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Nutrition and Foods

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions

  1. Is this College accredited?
  2. How does the program link coursework to industry standards and work to meet them?
  3. Is there a separate application for the diet tech or A.S. in Nutrition and Foods degree program?
  4. Are required courses regularly offered days, evenings, weekends, summer, fall and spring?
  5. What does the program cost?
  6. What teaching formats such as online, televised, lecture and laboratory are used to deliver instruction?
  7. What general skill levels (English, math and computer) are recommended for entry-level coursework and to progress satisfactorily?
  8. What does it feel like to be a student in this program?
  9. What are common advising issues in this program that counselors should know about?
  10. Are there any special scholarships available to students in this program?

Answers

1. IS THIS PROGRAM ACCREDITED?

Yes.  The college is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). 

Community colleges are accredited by WASC every six years.  The process includes a year-long self-study during which a college looks at itself in light of the four accreditation standards used by WASC to evaluate every aspect of college operations, including: Institutional Mission and Effectiveness; Student Learning Programs and Services; Resources; and Leadership and Governance.

Following the self-study, an accreditation team visits the college for several days and reports to the WASC commission recommending a variety of possible actions. 

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2. HOW DOES THE PROGRAM LINK COURSEWORK TO INDUSTRY STANDARDS AND WORK TO MEET THEM?

The A.S. degree in Nutrition and Foods was created based on the need of students and advise of our Advisory Committee.  The curriculum is design to prepare the students to transfer to a didactic program in dietetics while mastering some of the many competencies.

The Department of Nutrition and Foods stays up to date in several ways. The Advisory Board keeps the faculty in touch with day to day change in practice. In addition, through regular contact with our professional associations and contact, the NUTRI faculty are kept abreast of any new standards and policies.

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3. IS THERE A SEPARATE APPLICATION FOR A.S. in NUTRITION AND FOODS DEGREE PROGRAM?

Not at this time.

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4. ARE REQUIRED COURSES REGULARLY OFFERED DAYS, EVENINGS, WEEKENDS, SUMMER, FALL and SPRING?

As long as the budget will permit, we plan to offer all the NUTRI courses online every fall and spring semester. NUTRI 300 is offered every semester, including summer.

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5. WHAT DOES THE PROGRAM COST?

For California resident students who are eligible for a Board of Governors Grant known as the “BOG”, there is no enrollment fee (tuition) at all.

For California students who are not eligible for the BOG, the enrollment fee is only $26 per unit (please check the college web site for more updated tuition rate http://www.losrios.edu/lrc/lrc_tuitionfees_fall.php). To see if you are eligible for the BOG, go to the CRC financial Aid website.

Non-California residents will naturally have higher fees, currently $244 per unit.  Again, please check the college web site for more updated tuition rate.

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6. WHAT TEACHING FORMATS SUCH AS ONLINE, TELEVISED, LECTURE AND LABORATORY ARE USED TO DELIVER INSTRUCTION?

All NUTRITION courses are taught exclusively online. Students “talk” to each other and professors via email and the Online Learning System.  NUTRI 300 is also taught in the traditional classroom as well as televised formats.

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7. WHAT GENERAL SKILL LEVELS (English, math and computer) ARE RECOMMENDED FOR ENTRY-LEVEL COURSEWORK AND TO PROGRESS SATISFACTORILY?

We recommend students have a good grasp of the English language, so that they will be able to complete textbook readings, interpret research articles and write research papers (in NUTRI 310, 322, 340). We recommend that students have basic math skills, as they will need to calculate ratios and percentages, perform unit conversions, and costs estimates. Students should be comfortable with computers in order to use email, diet analysis software, word processing software and the Internet. For online classes, students will be required to assess their skill by completing the following quizzes: Technical Skills Quiz and Student Skills Quiz at http://www.crc.losrios.edu/Student_Services/Distance_Education/Online_Classes/Online_Course_Guidelines_and_FAQ.htm

Students with a total score of 75 or less should be advised to enroll in HCD 320, Skills for Online Student Success in order to successfully navigate the online degree.

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8. WHAT DOES IT FEEL LIKE TO BE A STUDENT IN THIS PROGRAM?

What is the classroom culture like?
Online students are more open and willing to share their experience and knowledge with others. Many of these students have worked for years in related fields and some even have advanced degrees already

What is the nature of the relationships between students and between the students and professor?

There is a great deal of open communication. With e-mail, they can (and do) reach the professors and counselor.

What do students have to say about this program?
They are positive about the experience on the whole. The following comments are offered by Elif Yildrim, a 2007 graduate and Haley Lucas (2008).

Regarding on the course content:
“Overall, I didn’t find the course content very difficult, but it wasn’t easy either. Particularly, I found Advanced Nutrition Class (Nutrition & Metabolism) very difficult. It would have been easier if I had taken science classes previously.” (Elif)

Others said:

·         The variety of courses available exposed the many directions and areas that could be pursued in the nutrition field.

·         I thought this program was challenging and a great learning experience and I wouldn't change any of it.

·         I enjoyed the courses I have taken online this semester.  I feel they have broadened my Nutrition knowledge and have made me appreciate the Dietetics profession to a greater degree.  

 Regarding the online format:

“I particularly liked the discussion board on Blackboard (the online system), sharing information with other student(s) is very helpful…assignments were really appropriate”. (Elif)


“You must be very bold and self-directed because everything is on you. I already had a BA in education.” (Haley)

Others said: 

·          I loved that there was an online program. I wouldn't have been able to complete the program if it was not.

·         At the same time, the online aspect was best for me. I was working 3 jobs and volunteering at several places to increase my chances of getting into an internship. I don't think I would have been able to take a traditional class.  

·         On-line learning from CRC has been a wonderful, satisfying and positive experience. Should the need arise to pursue courses in the future; the first place I would go to would be CRC.

Regarding the responsiveness of the program to student issues:
“Absolutely. All of the teachers are/were very helpful in this course.” (Elif)

·         I learned so much about nutritional intake.  My notes are reflecting so much more nutritional content regarding what's provided in the diet and with supplements.  This course really adds that knowledge to the charting process. 

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9. WHAT ARE COMMON ADVISING ISSUES IN THIS PROGRAM THAT COUNSELORS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT?

Course sequence.
First of all, some of our students already have extensive college work so much of their GE may be completed. But, for the brand new college student, it would be important to advise them to front-load their program with the important math and English courses. The math will allow them to take the chemistry. 

The program faculty has prepared a grid of prerequisites and advisories that will help guide course sequence since we know that very few students will be able to do this program full-time. 

Course substitution/waiver issues.
The program faculty is very cooperative regarding such waiver/subs. The biggest issue will be one of currency of knowledge. It is common to find a student with an equivalent course from, say, CSU-SLO but it was taken five to ten years ago. This is a dynamic field and demands currency of knowledge. Prof. Wassmer will often suggest that a “challenge by examination” might work. 

This Diet Tech Program does not prepare for Registered Dietician education.

Students sometimes think that this is the “first step” towards becoming an RD but that is not the case. The science and math load is considerable heavier and the sequences in chemistry and biology different. Even though several of our courses “sound like” courses required in the CSUS and other Didactic Program in Dietetics, they will not be used there since theirs are upper-division courses with heavier science prerequisites.

The A.S. Degree in Nutrition and Foods prepares students for the didactic program in dietetics.  Students may be required to take similar and more advanced NUTRI courses at the University.  Talk to the Program counselor to ensure that students take the appropriate science and math courses that are transferrable.    

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10. ARE THERE ANY SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THIS PROGRAM?

Please refer to the college financial aid office and web site for information about scholarships and financial aid. 

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Cosumnes River College | 8401 Center Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95823 | 916-691-7344 | info@crc.losrios.edu | Copyright © 2014 Los Rios Community College District