Catalog 2019-20

Anthropology

Associate Degrees for Transfer

A.A.-T. in Anthropology

The Associate in Arts in Anthropology for Transfer Degree (AA-T) is designed to meet common lower-division requirements for a major in Anthropology at California State University (CSU) campuses by completion of 60 transferable semester units with a minimum 2.0 GPA, to include either the California State University General Education Breadth pattern or the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum; students must earn a grade of C or better in all the courses for the major as described in the Required Program.

Anthropology is the study of humans. Anthropologists study our species throughout time; focusing on our diverse modern culture and cultural adaptations, our biological classification as a species and our inclusion in the Order Primates, and our species' past developments, including our first steps to our first civilizations. The goal of Anthropology is to study the similarities and differences in biological and cultural adaptations and features across the globe throughout our human history.

Anthropology is a holistic discipline, which means that anthropologists study all aspects of humans and our behavior. The field of Anthropology has been broken up into four main sub-fields: Cultural Anthropology, Biological Anthropology, Archaeology and Linguistics. Cultural Anthropology is concerned with the study of human culture and its variations across time and space. Biological Anthropologists aim to study our species from a biological perspective- examining our DNA, relationship to our closest animal relatives, the primates and the fossil evidence of our earliest human ancestors. Archaeology is the study of our past, focused specifically on reconstructing past behavior by looking at objects used by past people. Linguistic Anthropologists study human language and communication.

This degree offers courses that satisfy lower division General Education requirements in both the physical and social sciences, providing students with a solid foundation in anthropology as well as the standard prerequisites for upper division coursework leading to the baccalaureate degree. Students planning to transfer to a four-year school with a major in Anthropology should consult the lower division requirements at the university they plan to attend.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
Core:
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology 3
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory 1
ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology  (3) 3
  or ANTH 313 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: Medical Focus  (3)
ANTH 323 Introduction to Archaeology 3
STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics  (4) 3 - 4
  or PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences  (3)
Anthropology Electives:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ANTH 303 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology  (3)
ANTH 316 Global Forces in Culture Change  (3)
ANTH 324 World Prehistory  (3)
ANTH 331 The Anthropology of Religion  (3)
ANTH 332 Native Peoples of California  (3)
ANTH 334 Native Peoples of North America  (3)
ANTH 341 Introduction to Linguistics  (3)
ANTH 374 Birth to Death: The Anthropology of Primate Culture and Behavior  (3)
ANTH 336 Anthropology of Sex, Sexuality and Gender  (3)
Science Electives:
  [[[ GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3) 3 - 4
  and  GEOL 301 ] Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  or [ GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
  and  GEOL 306 ]] Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
  or  GEOG 335 ] Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications  (3)
  or  PSYC 335 Research Methods in Psychology  (3)
Total Units: 19 - 21

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. (PSLO 1)

Recognize the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge.

Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established "authorities" is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data.

Design a scientific inquiry.

CLEARLY EXPRESS SELF WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT ANTHROPOLOGY DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC ANTHROPOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING MAJOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. (PSLO 2)

Produce laboratory exercises or field projects which address background information, procedures, results and analysis of data developed during the event of activity.

Write essays explaining anthropological processes in clear and concise terms

DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. (PSLO 3)

Demonstrate problem solving abilities in major content areas of Anthropology including evolution, genetics, culture, archaeology and human evolution.

Analyze the logic of multiple choice questions and choose the correct response from among related items.

Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer.

Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of anthropology including evolution, culture, genetics, archaeology and human evolution.

UTILIZE APPROPRIATE FIELDWORK TECHNIQUES FOR ANTHROPOLOGY. (PSLO 4)

Conduct participation observation studies.

Take appropriate field notes while conducting participant observation studies.

Gather data in an appropriate, non-judgmental manner.

Perform skeletal measurements.

Identify major bones and features of both human and non-human primates.

Design an anthropological experiment.

Use diagrams, sketches and maps appropriately in field write-ups.

EVALUATE ANTHROPOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. (PSLO 5)

Choose appropriate data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis.

Collect data and keep organized records.

Use basic graphical and statistical analysis of data.

Reach and express logical conclusions drawn on anthropological data.

Present data in the form of posters, presentations, and/or written reports how anthropological information is relevant to personal and community issues.

Recognize the ethical implications of research on human subjects.

EMPLOY INFORMATION GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE ANTHROPOLOGICAL IDEAS. (PSLO 6)

Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.

Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found

Career Information

Anthropologists with baccalaureate or graduate degrees work as archaeological technicians or project directors for private, state or federal organizations, museum management, forensic specialists in police departments and crime labs, primatology and zoo curation, teaching, consultant or analyst for private, government or educational institutions, non-profit organizations, information technologies, tourism, public health services, and social work.

NOTE TO TRANSFER STUDENTS:
The Associate Degree for Transfer program is designed for students who plan to transfer to a campus of the California State University (CSU). Other than the required core, the courses you choose to complete this degree will depend to some extent on the selected CSU for transfer. In addition, some CSU-GE Breadth or IGETC requirements can also be completed using courses required for this associate degree for transfer major (known as “double-counting”). Meeting with a counselor to determine the most appropriate course choices will facilitate efficient completion of your transfer requirements. For students wishing to transfer to other universities (UC System, private, or out-of-state), the Associate Degree for Transfer may not provide adequate preparation for upper-division transfer admissions, because many universities require more lower division courses than those in this degree. Even the CSU's that accept this transfer degree may likely require more lower division courses to achieve the Bachelor degree. It is critical that you meet with a CRC counselor to select and plan the courses for the major, as programs vary widely in terms of the required preparation.

Associate Degrees

A.S. in Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humans. Anthropologists study our species throughout time; focusing on our diverse modern culture and cultural adaptations, our biological classification as a species and our inclusion in the Order Primates, and our species past developments, including our first steps to our first civilizations. The goal of Anthropology is to study the similarities and differences in biological and cultural adaptations and features across the globe throughout our human history.

Anthropology is a holistic discipline, which means that anthropologists study all aspects of humans and our behavior. The field of Anthropology has been broken up into four main sub-fields: Cultural Anthropology, Physical Anthropology, Archaeology and Linguistics. Cultural Anthropology is concerned with the study of human culture and its variations across time and space. Physical Anthropologists aim to study our species from a biological perspective- examining our DNA, relationship to our closest animal relatives, the primates and the fossil evidence of our earliest human ancestors. Archaeology is the study of our past, focused specifically on reconstructing past behavior by looking at objects used by past people. Linguistic Anthropologists study human language and communication.

The CRC Anthropology program offers courses that satisfy lower division General Education requirements in both the physical and social sciences. In addition, the program offers an Associate Degree in Anthropology that provides students with a solid foundation in anthropology as well as the standard prerequisites for upper division coursework leading to the baccalaureate degree. Students planning to transfer to a four-year school with a major in Anthropology should consult the lower division requirements at the university they plan to attend.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
Fall, Spring or Summer Term:
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology 3
Fall, Spring or Summer Term:
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory 1
Fall, Spring or Summer Term:
ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology  (3) 3
  or ANTH 313 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: Medical Focus  (3)
Spring Semester:
ANTH 323 Introduction to Archaeology 3
Check with department for schedule:
PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences  (3) 3 - 4
  or STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics  (4)
Check with department for schedule:
A minimum of 6 units from the following: 6
ANTH 303 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology  (3)
ANTH 316 Global Forces in Culture Change  (3)
ANTH 324 World Prehistory  (3)
ANTH 331 The Anthropology of Religion  (3)
ANTH 332 Native Peoples of California  (3)
ANTH 334 Native Peoples of North America  (3)
ANTH 341 Introduction to Linguistics  (3)
ANTH 374 Birth to Death: The Anthropology of Primate Culture and Behavior  (3)
ANTH 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology  (1 - 3)
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
Any other Anthropology course listed above
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society  (3)
COMM 325 Intercultural Communication  (3)
GEOG 310 Human Geography: Exploring Earth's Cultural Landscapes  (3)
GEOG 331 Exploring Maps and Geographic Technologies  (3)
GEOG 335 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications  (3)
MUFHL 330 World Music  (3)
NUTRI 310 Cultural Foods of the World  (3)
PHIL 352 Introduction to World Religions  (3)
PSYC 368 Cross Cultural Psychology  (3)
SOC 321 Race, Ethnicity and Inequality in the United States  (3)
Total Units: 22 - 23

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PROCESSES OF SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND ESTABLISHED KNOWLEDGE. (PSLO 1)

Recognize the way in which research leads to generally accepted conclusions and the integration of new research data with the building of a body of scientific knowledge.

Recognize that the information presented in science textbooks and other established "authorities" is the result of research conducted in the field or the lab and is based on an accumulation of data.

Design a scientific inquiry.

CLEARLY EXPRESS SELF WHEN WRITING OR SPEAKING ABOUT ANTHROPOLOGY DEMONSTRATING KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC ANTHROPOLOGICAL TERMINOLOGY AND UNDERSTANDING MAJOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONCEPTS. (PSLO 2)

Produce laboratory exercises or field projects which address background information, procedures, results and analysis of data developed during the event of activity.

Write essays explaining anthropological processes in clear and concise terms.

DEMONSTRATE BOTH CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND TEST TAKING SKILLS WHEN COMPLETING ESSAY, OBJECTIVE AND MULTIPLE CHOICE EXAMS. (PSLO 3)

Demonstrate problem solving abilities in major content areas of Anthropology including evolution, genetics, culture, archaeology and human evolution.

Analyze the logic of multiple choice questions and choose the correct response from among related items.

Write clear responses to essay question prompts without including extraneous information or omitting information necessary to provide a clear answer.

Demonstrate content knowledge in the broad areas of anthropology including evolution, culture, genetics, archaeology and human evolution.

UTILIZE APPROPRIATE FIELDWORK TECHNIQUES FOR ANTHROPOLOGY. (PSLO 4)

Conduct participation observation studies.

Take appropriate field notes while conducting participant observation studies.

Gather data in an appropriate, non-judgmental manner.

Perform skeletal measurements.

Identify major bones and features of both human and non-human primates.

Design an anthropological experiment.

Use diagrams, sketches and maps appropriately in field write-ups.

EVALUATE ANTHROPOLOGICAL DATA, DRAW REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS, RECOGNIZE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONCLUSIONS AND APPLY THESE CONCLUSIONS TO PERSONAL, COMMUNITY AND SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS. (PSLO 5)

Choose appropriate data to collect in order to address a specific hypothesis.

Collect data and keep organized records.

Use basic graphical and statistical analysis of data.

Reach and express logical conclusions drawn on anthropological data.

Present data in the form of posters, presentations, and/or written reports how anthropological information is relevant to personal and community issues.

Recognize the ethical implications of research on human subjects.

EMPLOY INFORMATION GATHERING TOOLS TO INVESTIGATE ANTHROPOLOGICAL IDEAS. (PSLO 6)

Use the Internet in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.

Use the library in order to gather scientific information, including the ability to recognize the relevance and scientific validity (or lack thereof) of information when found.

STUDENTS WILL EMBRACE CULTURAL DIVERSITY. (PSLO 7)

Apply the concept of cultural relativism to real world situations.

Develop the perspective of "global citizen" to encourage respect for the world's people and environment.

Recognize factors of human biological and cultural variation.

Celebrate the varied trajectory of our species from prehistory and into the future.

Career Information

Anthropologists with baccalaureate or graduate degrees work as archaeological technicians or project directors for private, state or federal organizations, museum management, forensic specialists in police departments and crime labs, primatology and zoo curation, teaching, consultant or analyst for private, government or educational institutions, non-profit organizations, information technologies, tourism, public health services, and social work.

A.S. in General Science

Areas of Study include:

  • Physical Anthropology
  • Astronomy
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Engineering
  • Physical Geography
  • Geology
  • Physics

Eighteen (18) units of transfer level course work in science is required. Two laboratory courses must be included: one in the physical sciences and one in the biological sciences. Courses may be selected from astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physical geography, physical anthropology, and physics. The student, in consultation with a counselor, should choose science courses to meet his or her program, transfer, or general education requirements.

Students interested in transferring to a four-year university with a science major are encouraged to complete a science AS or AS-T degree such as Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering, Geography, Geology, or Physics. This General Science degree may not include the majors-level transfer courses needed for many science majors. Students are strongly recommended to see a counselor for guidance.

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
A. Life Science with Lab:
A minimum of 4 units from the following: 4
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
  and ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory  (1)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology  (4)
B. Physical Science with Lab:
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory  (1)
  and ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy  (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry  (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
  and CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II  (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II  (5)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory  (1)
  and GEOL 310 Historical Geology  (3)
ENGR 304 How Things Work  (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism  (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4)
C. Additional Science Courses:
A minimum of 11 units from the following: 111
ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology  (3)
ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory  (1)
ASTR 300 Introduction to Astronomy  (3)
ASTR 400 Astronomy Laboratory  (1)
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology  (3)
BIOL 307 Biology of Organisms  (4)
BIOL 310 General Biology  (4)
BIOL 342 The New Plagues: New and Ancient Infectious Diseases Threatening World Health  (3)
BIOL 350 Environmental Biology  (3)
BIOL 352 Conservation Biology  (3)
BIOL 390 Natural History Field Study  (0.5 - 4)
BIOL 400 Principles of Biology  (5)
BIOL 410 Principles of Botany  (5)
BIOL 420 Principles of Zoology  (5)
BIOL 430 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 431 Anatomy and Physiology  (5)
BIOL 440 General Microbiology  (4)
BIOL 462 Genetics in Contemporary Human Society  (3)
CHEM 300 Beginning Chemistry  (4)
CHEM 305 Introduction to Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 306 Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 309 Integrated General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry  (5)
CHEM 321 Environmental Chemistry  (3)
CHEM 322 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory  (1)
CHEM 400 General Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 401 General Chemistry II  (5)
CHEM 420 Organic Chemistry I  (5)
CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry II  (5)
ENGR 304 How Things Work  (3)
GEOG 300 Physical Geography: Exploring Earth's Environmental Systems  (3)
GEOG 301 Physical Geography Laboratory  (1)
GEOG 305 Global Climate Change  (3)
GEOG 306 Weather and Climate  (3)
GEOL 300 Physical Geology  (3)
GEOL 301 Physical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 305 Earth Science  (3)
GEOL 306 Earth Science Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 310 Historical Geology  (3)
GEOL 311 Historical Geology Laboratory  (1)
GEOL 330 Introduction to Oceanography  (3)
GEOL 390 Field Studies in Geology  (1 - 4)
PHYS 310 Conceptual Physics  (3)
PHYS 350 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 360 General Physics  (4)
PHYS 370 Introductory Physics - Mechanics and Thermodynamics  (5)
PHYS 380 Introductory Physics - Electricity and Magnetism, Light and Modern Physics  (5)
PHYS 411 Mechanics of Solids and Fluids  (4)
PHYS 421 Electricity and Magnetism  (4)
PHYS 431 Heat, Waves, Light and Modern Physics  (4)
Total Units: 18

1Courses used in A or B above will not count towards C, except units exceeding the 4 or 3 unit minimum in A and B. For example, a student completing the 5 unit CHEM 309 under B could apply 2 of those units towards C. A total of 18 science units is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

explain the core perspectives of the scientific method and apply it to at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 1)

solve introductory problems of a conceptual and/or numerical nature of at least one scientific discipline. (SLO 2)

accurately apply the basic vocabulary and concepts of at least one scientific discipline verbally and in writing. (SLO 3)

recognize the use and misuse of scientific concepts in society including politics and the media. (SLO 4)

Anthropology (ANTH) Courses

ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or equivalent skills as demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID ANTH 110

This course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology, and analyzes the human place in nature. Applying principles of genetics and evolution, this course will explore modern human variation and how we evolved, including the unique role of culture. The course also covers the classification and distribution of living and extinct human populations, how we determine the geological age of our ancestors, and our relationship to non-human primates such as monkeys and apes. Topics covered in this course include: the scientific method, principles and mechanisms of genetics and heredity, geological dating methods, classification of humans and our near relatives, social organization and behavior of living primates, comparative skeletal anatomy of humans and non-human primates. Local field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

APPLY GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND GENERAL SCIENCE AS IT RELATES TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY.(SLO 1)

ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory

Units: 1

Hours: 54 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Corequisite: ANTH 300

Advisory: MATH 100, or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID ANTH 115L

This course is an introductory laboratory course designed to provide students with an opportunity to become familiar with the methods of the science of biological anthropology while investigating topics in laboratory and field situations. Topics covered in the course are: the scientific method, sources of biological variation and forces of evolution, human osteology (bone identification), human variation, taxonomy and comparative osteology of the primates, comparative behavior, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. A field trip to the local zoo will be included. This course is designed as a companion course to Anthropology 300 - Biological Anthropology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

ARTICULATE GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND GENERAL SCIENCE AS THEY RELATE TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY.(SLO 1)

ANTH 303 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ANTH 301 or BIOL 100 or BIOL 102, and eligibility for ENGWR 300 or equivalent skills as demonstrated by the assessment process

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course provides an overview of forensic anthropology, which is an applied field of biological anthropology. Forensic anthropologists answer questions of medicolegal significance by applying techniques designed for the analysis of human skeletal remains. This course will focus on the introductory techniques used for human skeletal identification and trauma analysis. This identification will provide understanding of the broader aspects of applied anthropology and its role working with law enforcement agencies, human rights issues as well as ethical considerations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DESCRIBE THE SCIENTIFIC METHODS AND THEORIES USED BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS WITHIN A FORENSIC CONTEXT (SLO 1)

ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or the equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID ANTH 120

This course is an introduction to the cultures and customs of human groups throughout the world with the aim of understanding how cultures function based on their world views. Topics include subsistence methods, religious belief systems, linguistics, economics, political organization, kinship, gender, marriage and family systems, social stratification, and globalization. This course stresses anthropological concepts such as culture, cultural relativism, holism, ethnocentrism, cross-cultural comparisons, world view, culture change, fieldwork, ethics and theory. A field trip may be required at the discretion of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (SLO 1)

ANTH 313 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: Medical Focus

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or the equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID ANTH 120

This course is an introduction to the cultures and customs of human groups throughout the world with the aim of understanding how cultures function based on their world views. Topics include subsistence methods, religious belief systems, linguistics, economics, political organization, kinship, gender, marriage and family systems, social stratification, and globalization. This course emphasizes the intersection of culture and medical practices, perspectives on healing and health, and the notion that biology and culture matter equally in the human experience of disease. Through ethnographic examples the course stresses anthropological concepts such as culture, cultural relativism, holism, ethnocentrism, cross-cultural comparisons, world view, culture change, fieldwork, ethics and theory. This Introduction to Cultural Anthropology course is highly recommended for students pursuing degrees in the health fields. This class is not intended for students who have already completed Anthropology 310. A field trip may be required at the discretion of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (SLO 1)

ANTH 316 Global Forces in Culture Change

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or the equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

The course will focus on how global forces in culture change have an impact on groups of people within the United States and non-western cultures, such as European colonialism (including the slave trade), minority and indigenous people activism, and a redefinition of male and female roles with migration. The course considers such global forces as modernization, development, trade and finance, tourism, migration and refugees, transnationalism, ethnicity and diasporas, technology and digital media, and tribal cultures. Culture change will be illustrated through various ethnographic examples and includes issues such as women's issues, AIDS/HIV, underemployment, famine, terrorism, the digital divide, and overpopulation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF GLOBAL FORCES SHAPING THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD.(SLO 1)

ANTH 323 Introduction to Archaeology

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: eligibility for ENGWR 300 or the equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID ANTH 150

This course is an introduction to the concepts, methods and theoretical perspectives employed in the scientific study of archaeology. Emphasis will be placed on how data is retrieved from the archaeological record, and how it can be used to address questions about the development and evolution of human social systems. Topics will include archaeological theory, survey and excavation methods, laboratory analysis, reconstructing past environments, and drawing conclusions about the past from archaeological data. This course will draw upon examples from the New World as well as archaeological examples worldwide. A field trip may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

IDENTIFY THE APPROPRIATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORIES AND METHODS USED TO INVESTIGATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES. (SLO 1)

ANTH 324 World Prehistory

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course is a broad survey of world prehistory, from an archaeological perspective. Patterns of culture change will be examined beginning at the emergence of human culture through the development of domestication of plants and animals, to the development of literate societies capable of recording their own history (in writing). Included are major cultural developments on every continent, emphasizing similarities and differences in the nature and timing of key technological, cultural, and social changes. The course will be focused around several key developments in human societies including the transition out of the last ice age, domestication of plants and animals, the establishment of "complex" societies, and the development of important technologies, including pottery and writing. Methodologies for learning about the past, major archaeological discoveries, important personalities, and contributions to the modern world are discussed in the context of understanding the strengths and limitations of a scientific approach to human prehistory.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

IDENTIFY THE APPROPRIATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORIES AND METHODS USED TO INVESTIGATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES. (SLO 1)

ANTH 331 The Anthropology of Religion

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or the equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course is a cross-cultural study of the forms and functions of supernatural beliefs and associated rituals in various societies around the world. Emphasis of the course is on understanding beliefs and rituals within their social contexts and on broad comparisons to derive insight into the general functions of beliefs and rituals in human life. Students who have already completed ANTH 330 should not enroll in this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF ANTHROPOLOGY AND CULTURE. (SLO 1)

ANTH 332 Native Peoples of California

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or equivalent skills as demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course provides a study of the many cultures of the different native inhabitants of California from the prehistoric period through the present time, introducing the diversity and complexity of aboriginal California. Topics include native ecological adaptations, material culture, social structure, language, religion and mythology, ideology and worldview, and response to change. The course critically examines the impact of Native Californian cultures on each other as well as interactions between Native Californians and other Native Americans, Americans, Europeans, Africans, Asians, Pacific Islanders, and others. Perspectives on changes in traditional life and Native Californians’ current position in American society will be included as well as contributions of Native Californians to the cultures of the Americas. A field trip may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

EXPLAIN THE DIVERSITY OF NATIVE CALIFORNIANS (SLO 1)

ANTH 334 Native Peoples of North America

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or the equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course is an introductory survey of the cultures of the different native inhabitants of North America from the prehistoric period through the present time. Topics include native ecological adaptations, material culture, social structure, language, religion and mythology, ideology and worldview, and response to change. The course critically examines the impact of Native American cultures on each other as well as the interactions between Native Americans and Europeans, Africans, Asians, Pacific Islanders and others. Perspectives on changes in traditional life and Native Americans’ current positions in North American societies will be included as well as contributions of Native Americans to the cultures of the Americas. A field trip may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

EXPLAIN THE DIVERSITY OF NATIVE NORTH AMERICANS (SLO 1)

ANTH 336 Anthropology of Sex, Sexuality and Gender

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: ANTH 300 (Physical Anthropology) or ANTH 310 (Cultural Anthropology) with a grade of "C" or better, and eligibility for ENGWR 300 (College Composition).

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course provides an introductory overview of anthropological perspectives on sex, sexuality and gender, drawing from all four sub-fields (archaeology, cultural, linguistic, and physical). Topics will include cross-cultural comparisons of the diversity of sex, sexuality, and gender, comparisons of sexual behavior among extinct human ancestors and non-human primates such as monkeys and apes, drawing conclusions about the past from archaeological data, examining the nature/nurture debate, and examining evolutionary perspectives related to sex, sexuality and gender. A field trip may be required at the discretion of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

IDENTIFY CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORIES, METHODS, AND CONCEPTS IN RELATION TO THE STUDY OF SEX, SEXUALITY, AND GENDER. (SLO 1)

ANTH 341 Introduction to Linguistics

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or the equivalent skills as demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

CID: C-ID ANTH 130

This course explores the role of language in social interaction and world view. It examines minority languages and dialects, bilingualism, literacy and the social motivation of language change through technology, globalization, and colonialism. The student will also be introduced to the analytical techniques of linguistics, the universal structures of language, and the demonstration of their relevance to language in sociocultural issues.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL LINGUISTICS.(SLO 1)

ANTH 374 Birth to Death: The Anthropology of Primate Culture and Behavior

Units: 3

Hours: 54 hours LEC

Prerequisite: None.

Advisory: Eligibility for ENGWR 300 or equivalent skills demonstrated through the assessment process.

Transferable: CSU; UC

This course will provide an overview of the life cycle of all primates, including humans, from an anthropological perspective. The basic biology behind the human life cycle will be examined and compared to nonhuman primates. Human and nonhuman primate life histories will be examined cross-culturally and will be compared and contrasted in light of their evolution and origins. The class will stress how cultural practices interact and support optimal reproductive behavior. Topics will include gestation and birth, adolescence, mating strategies and group structure, adulthood and senescence.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

ANALYZE PATTERNS OF REPRODUCTIVE BEHAVIOR IN HUMANS AND PRIMATES WITH RESPECT TO GENETICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS (SLO 1)

ANTH 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology

Units: 1 - 3

Hours: 54 - 162 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Transferable: CSU

An independent studies project involves an individual student or small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regularly offered courses. See the current catalog section of "Special Studies" for full details of Independent Studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

SLO #1: Actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study (College Wide Learning Outcome – Area 4).

ANTH 498 Work Experience in Anthropology

Units: 1 - 4

Hours: 60 - 300 hours LAB

Prerequisite: None.

Enrollment Limitation:

Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position or job related to career goals in Anthropology.

Transferable: CSU

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment in their major field of study or advancement within their career. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. Appropriate level learning objectives are established by the student and the employer. During the semester, the student is required to participate in a weekly orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. Work Experience may be taken for a total of 16 units when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

DEMONSTRATE AN UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF PROFESSIONAL WORKPLACE BEHAVIOR IN A FIELD OF STUDY RELATED ONE’S CAREER.(SLO 1)

Full-time Faculty

Shannon Mills.
Shannon Vellone Mills
Office: BS 142
Phone: (916) 691-7290
E-mail: vellons@crc.losrios.edu
Anastasia Panagakos.
Anastasia Panagakos
Office: SOC 139
Phone: (916) 691-7895
E-mail: PanagaA@crc.losrios.edu
Amanda Paskey.
Amanda Paskey
Office: SOC 135
Phone: (916) 691-7409
E-mail: PaskeyA@crc.losrios.edu

Adjunct Faculty

Jason Edmonds
Phone: 7024
Monique Fortunato
Cassandra Gilmore
Anna Goldfield
Priscilla Loforte

Anthropology is the study of humans. Anthropologists study our species throughout time; focusing on our diverse modern culture and cultural adaptations, our biological classification as a species and our inclusion in the Order Primates, and our species past developments, including our first steps to our first civilizations. The goal of Anthropology is to study the similarities and differences in biological and cultural adaptations and features across the globe throughout our human history.