and politics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: identify important questions and conceptions within Philosophy of Religion, distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported, construct well supported interpretations of diverse viewpoints and reason well about written and oral discourse.

PHIL 352 Introduction to World Religions

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course will introduce students to the major world religious traditions, including indigenous sacred ways, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students will study the practices and beliefs of each tradition and will read selected material from the sacred writings of each tradition. Also, the influence of these religions on contemporary issues in the United States including ethnicity, ethnocentrism, racism, ageism, class differences, and sexual orientation is considered. This course fulfills Cosumnes River College's Ethnic/Multicultural requirement for the Associates Degree.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: identify important questions and conceptions concerning world religions, distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported, construct well supported interpretations of diverse viewpoints and reason well about written and oral discourse.

PHIL 356 Introduction to the Bible

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

In this course, students survey the literary, historical, ethical, theological and philosophical themes of the Bible. Students will read extensive passages from the Hebrew and Christian scriptures with special focus on textual exegesis and analysis. Topics from the Hebrew scriptures include the Law, the development of monotheism, the social justice tradition of the Prophets, and the Writings. Topics from the New Testament scriptures include the investigation of the Gospels and the "Jesus Problem" and the examination of the early development of the Christian Church.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: identify important questions and conceptions concerning Biblical Studies, distinguish from among divergent interpretations those that are better supported and those that are less well supported, construct well supported interpretations and reason well about written and oral discourse.

PHIL 360 Social/Political Philosophy

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

A historical, methodological, and topical survey of significant themes of social and political philosophy from Plato to our present times: authority, freedom, government, justice, law, rights, society and the state.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

understand and appreciate the nature and methods of social science.

PHIL 495 Independent Studies in Philosophy

Units: 1 - 3

Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).